Nick Williams

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since Sep 19, 2012
Billings, MT
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Recent posts by Nick Williams

No experience to share, but the search phrase you're looking for is "Bladder tank" You'll do a lot better searching for that...


Here's some up to 25,000 gallons

https://store.interstateproducts.com/products/Water-Tanks?gclid=Cj0KCQjw-af6BRC5ARIsAALPIlUZRPPIcxK0rvKRQZSohptWbarJ-3LaBpgWIn-1XYSo-iZfFtQwGTMaAtL6EALw_wcB
2 weeks ago
Yeah, I'd have no worries. Coal is just concentrated ancient organic matter in the first place.

In fact, leonardite coal is a fairly common soil additive, as it's oxidized to basically pure humic acid.
2 months ago
Metallurgist here (no really, it's on my business card and everything). Pure aluminum melts at >1200 F, but alloys start melting at a lower temp (same way that mixing salt and water makes a solution that melts at a lower temperature than either salt or ice).

The solidus temperature (where an alloy starts melting) for 6061 (which this probably is) is 1080 F. Not to diminish the performance of your stove by any means, just this piece of aluminum probably didn't hit >1200 F. Would be surprised if it even hit 1100 (molten aluminum gets REALLY runny). But yeah, aluminum is definitely not a great choice for a stove...
2 months ago
My favorite thing to do with eggplants is Caponata

Basically cube eggplant, fry in olive oil with diced celery, onions, peppers, olives, pretty much whatever. Toss with tomato paste, vinegar, little bit of sugar, diced tomato, pine nuts (or chopped almonds), pepper, garlic, whatever else tastes good to you. Let marinate for a while, and eat on toast points, with a spoon, on pasta, whatever...

So good...
3 years ago
Anything that burns is going to generate CO, sure, but with excess O2, that'll drop off real quickly as the CO burns and forms CO2. 14% would be a lot extra for a natural gas furnace (designed that way so you're not heating up extra air that's going to be exhausted out the stack). Since a RMH cools the exhaust so much, the loss in efficiency from that isn't an issue.


Would be interested in PPM NOX. NOX generally increases with excess air until you add so much you cool the flame temperature, and is generally something heater manufacturers are more worried about than CO. If everything I've seen about RMH is to be believed, you get more than hot enough in the combustion chamber to form NOX. Not knocking RMH by any means, just curious...

3 years ago
For what it's worth, you will have some Hydrogen Carbonate as a result of produced carbon dioxide reacting with the water...
6 years ago

r john wrote:

Markham Cornoit wrote:Have a wild idea of heating up water by using a windmill. I use to work with electronic's and heavy hydaulic's. At first I wanted to use a hydraulic pump, but a leak would spray the surroundings with hydraulic oil. Is it possible to build a compact hi power waterbrake? It has to be sturdy as well. I don't want to hang in the tower once a week.



I am concerned with the complicated drivetrain of wind generators and think a hydraulic drive would really simplify the wind turbine especially if used with a hydraulic accumulator. What I am struggling with is finding a slow speed hydraulic pump.



Most hydraulic pumps are going to be positive displacement pumps, and should theoretically operate at any speed (In practice, of course there are both upper and lower limitations). A gear pump would probably be the best choice for a windmill.
7 years ago
The things that spring to mind for me are garlic, lentils, beans and potatoes. I've never tried to save the seeds from any of them, but the first generation usually turns out pretty well...
7 years ago
For what it's worth, the USDA has a neat search tool that allows you to search plants by type, rainfall requirements, pH requirements, coppice ability, nitrogen fixation, and a ton more categories...


http://plants.usda.gov/adv_search.html
7 years ago
That they do.

Plus they have the side benefit of providing a bit of heat for a greenhouse in the winter. I imagine you'd have to be careful about humidifying your greenhouse too much though...
7 years ago