Leo Horthy

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since Jan 12, 2012
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Recent posts by Leo Horthy

The real answer is, of course, that there is no one leading the permaculture movement here in the US. There are many people working in various ways to promote and spread the goodness that is permaculture, but it is a scattered movement, each unto their own domain. No one person is leading or coordinating this. We do not have a figurehead.

Something tells me that this is as it should be. We have modeled the movement on nature. If it dies out in one place - no problem - efforts will continue elsewhere and in the end it will spread everywhere as the soil of human consciousness is ripe for the germination of this movement.

Without a "head" we are hard to kill (ask anyone who is struggling to eradicate the star thistle).
Two leaders in the permaculture field here in the US that are missing from your list, Penny Livingston in Bolinas, CA and my favorite Warren Brush down in Quail Springs near Santa Barbara.

Chris Kott wrote:So would the fact that crushed egg shells and used coffee grounds make up a large part of my weekly compost contributions mean that my compost will be slug bane, or would the composting break them down too much?



Chris,

My understanding is that you create a barrier with these items - a wall if you will - that the slugs will not cross. I am not sure if they will work together. I think the general idea is you want to mess with the slug's slime and that will stop them in their tracks.

Hope this helps,

Leo
8 years ago
Here are some other "free" methods for slug control. I have not tried any of these myself, but I though I would pass them on anyway.

  • crushed egg shells
  • used coffee grounds
  • anything that is dry and powdered - this will just stick to the slug slime and the slug can't move!
  • 8 years ago

    paul wheaton wrote:

    Leo Horthy wrote:Also, you need to emphasize how important you think this article is, convince your readers of this and ask them to share it with everyone they know. Do this early on in the article so that if they only read part of the article they get the message.



    I kinda do a little of that at the bottom.

    Can you give me an example of wording and where to put it?



    Paul, here is my stab at the wording, I would start the article with the following:

    I want to share with you all a concept that I consider revolutionary. This technique is so simple and yet so effective that I think anyone who is considering gardening with raised beds should do it this way. This is an example of the win-win-win you often get when you model your gardening activities on nature. As I see it hugelkultur has the following benefits:

  • long term soil fertility
  • reuse of yard waste
  • saves water
  • self tilling
  • saves effort (no need to water or till)
  • ...

  • Please read on if saving money, water and effort is of interest to you. If you like the article please email the link to your friends and/or share it on Facebook. This is important stuff - lets get it out there.
    Hi Paul,

    I agree with others here that the article itself needs work. At the moment your article comes up #1 when I search on hugelkultur on Google. However, unless I knew what hugelkultur was there is no way I would search for it. You need need to come up with some other frequently searched for terms in the space that and drop those into the title (both h1 tag and page).

    Also, you need to emphasize how important you think this article is, convince your readers of this and ask them to share it with everyone they know. Do this early on in the article so that if they only read part of the article they get the message.

    If you are able to do this 50MM views will be easy.