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How to Make a Face Mask

 
master steward
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I have heard that medical workers and medical facilities are running out of face masks.  I have decided that now is a good time to make some and thought that I would share what information that I have found.

How to make a face mask articles:

https://nypost.com/2020/03/20/doctors-are-now-running-out-of-face-masks-heres-how-to-make-your-own/

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/03/19/opinion/guidance-against-wearing-masks-coronavirus-is-wrong-you-should-cover-your-face/



I like the red one in the picture though I am looking for the protection that layers might offer.  Here are some templets that I found:







This information is from the first article that I posted:

A vacuum cleaner bag was considered the most formidable household material with a rate of nearly 86 percent protection against the smallest particles tested. Falling behind was a standard dish towel at nearly 73 percent; a cotton-blend T-shirt at 70 percent; and an antimicrobial pillowcase at 68 percent.

They also tested how doubling up on the material could help. In the case of dish towels, two layers showed a notable increase in filtration rate — a 14 percent jump for particles of 1 micron in size — although the same level of increased benefits could not be said for cotton shirts or pillowcases.



Now to get started!  Any suggestions?
 
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Wonder what the micron blockage for multiple layers of silk is? I know when I'm doing dye work, I filter out tiny blotches with silk, not cotton.
 
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Has anyone tried to breath through two layers of tightly woven cloth?   I tried just breathing through two layers of cotton pillow case and then two layers of a lighter weight muslin...it's not so easy.

I am somewhat claustrophobic and just the thought of cloth over my nose leaves me breathless


I do love the idea of helping out and would definitely make some if I thought they were being used?
 
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It is not easy to breath through a properly fitted N95. You need to consider why you need the mask and what the mask needs to accomplish. In most home situations only an I'll person who is coughing needs the mask and that is to stop the spread of water droplets. That of course brings up the challenge of getting a sick child to wear one.  That leads to the secondary advantage of the caregiver wearing one, but the returns are less.  Yes having your mouth and nose covered will help to protect from droplets to an extent. Now what about protecting your eyes?

Something is better than nothing. But there are always trade offs.
 
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I wonder about using some of the non woven things used in clothing construction like pelon or some other interfacing fabric sold by the yard (or something similar to the vacuum cleaner bags mentioned in Anne's quote above) that might filter but not make such a humidity pocket behind the mask like a cotton fabric does?

 
Pearl Sutton
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I am thinking make the layer closet to face out of something like one of the old lightweight quilted bedspreads, lots of air spaces and polyester to keep it from sticking to the face tightly, except on the edges. Think the bedspreads from the 70's...

So my plan here is that type of under layer, multiple layers of silk on it. Me and mom are both claustrophobic, and masks are always iffy at best, that's the most effective thing I can come up with that we could stand. Gives you the feeling of airspace inside the mask.

I have seen variants running around with charcoal in them as a filter medium, and the old plague masks had medicinal herbs in a deep filter system.

And, if you have them around or can get them, coffee filters are pretty tight weave. Might be worth working with them.

I have some dust masks, they showed up by the pallet full to the local ReStore last year, I bought several boxes for house construction. I'll work them into something better. One of those things in hindsight I wish I had bought more now. I thought of how many of them I would actually use. Storage is an issue here. Wish I had bought a LOT more than the 3 or 4 boxes I did.
 
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I'm hearing from several friends who are, or have family who are, first responders and hospital staff in the USA (including some permies members).  They say at this time, the hospitals in the USA don't have enough protective equipment they are being told to reuse paper masks or use a bandana for treating people with (I hope I get this word right) non-aerosol based illnesses like COVID (they are rationing the super-duper masks for those highly infectious airborne illnesses).  So the goal to home-sew a mask is to make it better than those options.  

Since the primary transmission is droplets, we need something that will keep out droplets.  So I'm looking at allergy maks and what they used during WWI to deal with mustard gas attacks with the assumption that human droplets are mostly smaller than those particles.  Damp wool felt, soaked in vinegar or urine was successful in keeping out mustard gas, but I think those particles are smaller than cough droplets.  For grass and tree allergy, a single layer of quilting cotton does the trick, so I suspect a double layer would be better for cough droplets as they provide a slight air buffer between the layers to prevent the droplets wicking inside the mask quickly.  But to be effective, I think one would want to change the mask frequently, after each patient if possible, so one on the front line would need a dozen or two cloth masks per shift.  

That's a lot of masks.  So being simple enough to sew many masks, quickly is a bonus.

It also has to be comfortable enough for the health care professional to wear!  

And last, of all, it has to be washable at crazy-high temperatures.  Many, many, many times.  So cotton is sounding like our best friend at this time.

I'm looking at these two patterns (which are pretty much the same thing but one is a video and one is with words and pictures) as a possible thing to make.  Maybe out of flannel (I read in old WWI and WWII books that this was a popular choice for home-sewn masks) or quilting cotton which has a fairly fine weave and nice pattern.



facemask tutorial


I especially like this pattern as it can easily be worn over the paper masks for an added layer of protection and fun.  There have been some nasty incidents in Canada of people wearing paper masks in public and being mistaken as hoarders or breaking quarantine - when they were actually pregnant or immune compromised who are trying to stay safe.  But a colourful cloth mask over the top of a paper one isn't so threatening.  


As for a filter material between the layers - I don't know how much use it would be for droplet spread illness.  If one could get the paper they use in masks, then I would use this - but I wouldn't' want to take that supply away from the people who make proper masks and I don't think it's washable.  Charcoal is good at capturing odours, but I don't think it does much for droplet spread.  On the whole, I would be worried about the filter material increasing condensation inside the mask (giving the virus a place to grow), decreasing comfort (the person would be less inclined to wear the mask) and if synthetic, breaking down into plastic particles with the frequent high-temperature washing which could break loose and get in the lungs.  

I'll see if I can scrape together some time to make a few.  I would love a couple for myself as allergy season is just starting, as well as some for my friends in the US health care system.  But I don't have much 1/4" elastic and don't want to go to the store if I can help it.

 
Pearl Sutton
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Judith Browning wrote:I wonder about using some of the non woven things used in clothing construction like pelon or some other interfacing fabric sold by the yard (or something similar to the vacuum cleaner bags mentioned in Anne's quote above) that might filter but not make such a humidity pocket behind the mask like a cotton fabric does?



If you make it so it doesn't sit right on the face it would help. Ever worn a proper gas mask with filters? The face part is a rubber thing that makes an airspace above the nose and mouth, the filters come in off the side. Some of them have a one way valve exhale ports. That might all be ideas to look at. I'm a recycle type, I'd probably use something like a margarine tub out of the trash that I heat shape, then add filters to the sides, and output with one way flaps and separate filters. hmm. Now you have me thinking...

Thinking on it more, if the input and output filters are separate items, you can change/wash/throw away only the ones you need to. If the mask is on a person with CV, change the output filter more, their inputs will last longer. The caregiver though would change their inputs more, their output will last longer.

This is a paint spray mask, visual of what I'm thinking of... Only homemade, and with the output filtered too...
 
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In Belgium they have asked people to sew masks to help the supply for the hospitals. They released an Instruction PDF on how to make it.
They suggest a double layered cotton design, where you can insert whatever removable filter you have at home (cut up vacuum filter for example). The design is approved by the federal health office. They say this design isn’t medical grade, but given the shortage it is the next best thing. Once you remove the filter, the mask can be sterilised by boiling to be re-used.
The pdf plus printable pattern is unfortunately written in Dutch, but there are lots of pictures, so I’m sure sewing-savvy people will have enough info with this.
If people are interested, I can look into helping with the translation.

 
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Something else that would hold it off the face is that plastic grid stuff that people weave yarn into to make little houses etc. Looks like it's called plastic canvas mesh?


Or wire to make a frame, anything that keeps it off the face... Might make these things a LOT more wearable. If you are sewing the masks anyway, sew covers big enough to cover your frame. Make the frame fit well, and put something on the edges where it contacts that makes it comfortable and seal well. Layers of duct tape or hot glue come to mind for me. or wrap it in yarn, then put wax on the yarn.
Especially with kids or claustrophobes, if the mask isn't comfortable, it will not get worn effectively.
 
r ranson
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Whatever you use, make sure it can easily withstand high temperatures.  I understand 90C or 200F is not uncommon.

 
r ranson
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To summarize my big post earlier, the masks need to be:

  • simple enough to sew many masks, quickly.
  • comfortable enough for the health care professional to wear!  
  • washable at crazy-high temperatures.


  •  
    pollinator
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    Judith Browning wrote:I wonder about using some of the non woven things used in clothing construction like pelon or some other interfacing fabric sold by the yard (or something similar to the vacuum cleaner bags mentioned in Anne's quote above) that might filter but not make such a humidity pocket behind the mask like a cotton fabric does?


    Someone in my local fiber arts guild said, "I've just learned that the filtration membrane in a surgical mask is meltblown polypropylene. Better known to BFAGsters as nonwoven fabric interfacing! A layer of this in your diy surgical masks might be a good idea!" What do you-all think? That in between a couple layers of cotton? It should help hold the mask's shape away from the face, too. This Instructable is the pattern folks around here have started to use, I believe.
     
    Judith Browning
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    Beth Wilder wrote:

    Judith Browning wrote:I wonder about using some of the non woven things used in clothing construction like pelon or some other interfacing fabric sold by the yard (or something similar to the vacuum cleaner bags mentioned in Anne's quote above) that might filter but not make such a humidity pocket behind the mask like a cotton fabric does?


    Someone in my local fiber arts guild said, "I've just learned that the filtration membrane in a surgical mask is meltblown polypropylene. Better known to BFAGsters as nonwoven fabric interfacing! A layer of this in your diy surgical masks might be a good idea!" What do you-all think? That in between a couple layers of cotton? It should help hold the mask's shape away from the face, too. This Instructable is the pattern folks around here have started to use, I believe.



    That is great to know!
    Now need to see if they still make the stuff that is not 'iron on' or fusible as that has some sort of adhesive on one surface?

    I have not used any in many years but I remember it was sold by the yard and in different weights and should be washable.
     
    r ranson
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    Beth Wilder wrote:
    Someone in my local fiber arts guild said, "I've just learned that the filtration membrane in a surgical mask is meltblown polypropylene. Better known to BFAGsters as nonwoven fabric interfacing! A layer of this in your diy surgical masks might be a good idea!" What do you-all think? That in between a couple layers of cotton? It should help hold the mask's shape away from the face, too. This Instructable is the pattern folks around here have started to use, I believe.



    Sounds neat?  Can it be washed at hot temperatures?  Or would it be single-use like a regular mask?
     
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    I posted this somewhere, a few days ago, now I can't find it, so here it is, again - for a few more mask options:

    https://so-sew-easy.com/face-mask-sewing-patterns/?utm_source=So+Sew+Easy+Newsletter&utm_campaign=0797d1bc05-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_181615727c-0797d1bc05-118742017
     
     
    pollinator
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    I sometimes use a bandana when I'm not planning to be close to people, but I still want to stop the cold air, or smog, and not to accumulate any bacteria or viruses on the surface of it, I spread a drop of essential oil on the inside layer. Tea tree and eucalyptus are believed to have some antiviral properties.
     
    pollinator
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    The most valuable use for these is likely to be in the home - someone infected wears it to catch droplets when coughing. Trouble is it needs to be swapped out really frequently to remain effective. Like at least once per hour.  So you a household probably needs 20+ of these to be washed on rotation.

    They are definitely better than nothing, so better get sewing!
     
    r ranson
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    If we make some extra, is there any specific place to send them?  

    I know a few front line workers that need them, but I understand some US hospitals are putting the call out for people to make cotton masks to help protect the people who help us.
     
    Carla Burke
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    A little hope, (an exerpt from my email,  this morning)on the horizon:
    20200323_104826.jpg
    [Thumbnail for 20200323_104826.jpg]
     
    Anne Miller
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    Many hospital are not accepting the homemade mask.  This news article from Baton Rouge, La says

    Baton Rouge General will be the first hospital to take the masks.  The masks will be sanitized based on federal, CDC standards that allow for cloth to be cleaned and returned to use.  Similar to patient gowns and bedding, homemade masks will go through a thorough cleaning process before being given to patients.



    https://www.wbrz.com/news/wbrz-baton-rouge-general-accepting-homemade-masks-starting-monday/

    I would suggest contacting someone at your local hospital to see their policy.

    There also might be a need at nursing homes, clinics and doctors offices.
     
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    I was asked by a neighbor who works at a nursing home to make these. Cotton both sides with non-woven pelon between. They are loving them. The hospitals get the stuff first. Nursing homes full of high risk patients aren't getting what they need. I'll also include a link where you can make a provided pattern, ship to Iowa and they will insert bands that go around the ears and a filter lining.


    https://www.unitypoint.org/cedarrapids/sewing-surgical-masks.aspx?fbclid=IwAR2MI-Hy6T8r9JN2MpAsD4-Sb2Qgqq8dN8k5OJOt81z1LE9WgUXD10XeHok
    Filename: Sewing-Instructions.pdf
    File size: 9 Kbytes
    Filename: face-mask-pattern.pdf
    File size: 87 Kbytes
     
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    My girl used a furnace filter that she found at the store that had been lightly damaged so she got a discount on it. Then she took it apart, saving the wire for armature for art projects, then cut up the furnace filter paper (lots are allergen blocking) and stuffed them into her cloth masks that her friend made that has pockets in them to insert the filters. You can get a LOT of filters from a furnace filter!
     
    pollinator
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    For non-medical people, a big part of using a face mask is helping to keep from inadvertently touching one's face and nose. If it's not a tight-fitting gas-mask sort of mask, it's probably infiltrating around the edges anyway. Just a thought.
     
    gardener
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    Mark,

    I basically agree with you with one exception.  While the mask may not protect the wearer from the general public, the public may be slightly protected from the wearer.  The reason being that the velocity of exhaled air is slower with the mask.  In particular a sneeze will be greatly slowed and thus not travel so far.

    It is not a lot of protection, but perhaps a little buffer.

    Eric
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    Dale Ziemianski wrote:My girl used a furnace filter that she found at the store that had been lightly damaged so she got a discount on it. Then she took it apart, saving the wire for armature for art projects, then cut up the furnace filter paper (lots are allergen blocking) and stuffed them into her cloth masks that her friend made that has pockets in them to insert the filters. You can get a LOT of filters from a furnace filter!



    If you're going to use a furnace filter, look for one rated MERV-13. 3M makes them under the brand name Filtrete. That grade filters particles down to the 0.3 micron size. The one I picked up, Filtrete 1900, says on the package that it filters 86% of the 0.3 micron particles. An N95 mask filters 95% of the 0.3 micron particles.

    My mask build is still in progress, but I will report back when I have a prototype done with many more details and links that I currently can't find on my phone but are or were in open tabs on my laptop.

    In health and hope.

    -K
     
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    Anne, If the purpose of the protective mask is to prevent one who is coughing from spraying possibly infected saliva/ phlegm onto others, and considering still cold weather in many places, I propose something in the form of a balaclava to cover said mask or to mask the mask, no not baclava although  a pastry would be tasty. Balaclava would cover nose face and help provide retention of body heat with some protection from wind.
     
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    r ranson wrote:non-aerosol based illnesses like COVID


    But COVID-19 is aerosol-based, according to what I've read. Why else would N95 masks be in high demand? As a physician who has turned his blog completely to coronavirus topics wrote
    "Are both Coronavirus and the Flu aerosolized?
    Yes, that’s the primary way the flu is spread. So, Coronavirus is not more spreadable than the flu because it is aerosolized. They both are."
     
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    Masks by metalworkers.  The Canadian Safety Supply Company (IRRC) use to sell my favourite dust mask.  It was mostly an oval of soft aluminum that could be easily pressed to fit any face.  There was a notch for the nose, and a big hole over the mouth, and a couple of bent-over tabs to hold a gauze filter in place.  Any soft cloth could be folded and used for the filter.  The mask sealed tightly around the nose, where most others fail me.  
     
    pollinator
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    PPE: Not just masks, but also gloves and common sense!
    Since I'm a terrible seamstress and I do not even own a sewing machine, I've used a washcloth, folded in half and hand sewn into a sleeve. Inside that sleeve, I run a ring of elastic that goes from ear to ear above my nose and well under my chin. The generous piece of cloth itself runs from ear to ear and top of my nose to well under my chin. The cloth is loose at my ears so I just put a little stitch to close the gap. I've used those little metal clips you use to hold a stack of paper together too. Maybe not sexy but hey: You gotta do what you gotta do.
    Since it makes a larger pocket encompassing mouth and nose, without having to stretch the material, I do not feel so restricted. Stretching cloth also widens that weave, which may afford less protection.
    But yes, a double layer of terry cloth is probably not the best material. Perhaps I could add a coffee filter in the sleeve?At the end of the day, I can wash the terry cloth part with rubbing alcohol and leave it to air dry over night. Hemp is much more absorbent and I'm looking for coffee filter material made of hemp.
    Imagine you are infected and imagine everyone else is infected as well, because you just do not know.
    I wish folks would stop saying that it is only important for the sick to wear that protection: If it is a barrier to droplets, it operates as a barrier in both directions, not as a valve. That is simple physics. It protects the ones who wear it as well as those we see every day.
    I think they made that statement so we would not hoard masks away from all care givers.
    When I wear it, I'm also a lot more conscious of what I do so I absolutely respect the distance of 6 ft. When folks see that you are masked, they just instinctively pull away as well, so it it not just the mask.
    I use them to go shopping, as well as nitrile gloves, and I despair to still see people handling produce with their bare hands! Folks are there trying to protect us by scrubbing the carts and then we go in and handle the produce bare handed! How stupid can we be? I also make good use of the alcohol towelettes they hand over when you get in the store: I keep them in a cup in the cup holder of my car and add some rubbing alcohol. (Keep the cup covered, of course). So in a pinch, or when I go to a different store, I can wash my gloved hands: My skin does not get dry from all that alcohol sanitizing and if the next store is not as vigilant, I don't bring germs from a different store. The blue nitrile gloves are a little thicker too, so they are reusable.
    If only we would all wear these 2 pieces of equipment when we are out and about, the authorities would not need to go so draconian keeping us in lock down for weeks on end. We would not need a stay at home order. Think of how much easier this would be!
    Mask up and glove up, folks. It is time we take responsibility for ourselves to not get infected!
     
    r ranson
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    David Wieland wrote:
    But COVID-19 is aerosol-based, according to what I've read. Why else would N95 masks be in high demand?



    they are still learning about the virus, but thus far the virus is spread primarily by droplets and surfaces.  these droplets aerosolize when the patient is on a ventilator.

    compare this to something like measles that can linger in the air for hours after the sick person leaves the room.
     
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    Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:PPE: Not just masks, but also gloves and common sense!
    Mask up and glove up, folks. It is time we take responsibility for ourselves to not get infected!


    As I've read elsewhere, and realized after considering practical use, gloves can actually be a way to spread contaminants. Taking off a paint-covered glove using a hand wearing another paint-covered glove requires great care to keep the paint completely off skin and clothing. And those gloves must be turned inside out and carefully disposed of to keep other surfaces clean.
     
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    Here is an interesting article about the efficiency of the homemade masks.

    https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/diy-homemade-mask-protect-virus-coronavirus/
     
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    My friend just made a mask that she claims will protect her from coronavirus. Combining it with full body covering plus nitrile gloves for her hands, she feels pretty confident that no one will get closer than 10 feet to her, if even that. I think this is funny beyond bounds. Love it!

    By the way, it's made out of a gourd that she grew.
    image.jpeg
    Homemade anti- coronavirus mask
    Homemade anti- coronavirus mask
     
    Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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    David Wieland wrote:

    Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:PPE: Not just masks, but also gloves and common sense!
    Mask up and glove up, folks. It is time we take responsibility for ourselves to not get infected!


    As I've read elsewhere, and realized after considering practical use, gloves can actually be a way to spread contaminants. Taking off a paint-covered glove using a hand wearing another paint-covered glove requires great care to keep the paint completely off skin and clothing. And those gloves must be turned inside out and carefully disposed of to keep other surfaces clean.



    I was not suggesting one-use throw away gloves: I'm aware that it is tricky to remove throw away/ one use gloves when there is blood on it. I've done it in trauma classes. Since these would be your personal gloves, not to be used by anyone else, you can re-use the gloves.
    Don't you wash your hands with the gloves on then? They can then be removed easily without needing to turn them inside out once they are clean. Use soap, just like you would on your hands or even bleach full strength and get them clean. Bare hands can spread germs as easily IMHO and are harder to clean under the fingernails. Having gloves you can re-use allows you to have a "public" set of hands and having your clean hands, uncontaminated, inside your house so as to not infect your family.
     
    Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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    Adrien Lapointe wrote:Here is an interesting article about the efficiency of the homemade masks.

    https://smartairfilters.com/en/blog/diy-homemade-mask-protect-virus-coronavirus/



    Thanks for this excellent article. It deals with particle size and also breathability: If the mask is not comfortable folks won't wear it, no matter how good it could be.
     
    David Wieland
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    Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:I was not suggesting one-use throw away gloves: I'm aware that it is tricky to remove throw away/ one use gloves when there is blood on it. I've done it in trauma classes. Since these would be your personal gloves, not to be used by anyone else, you can re-use the gloves.
    Don't you wash your hands with the gloves on then? They can then be removed easily without needing to turn them inside out once they are clean. Use soap, just like you would on your hands or even bleach full strength and get them clean. Bare hands can spread germs as easily IMHO and are harder to clean under the fingernails. Having gloves you can re-use allows you to have a "public" set of hands and having your clean hands, uncontaminated, inside your house so as to not infect your family.

    (and from the original post) I use them to go shopping, as well as nitrile gloves, and I despair to still see people handling produce with their bare hands! Folks are there trying to protect us by scrubbing the carts and then we go in and handle the produce bare handed! How stupid can we be?


    Personally, I've never seen a nitrile (=vinyl?) glove that afforded close to the sense of touch of a bare hand and was also strong and loose enough to be reusable. Obviously your hands and glove options allow you that ability, but I doubt that it's feasible for most of us. The practice of cleaning your gloves before going into each store you visit implies ready access to the sanitizer and not much being carried by hand. For people without a vehicle parked close to the store (perhaps shopping as a pedestrian or cyclist), sanitizing gloves between entering nearby stores would be awkward at best. Is this a practice you've adopted specifically for the current outbreak, or is it a routine one for protection from all infections?

    I've long treated my hands as dirty when I've handled any objects, including produce, or grabbed a door handle. That means I wash them before I do anything afterward that requires clean hands to be sanitary. And I wash and/or cook produce before serving or eating it. Washing doesn't sterilize, of course, but it gets me the cleanest food I can practically have, regardless of what contamination might have landed on it before or after I acquired it.
     
    Cécile Stelzer Johnson
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    David Wieland wrote:

    Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:I was not suggesting one-use throw away gloves: I'm aware that it is tricky to remove throw away/ one use gloves when there is blood on it. I've done it in trauma classes. Since these would be your personal gloves, not to be used by anyone else, you can re-use the gloves.
    Don't you wash your hands with the gloves on then? They can then be removed easily without needing to turn them inside out once they are clean. Use soap, just like you would on your hands or even bleach full strength and get them clean. Bare hands can spread germs as easily IMHO and are harder to clean under the fingernails. Having gloves you can re-use allows you to have a "public" set of hands and having your clean hands, uncontaminated, inside your house so as to not infect your family.

    (and from the original post) I use them to go shopping, as well as nitrile gloves, and I despair to still see people handling produce with their bare hands! Folks are there trying to protect us by scrubbing the carts and then we go in and handle the produce bare handed! How stupid can we be?



    Personally, I've never seen a nitrile (=vinyl?) glove that afforded close to the sense of touch of a bare hand and was also strong and loose enough to be reusable. Obviously your hands and glove options allow you that ability, but I doubt that it's feasible for most of us. The practice of cleaning your gloves before going into each store you visit implies ready access to the sanitizer and not much being carried by hand. For people without a vehicle parked close to the store (perhaps shopping as a pedestrian or cyclist), sanitizing gloves between entering nearby stores would be awkward at best. Is this a practice you've adopted specifically for the current outbreak, or is it a routine one for protection from all infections?

    I've long treated my hands as dirty when I've handled any objects, including produce, or grabbed a door handle. That means I wash them before I do anything afterward that requires clean hands to be sanitary. And I wash and/or cook produce before serving or eating it. Washing doesn't sterilize, of course, but it gets me the cleanest food I can practically have, regardless of what contamination might have landed on it before or after I acquired it.



    Frankly, I detest wearing gloves but considering this pandemic, I figure I can put up with this minimal inconvenience better than putting up with getting sick. I don't like it, I just do what I feel needs to be done. The blue nitrile ones seem to work the best for me, affording me enough touch to grasp a door handle or a bag and cleaning easily. Those seem to resist tearing pretty well too. You may find a glove that works better for you perhaps a different brand or style or size.
    As far as the sanitizer, my local Kroger has a dispenser at the entrance, so I grab one and can clean my gloved hands right there and then, before I touch anything in the store, protecting the store patrons and yes, it is a bother. It is a choice. As I stated, I keep a cup, covered, in my cup caddy in my car. I place the used sanitizer in it and pour some rubbing alcohol over it. This way, I can clean my gloved hands again before I go into another store. Perhaps you can treat the handlebars of your bike as I treat the steering wheel, with gloved and sanitized hands. As a pedestrian, I can walk from the far end of the parking lot without touching anything.
    To answer your question, yes, I have adopted that routine because of the pandemic, and yes, it is a bother but as Jean-Paul Sartres used to say:[I'm paraphrasing]  "Life is a succession of choices. We are condemned to choosing. Even doing nothing is a choice". Washing produce, I always did because of chemical residues that may be on it. The mask and gloves: strictly pandemic induced.
    The choice is take a chance on getting infected and die gasping for air for days or weeks on end like a guppy out of water after a very expensive stay in the hospital, perhaps infecting people I love... or put up with the inconvenience of wearing mask and gloves. Feels like no contest to me.
     
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