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'The permaculture book of ferment and human nutrition' by Bill Mollison

 
Posts: 203
Location: NNSW Australia
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I give this book 10 out of 10 acorns - it's a textbook that wouldn't be out of place in either agriculture or anthropology curriculums.

A classic text on fermentation from an anthropological/permacultural perspective.
Written in Mollison's inimitable style with his razor sharp intellect and acerbic wit.
An excellent history of human food preservation with lessons, recipes, techniques from the ages.

Best of all, it is freely available in a number of formats on the open-source book repository archive.org

Contents:
Storing, preserving, cooking foods
The fungi, yeasts, mushrooms, lichens
The grains
The legumes
Roots, bulbs, rhizomes
Fruits, flowers, nuts, oils, olives
Leaf, stem, aguamiels
Marine and freshwater products, fish, molluscs, algae
Meats, birds, insects
Dairy products
Beers, wines, beverages
Condiments, spices, sauces
Agricultural composts, silages, liquid manures
Nutrition and environmental health.

Originally published: 1993

 
Posts: 44
Location: Western Washington
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Any chance you could provide a link? I searched archive.org for a variety of things and could not find it.

That being said, lots of information on Permaculture there.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2952
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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https://archive.org/details/FermentHumanNutritionMollison_201710/page/n1
 
pollinator
Posts: 1574
Location: northern California
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It is a most excellent book, but it's a bit short of detail.  It offers enough to excite about various ideas and practices, but doesn't really provide enough information to put many of them into practice.  I strongly suggest doing other research (which is now easy with the internet) on any particular practice that might be of interest before jumping in and trying it out.
 
Jondo Almondo
Posts: 203
Location: NNSW Australia
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It's not full of complex modern recipes with 16 different herbs and spices, however it covers a lot of traditional methods of food preservation in it's most simple form. There are simple recipes for a vast number of foods, many of which have gone from staples to obscure trivia (aspic, anyone?).

I had a blast trying my hand at the sorghum, maize and banana beer recipes.

Alder Burns is right that this text is best supplemented with online resources. I particularly like the information at UNFAO when it comes to food preservation through fermentation.
 
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https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
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