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using tile on RMH

 
Posts: 55
Location: central Pennsylvania
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I'm sure I've seen photos of (probably European) RMH-like heaters using beautiful tile instead of cob. I am trying to sell my DH on the idea of RMH, but he doesn't care for the cob look. But my google attempts to find them have failed. Does anyone know what I'm describing who could help me find them? Thanks!
 
gardener
Posts: 3220
Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft elevation
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This one may be?

http://donkey32.proboards.com/thread/1464/rocket-kachel-ofen?page=1

There is Peter's which is nice looking too.

http://batchrocket.eu/en/applications#redbell

There is a thread here about beautiful RMH.

https://permies.com/t/40573/beautiful-rocket-mass-heaters

This one is nice looking too.

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMkrLAejhLFghvaN9s_HtAtkwo5vWCPPRIOQb2MhT5ZuU6sI2DWNKsau65XeKP_lQ?key=TkxZdXgxUnVBeGR3R2xHNF8zeUUzbVUyOWZ5LWh3

Few ideas in this thread too.

https://permies.com/t/12578/Oil-Drum-Living-Room-design

Tho, a fair bit of the photos seem gone.

But anything ca be done with the several RMH cores available, and several building techniques. J batch, DSR.  Half barrel, bricks, cob, cast construction, double skinetc. Carry on schooling yourself, and make your plans.


Pretty much any "masonry heater" can be fitted with a batch core. Or a J.


https://www.google.fr/search?biw=1228&bih=599&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=i3zSW6RjsMGXBLTvsNgN&q=masonry+heater&oq=masonry+heater&gs_l=img.3..0j0i7i30k1l2j0i30k1l7.2050392.2053025.0.2054383.7.7.0.0.0.0.91.548.7.7.0....0...1c.1.64.img..0.7.518....0.xvVHe6CyMtA






 
Posts: 44
Location: Western Washington
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My mom has the same problem with them... "It would make it look like I live in a cave!"

I finally got her past that hurdle by noting that you can do the outside however you want. Fortunately, she and dad were contractors and after I explained that we could finish the outside however she wants she finally got on board. Of course, we won't be putting it in until next year as I have to tear out a wall and a section of floor... and we just started the rainy season so that isn't the best idea right now.

Cob is like earth... once you have it set up you can frame it in with wood, make it look like tile, or make it look just about however you want. With the right finishes you could probably make a RMH look like a stone gargoyle standing on a parapet with a bit of artistic skill...
 
Satamax Antone
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Tony Jennings wrote: With the right finishes you could probably make a RMH look like a stone gargoyle standing on a parapet with a bit of artistic skill...



https://permies.com/t/52989/double-chamber-cob-oven-plans
 
Emilie McVey
Posts: 55
Location: central Pennsylvania
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Ok, this very likely is not the right forum to ask this question, so please redirect it to a better one.

My hubby and I are interested in an rmh for our next home, coming up in about a year. Well, I am interested, and he's got questions for which I don't have answers. Here's one: how does one regulate the temperature when using an rmh?  Might it not get uncomfortably hot in the house since, apparently, there is no thermostat to turn off the heat when it reaches the desired temperature?

The same question would apply to a masonry heater, as well.  I gather that the local authorities don't always approve the installation of an rmh, so a masonry heater is another option.  But they are extremely, extremely heavy, and sound like they would cost a small fortune to install, what with the bricks for the heater itself and then the concrete support for the heater.  Does anyone have experience with masonry heaters?


 
gardener
Posts: 3522
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Hi Emily;  
There is, no regulating the temperature of a running rmh. The different thing about them is they only run once or twice a day.
Particularly the newer batchbox design , might only need run once a day depending on conditions.

Yes , the local authority would not know what a rmh was... so therefore you can't have one!  Most insurance company's are uninformed about them as well.
That is of course if they were informed.

Masonry heaters on the other hand are a known stove , so they can be built & insured in most locations.
A catch is they can only be built by a registered mason . Cost reflects the labor & materials involved and you could expect to pay over $10,000 or more for one.

A batch box design rmh with a large brick bell would do the same job for significantly less.
 
 
Emilie McVey
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thomas rubino wrote:Hi Emily;  
There is, no regulating the temperature of a running rmh.

 



Couldn't the house become uncomfortably warm?
 
thomas rubino
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Well, with an 8" J tube design and an exposed barrel, you would get a fair amount of radiant heat off the barrel. But burn time is only apx 45 minutes.    
The real heat is stored in the mass.

With a batchbox and a brick bell. Burn time is longer but with an all brick bell there is no super hot radiant metal.
That big brick box gets warm and stays that way, slowly releasing that heat for hours.

A masonry heater is the same principle.  However they are built with a second brick skin to guaranty no exhaust vents into the home.
 
 
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Hi Emilie,   As with most wood burning appliances a RMH is anything but a set it and forget it kind of thing. You ultimately become the thermostat.
As Thomas pointed out, the mass holds the heat for a certain period of time after the fire goes out but you get to know after a while how much fire is needed to maintain the temperatures your aiming for and of course adjusting to the weather conditions. There's no one right way to do it, that's why its a science....rocket science.
Each build is customized to the user(s) needs which can make it very interesting sometimes to problem solve another persons system!
Continue to ask questions. We are here to help or at least point you in the right direction.
 
It's a tiny ad. At least, that's what she said.
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
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