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Brianizing a table saw fence

 
pollinator
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Location: northeastern New Mexico
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One project that I really really need to move on is the fence for the table saw. Not having a functioning fence on the saw means the accuracy of cuts are sub-par. So a  lot of projects like the aquarium cabinet are on hold until I can deal with the broken fence.

I've seen several Youtube videos about building our own table saw fence out of wood. These seem like an egg before the chicken scenario. I'd need a good fence to build the intricate parts to create a high quality fence.  So yesterday, I decided I'd put my brain to the task and figure out what I could build with my skill-set and materials I have on hand.

First thing I needed was to dig around in the junk yard and see what I had for materials. I've decided to build the fence out of steel. I've got plenty of metal working tools and i should be able to get the accuracy of the fence adjustable with tapped threads and arc welded pieces where needed.
Table-saw-fence-modification-and-rebuild-parts-Sept-2018

Above is the broken piece that goes inside the fence which sorta held the fence square to the saw blade. This is where I will hopefully if I can execute my plan properly get much more accuracy. This thing with the jagged edge used to be a "tee" shape. It had tapped holes used for precise alignment of the fence. I need to reproduce that feature in the Brianized version. What I need is a thick piece of steel that will give a secure mount for the bolts that will hold the new improved "Tee"  of the fence square to the table.
A quick walk down the hill to some recycle stash resource piles and some through scouring and digging I found what I need in an antique tractor part.
Table-saw-fence-modification-and-rebuild-Sept-2018
This channel iron fits around the angle iron rails already on the table saw frame. I should be able to locate some bearings to make this slide easily over the existing rails. I was thinking skateboard bearings.  This metal along with the thick piece are soaking in rust remover.
I'll reuse the old fence as it has a locking mechanism built in that I should be able to modify to attach to the channel steel to keep the fence running straight with the table rails. I did a quick sketch of what I'm thinking. I don't know if it will make much sense, but I'll include it just the same as it did help me put all these pieces together in my head.
Table-saw-fence-modification-and-rebuild-Project-sketch-Sept-2018

I don't know if I'll have time to mess around with this morning as I have the final physical therapy session of the Summer and an evaluation.
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pollinator
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I appreciate your initiative and resourcefulness, Brian. 👍 When you've completed your table-saw fence project, how about posting it in this thread too?

https://permies.com/t/40/12412/projects

Sadly, people have been neglecting the thread.  And the general topic is important, IMHO.  Re-use, upcycle, create.
 
Brian Rodgers
pollinator
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Location: northeastern New Mexico
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Joel Bercardin wrote:I appreciate your initiative and resourcefulness, Brian. 👍 When you've completed your table-saw fence project, how about posting it in this thread too?
https://permies.com/t/40/12412/projects  
Sadly, people have been neglecting the thread.  And the general topic is important, IMHO.  Re-use, upcycle, create.



Awesome Joel, I'll do that. I'm a big fan of upcycling. I believe I have a lot of good stories I can post over there.  
I should have time after this weekend's stucco project to begin construction. I really need this fence on my saw as I'm already getting backed up on woodworking project ideas.
For example, I recently was gifted a large thermal-pane window. While visiting the neighbor and loading it up, they showed me their fancy new garage doors, which had increased the value of the storage area where the window was stored, to the point where it had to go.
I've been using screws to attach a set of  heavy wooden garage  doors to the door opening in my little shop ever since they were gifted to me ten years ago. The set was  missing a crucial spring so they won't function as they were designed to roll up and down.
You can see part of the door in the background of the image below.
I'd often joked that I always wanted an electric garage door, while using a portable drill to screw and unscrew the panels to the wall, haha, right funny.
I hate the idea of not recycling these old doors.
Anyway, the neighbor's new door are barn door style opening.

On our actual barn we have plywood doors made by us some forty years ago. A testament to longevity, I guess, but they are ugly, warped and difficult to open and close. So I always had that in my head about barn doors.
Now after seeing what professionally made barn doors are like, I think hope with the table saw operational I can make a set of doors that look nice, seal out the cold in Winter and best of all open without a drill-driver!
I just need that saw to not make every cut a challenge to setup.
It seems the bane of the upcycler  is dealing with the extra labor of working with a multitude of kooky idiosyncrasies involved with the project I spent so many hours improvising that it has to work or I look like a dope. Just like is the case with those beautiful antique doors where I have learned pretty quickly how to raise the 50 pound door panels in place by myself with a drill in one hand and me on one end, doh!  
Shop-lighting-Toolbox-mess-September-5th-2018.jpg
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