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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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I was at Cracker Barrel and looking at all the cool stuff on the walls. In a glass front display (which is why the pics are bad) full of building tools I saw these. The adjustable jawed plier things I can see how they'd work, but what were they used for?



And this pic is bad, but take a hook shaped tool, and roll the tip backwards... What would that be for? Didn't seem to have any of the edges sharpened.



Hoping someone knows, these puzzled me.
:D
 
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I'm pretty sure the top one is a saw tooth setter, though I haven't seen one like it before. Here's one from a quick web search made by Sandvik of the same style. The bottom one, I'm not sure. Maybe something for twisting or tying wire, or a specialty scraper like for cleaning putty out of cracks, maybe even a tool for working leather or something.
sandvikset.jpeg
sandvik saw set
sandvik saw set
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I was at Cracker Barrel and looking at all the cool stuff on the walls. In a glass front display (which is why the pics are bad) full of building tools I saw these. The adjustable jawed plier things I can see how they'd work, but what were they used for?



And this pic is bad, but take a hook shaped tool, and roll the tip backwards... What would that be for? Didn't seem to have any of the edges sharpened.



Hoping someone knows, these puzzled me.
:D



The first one is a saw set, used to set angle that the teeth of a handsaw lean out to the side;   and I think the other  one is a farrier's tool, for trimming hooves before shoeing. I think I remember using something very similar to that at Sturbridge Village when we shod the oxen.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Daniel Schneider wrote:

The first one is a saw set, used to set angle that the teeth of a handsaw lean out to the side;   and I think the other  one is a farrier's tool, for trimming hooves before shoeing. I think I remember using something very similar to that at Sturbridge Village when we shod the oxen.



Thank you!
I'm not certain the hook thing is sharpened though, I might be wrong, it was behind glass and I couldn't poke it, but I didn't notice sharpened edges. Can you explain how it would work? I'm always curious about things!! :D
 
Daniel Schneider
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Thank you!
I'm not certain the hook thing is sharpened though, I might be wrong, it was behind glass and I couldn't poke it, but I didn't notice sharpened edges. Can you explain how it would work? I'm always curious about things!! :D



Well, it's been 30-odd years (oh my gods,  it's been 30-odd years!), so don't quote me on this, but I think that after filing the bottom of the hoof,  you'd lay the tool flat on the bottom of the hoof, with the rolled bit over the edge of the hoof and pressing against the hoof's face, then pull the tool in the direction of the handle. The bit of therolled tip facing the tool's shaft would carve a groove in the face of the hoof, so that the tips of the shoe nails, when clenched over, would be facing in towards the hoof, with less chance of snagging things (like the ox's other leg) while walking. I also think the rolled bit was sharpened from the inside ( no clue why).
 
Jordan Holland
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Here's a neat one for Stanley tool collectors. It looks like the result of a wild night between a plane and a scraper. It had a very specific purpose which sadly no longer exists.
20210408_083227.jpg
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Interesting! If it weren't a shop tool, I'd suggest it would make a serious kitchen slicer - strong enough to get skin off winter squash!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Jay Angler wrote:Interesting! If it weren't a shop tool, I'd suggest it would make a serious kitchen slicer - strong enough to get skin off winter squash!


I thought the same thing, and I don't CARE that it was made as a shop tool! I repurpose a LOT of things.
But as to what it was made for.... I'm at a loss.
 
Jordan Holland
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Jay Angler wrote:Interesting! If it weren't a shop tool, I'd suggest it would make a serious kitchen slicer - strong enough to get skin off winter squash!



It likely would!
 
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It's a box scraper (AKA pullshave)!!!
Here is a picture of a modern pullshave from Veritas. "The Veritas pullshave was designed for hollowing or recessing an area; for example, shaping and smoothing chair seats. Our unique design is the result of taking a convex spokeshave and reconfiguring it with a handle and knob to make it both easier to use and better suited to rigorous work - there is no tool like it on the market. It will do the work associated with traditional inshaves and travishers."

It is the Stanley #70 box scraper. Here's one on eBay: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Antique-Stanley-70-Box-Scraper-13-1-2-Inches-Long-U/254905153239?hash=item3b5987f6d7:g:Mz0AAOSwaF1gUPQI

I never figure these things out. I'm so excited!!!
05P5073-veritas-pullshave-pm-v11-blade-f-0164.jpg
[Thumbnail for 05P5073-veritas-pullshave-pm-v11-blade-f-0164.jpg]
 
Jordan Holland
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DJ got it! Before the modern days of cardboard boxes, most things were shipped in those cool old finger-jointed wooden boxes. Labels were stamped on with paint. When the boxes were reused, this scraper was used to shave the thinnest layer of paint/wood possible (the wood was very thin to start with).  The new label could then be stamped on.
 
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Jay Angler wrote:
And just since no one has actually mentioned what a "clevis" or "shackle" is used for, we often use one to attach a chain or loop of wire rope to something else - we use them to attach two chains together or a chain to a hook, or a chain to a loop of wire rope because we can run wire rope through single or double pulley system or through a ratchet-puller, but if we need to go a long distance, wire rope has more stretch than chain does.
Just in case anyone looking at this thread is interested.



And to further the details, Shackles are primarily used in construction, rigging and lifting. A clevis is used in less demanding applications such as farming and towing. The purpose of the pin is to fasten through a hole in steel plate or a bumper or draw bar. So while they could be used to connect 2 chains, or wire ropes, it’s not really the correct or best way to do that (and yes, I’ve done it more than once, because of being in a hurry and grabbing whatever is handy!).
 
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Jordan Holland wrote:Since that one was so easy, here's one a little harder:



Looks like it could be used as a carpet stretcher?
 
Jordan Holland
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Larisa Walk wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:Since that one was so easy, here's one a little harder:



Looks like it could be used as a carpet stretcher?



Yep! It's a late Victorian carpet stretcher!
 
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Somebody gave me this.
tool.jpg
[Thumbnail for tool.jpg]
 
Jordan Holland
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Robert Ray wrote:Somebody gave me this.


Alligator wrench.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Jordan Holland wrote:
Alligator wrench.


How do you use it on the alligator?
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:
Alligator wrench.


How do you use it on the alligator?



With utmost care and courtesy!
 
Jordan Holland
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Carla Burke wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:
Alligator wrench.


How do you use it on the alligator?



With utmost care and courtesy!



Hahaha...yeah, you gotta tune 'em up every once in a while!
 
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These were from my big clean-up of our storage last year.

Fascinating stuff, took a long time to figure out what the one with the broken handle was for.



IMG_20200604_145017411_HDR.jpg
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is that a scoop (? lack of a better word) for picking plums?
Or is it stronger than it looks and is used for... digging clams or something out of the mud?
I want to know more about the thing in the picture next to the  flower arrangement-stander-upper-pokey-things (all my languages are failing me on this item), the thing with the string tied around it. It almost looks like a mold for casting!
As for the last picture, I sure hope you didn't get them from Pirate Pegleg Depot.
 
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Those spiky things are called Flower Frogs, used in the bottom of vases for arranging cut flowers
 
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Thanks Kim I couldn't figure those out.
I think the picture below them is for cobblers to hold shoes still while putting them together.
 
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Hard to tell the size, but if it is about the size of a pitchfork the one with the broken handle is probably for cleaning horse stalls. When the bedding is sawdust or shavings, you can do an easy daily cleanup where the horse apples and any wet clumpy bedding are retained but the clean bedding falls through.  
 
Carla Burke
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Andrea Locke wrote:Hard to tell the size, but if it is about the size of a pitchfork the one with the broken handle is probably for cleaning horse stalls. When the bedding is sawdust or shavings, you can do an easy daily cleanup where the horse apples and any wet clumpy bedding are retained but the clean bedding falls through.  



A litter box scoop, for heavy livestock!
 
L. Johnson
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That wasn't too hard was it... But the scoop is actually for rice paddies. They used them to weed the flooded paddies.

The thing next to the flower arrangement spikes is actually a pair of flower arrangement vessels or dishes. As are the two big white trays underneath.
 
L. Johnson
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craig howard wrote: Thanks Kim I couldn't figure those out.
I think the picture below them is for cobblers to hold shoes still while putting them together.



Yep. They take the place of a shoemaker's last for making generic shoes.
 
Pearl Sutton
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I gave apples out to Kim,  Craig and Andrea for correct answers, I had already hit Andrea when Lew said it was for rice paddies. I left Andrea's apples for the idea (in Carla's words) of a big litterbox scoop, and personally, I plan to use that concept. Makes a a LOT of sense to me!!
Good pile of pics Lew!

Oh wait, the thing with the string, Lew, is Terezea right? If not, say so, but don't tell us what it is, we'll keep picking at it. If it is right, Tereza gets an apple too :)
 
Andrea Locke
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Thanks Pearl, for the apple. Carla, I hadn't made the connection to litter box scoop and am still chuckling over that.

The modern version of the livestock litter box scoop looks like this
https://www.ukalcanada.com/en/metal-shavings-fork-with-wood-handle-129480100
But I can imagine a homemade version looking like that vintage tool and working well for the purpose.

I am curious to know how it is used for rice paddy weeding. Is it for digging out the roots of weeds? Would it not be easy to pull weeds rooted in mud covered in a layer of water? Is there enough room between the rice plants to insert a shovel like that? Apologies for the million questions but I know nothing about growing rice and am interested how it works and the utility of this tool.

Edited to fix the link.
 
L. Johnson
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Good pile of pics Lew!

Oh wait, the thing with the string, Lew, is Terezea right? If not, say so, but don't tell us what it is, we'll keep picking at it. If it is right, Tereza gets an apple too :)




Thanks, they puzzled me at first.

Sorry, I already answered :-/ I didn't play the game well.

I found another puzzler yesterday though, so I'll post that... and I don't know the answer, so it will be interesting to see who does!
 
L. Johnson
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Andrea Locke wrote:I am curious to know how it is used for rice paddy weeding. Is it for digging out the roots of weeds? Would it not be easy to pull weeds rooted in mud covered in a layer of water? Is there enough room between the rice plants to insert a shovel like that? Apologies for the million questions but I know nothing about growing rice and am interested how it works and the utility of this tool.



I have never seen them used, nor have I found any images of them being used. I found out what it was on a page of various old agricultural tools with labels... and that took extensive hunting.

From my general observations of rice growing, it's likely it was used to clear the edges of the paddies. The paddies aren't always flooded and some plants are as water hardy as rice, so I suppose the weeds might establish themselves in opportune times. I had another one of these tools that was slightly different, but I don't see any pictures of it in my photos.
 
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Last pic to the left, possibly an insert for cobbling shoes or soles?
 
Robert Ray
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These were in an old treadle sewing machine. There were news clippings from the  40's and even a voting ballot from 40.  They are not plastic you can see lathe tuning marks and the slots are hand sawn. The ribbon was initially attached and was elastic, it is sewn on to the ribbon through one hole. The little flower embellishment with seed beads is hand made.  They do not slide together. They appear to be ivory or bone. There is a bit of discoloration/stain on one in the top picture at the slot that is not a break it is something that stained the piece. I don't think it is a needle case due to the slots.

I initially thought "lace bobbin" but have never seen one in person, and the examples I have seen have never been attached together and seem to have a bit of weight to pull the string down.
20210418_174336.jpg
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Andrea Locke
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Hi Robert, I think you are right about them being lace bobbins and with the slots they are a style called church window bobbins. The slots are decorative not functional. The name comes from the shape being like a church window with light shining right through the bobbin.

I don't know why these were attached but I have a theory. Being only a pair they are not a full set and someone obviously went to a lot of trouble to make a nice attachment ribbon. I wonder if they were a keepsake maybe of a lacemaking older relative, who passed away and the girls in the family each received a pair of her bobbins as a memento? I can't imagine why else someone would have this?
 
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Apple for Andrea, not sure we'll get much closer.
I'm wondering if they were repurposed for something like the ends of a tie on a hood, to keep the string or elastic from slipping into the holes.
 
Robert Ray
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The connection of the elastic band was the confusing part. I wonder if there was another piece on the end for weight and making it longer. I bought the treadle machine for 25.00 and the drawers were full of vintage goodies.
 
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Anne Miller wrote:Pearl and Peter: great guesses!

1)      Three tube soccer fans plastic air horn

2)   Meike 3-piece Macro Extension Tube Set for Nikon (Plastic Version)



I will give a hint for #3:  Here is another pic

Cigarette roller
 
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The "handle looking thing" is a barb to keep your speared fish from wiggling off the spear.
Not appearing near the picture- I prob made some rookie mistake. Can't delete either, so enjoy.
 
They gave me pumpkin ice cream. It was not pumpkin pie ice cream. Wiping my tongue on this tiny ad:
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