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Does anyone know this plant? ** Skullcap

 
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I've tried a couple plant ID sites, but had no luck - must not be searching the right terms or something.  The flowers are about the size of sage flowers, fused petals.  I see now that I've got it uploaded close-up's a bit fuzzy - sorry.  Been flowering for over a month, so mostly gone to seed now.





(source)


Thanks!
 
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I don't know exactly what it is but...

It appears to have opposite leaves and every other pair is oriented in the same direction. It also appears to have a square stem. If I am seeing these correctly, combined with the structure of the flowers, I think it fits squarely in the Mint Family: Lamiaceae

It is a rather large family... Happy hunting!

Most mints have a strong aroma when the leaves are bruised. If you can tell us what it smells like, maybe someone can point you in a specific direction.
 
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Mint/Thyme family.
square stem, usual double lip flowers (usually purple), and paired leaves
 
Jan White
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Oops!  I should have mentioned - no scent.  Not even much of a green smell when the leaves are crushed.  although, now that I've read a little further, I see that the mint family doesn't necessarily have a scent.  I thought it did, so ruled that out.  Okay, well I'm happy with mystery Lamiaceae as an ID.

Thanks guys!  That was an easy one for you
 
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Could this be some kind of skullcap (Scutellaria)? The seedpods particularly make me think of that group of plants, which are also in the Lamiaceae.
 
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I think another clue for mint family is a square or hexagonal stem I don't know how broad in the family that trait is but it's certainly there in peppermint, apple mint, shiso, and lemon balm.
 
Jan White
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Heather Sharpe wrote:Could this be some kind of skullcap (Scutellaria)? The seedpods particularly make me think of that group of plants, which are also in the Lamiaceae.



Ooh, yes the flowers are very like skullcap, in that they all grow facing one side of the stem. Nice one, Heather!

The skullcap(s?) that are used medicinally don't seem to have the knotted roots, though.

I was looking a bit at the Stachys genus, as well, since crosnes and Florida betony are both Stachys. I haven't seen any that are particularly like my plant yet, though.

IMG_2048.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2048.jpg]
 
Jan White
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Northern bugelweed, Lycopus uniflorus, is common in my area and has roots like mine. From the few pictures I've seen, the flowers don't seem right, though. I'll have to investigate more when I have time.
 
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I’m guessing Side-flowering Skullcap Scutellaria Latiflora
Also know as Blue Scullcap, Mad Dog Skullcap.

Hardy perennial herb of the mint family and native to North America
 
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third vote for skullcap. since the post above me sounds reasonable, i will concur, i think too thats the most common variety by far and so is likely?                
but in general i am going with - some kind of skullcap
 
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Blue Skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora)
 
William Kellogg
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.
7140449C-716A-4ED0-A1CA-487720FC2BC7.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 7140449C-716A-4ED0-A1CA-487720FC2BC7.jpeg]
 
Jan White
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Thanks, William. S. laterifolia does seem to be the consensus. I'm not sure that's what's in the picture you posted, though. The paired leaves in the photo are growing on the same sides of the stem all the way up, rather than alternating.

Do you happen to know anything about the roots of S. laterifolia? Are they like the picture I posted upthread? That's the part that no one seems to mention in the plant description.
 
William Kellogg
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I must admit that is not what I would expect the root too look like. The lower root looks appropriate but the bulbous portion doesn't. Unless they are just really well fed, not being "in the wild"?
 
William Kellogg
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You could give this a try to be safe-

https://deltaleaflabs.com/services/species-id/
 
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