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Quick completely non-toxic housing

 
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This topic has been covered a little in previous threads about putting up a quick shelter to live in while building a cob house etc. I am also planning what to build quickly to live in while building cob, with the constraints that I don’t want anything toxic, so I am not going to live in an RV or anything like that. Also tents and yurt kits have too many chemicals for my taste.

So here’s my idea:

A tipi frame or dome frame. Covered with something.

Option 1.
Cover the frame with wool felt (there’s a company (called Sutherland I think) that makes totally raw wool felt with no chemicals, and you can buy 50-yard rolls of it).

But will the felt become waterlogged and sink and sag? How do traditional felt yurts do with rain?

Option 2.
Attach strawbales all around the frame and earth-lime plaster them for a quicky earth shelter.

But how would this hold up in the rain without a roof hanging over the bales and earth-lime plaster? I’ve seen strawbale geodesic domes but maybe they are onl used in hot dry environments?

Option 3.
Wooden tipi. Attach wood planks to tipi frame then maybe shingles on those.

Option 4 (variation of 1).
One layer of felt and one layer of cotton canvas waxed with beeswax-tallow-oil.

Option 5 (variation of 1).
One layer of felt and then attach brush/bark for a wigwam/wikiup exterior.

Also: will mice invade the felt? What about insects in the wikiup? Will I be creating brown recluse paradise?

Any advice would be most welcome.
 
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How about untreated lumber shed?
Shiplap siding, post foundation,sheet metal roof.
No plastics,but if sheet metal is too manufactured, maybe use slate.
 
Cayo Seraphim
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William Bronson wrote: How about untreated lumber shed?
Shiplap siding, post foundation,sheet metal roof.
No plastics,but if sheet metal is too manufactured, maybe use slate.



That seems beyond my carpentry/building  abilities! But great otherwise.
 
Cayo Seraphim
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One more option, if this would work?

What if I used an untreated wooden yurt frame and roof, and basically used the yurt lattice as wattle, and daubed onto the lattice to make a quick wattle-and-daub yurt?
 
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I think you quick solution may take longer yuan your main home.
I suggest you build one room of your home, move in, then build the next room, move in, then the next.
I would start with the bathroom, but don't fit it out, then the kitchen area, with limited fit out, then a small dining / bedroom.
As the work is completed, the room use may change and the old room finally fitted out.
IE first room has basic shower / bath , hand basin.
When the next room is ready, complete the bathroom as per the long term plan.
Ditto with kitchen etc.
You will be amazed how quickly it will move along.
 
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Cayo Seraphim wrote:

William Bronson wrote: How about untreated lumber shed?


That seems beyond my carpentry/building  abilities! But great otherwise.


I think you're not giving yourself enough credit.  Making a simple square building with studs and nailing ship lap or tongue and groove boards to is is pretty doable.  

Where would you be building this structure and would it need to keep you warm through the winter?
 
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