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Bulk foragables: the Big Box store of your foraging habits.

 
Posts: 32
Location: Palominas, az
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We have wild mustard greens everywhere here in SE Ariz, and I love them, in soups, salads, or just in my mouth as I'm walking.
I juice the prickly pear fruit, freeze it, then add to mineral water to make prickly pear soda pop.
We have lambsquarters but im.not crazy about the flavor.
Also alot of moth mullein, desert mallow, amaranth, sorrel, wood sorrel, dandelions.
We also have alot of lizardtail. Dont know if its edible to people, but my chickens LOVE it!
 
pollinator
Posts: 179
Location: Southeast Arizona, Latitude 31, Zone 8A, Cold Semi-Arid, USGS Ecoregion 79a
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Leila Blair wrote:We have wild mustard greens everywhere here in SE Ariz, and I love them, in soups, salads, or just in my mouth as I'm walking.
I juice the prickly pear fruit, freeze it, then add to mineral water to make prickly pear soda pop.
We have lambsquarters but im.not crazy about the flavor.
Also alot of moth mullein, desert mallow, amaranth, sorrel, wood sorrel, dandelions.
We also have alot of lizardtail. Dont know if its edible to people, but my chickens LOVE it!


What do you do with the moth mullein? Are its uses (edible and medicinal) similar to common mullein? Thanks, neighbor!
 
Leila Blair
Posts: 32
Location: Palominas, az
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Moth mullein is a good respiratory tea. I have COPD, so I ad it to the desert mallow, lemon balm and yarrow I have growing and make herbal ice tea.
 
Posts: 267
Location: On the plateau in TN
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In TN we have plenty in yard to forage on IF we needed to.
Wild garlic plenty, dandelion (at least two varieties! Carolina, and common), plantain is appearing, purple dead-nettle plenty, hairy bitter crest plenty, chickweed too, along with pesky indian mock strawberry
 
pollinator
Posts: 195
Location: Charlotte, Tennessee
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Michael Moreken wrote:In TN we have plenty in yard to forage on IF we needed to.
Wild garlic plenty, dandelion (at least two varieties! Carolina, and common), plantain is appearing, purple dead-nettle plenty, hairy bitter crest plenty, chickweed too, along with pesky indian mock strawberry



We enjoy the smilax/cat brier shoots this time of year. It tastes kind of like a lemony asparagus. Unfortunately, the frost last week killed off all the new sprouts.

https://greatoutdoordinary.com/2017/03/12/sauteed-greenbriar-catbriar-bullbriar-smilax/
 
Posts: 20
Location: Castro, Chile
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I'm on an island in southern Chile whose climate is a lot like the Pacific Northwest. Wild berries abound:  blackberries and a myrtle berry called "murta," which has a hint of juniper to it. And NO ONE PICKS THEM. Needless to say, I've been taking full advantage of the bounty while being able to maintain physical distance.

I have a couple of contacts in town that might be able to advise me on other forage opportunities: I'll see what they have to say, if anything.
 
pollinator
Posts: 335
Location: New Zealand
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I recently foraged barberries for the first time. They are DELICIOUS!
 
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