• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

possible idea for $$ from herbs

 
                    
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am reading "Under the Tuscan Sun" by Frances Mayes (great book, by the way) and she mentions making pestos from herbs other than basil.  It never even occured to me that a person could do such a thing!  She makes lemon-parsley pesto for fish, arugula pesto for pasta or crostini, mint pesto for shrimp, and sage pesto for white beans or grilled sausages. 

They are made the same way as "regular" pesto, with olive oil, garlic, and pine nuts.  How clever is that?  Also, easy to grow and fairly inexpensive to make!

I bet these pestos would sell great at a farmer's market.  Somebody want to give it a try?
 
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lambs Quarters aka Wild Spinach came up like crazy in our garden last year. It was probably the number one 'weed', second to grass. So instead of yanking it all out we made a pesto and sold it at markets, using our own garlic and marjoram. We used sunflower seeds instead of pine nuts, which we will be growing ourselves this year. No possibility of home grown olives unfortunately.

The pesto sold fairly consistently and was well received by our customers. We gave out samples on nacho chips, which really helped sales.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i love making pestos out of things other than basil. id have to say one of my favs is nettle pesto, around this time of year when the fresh shoots are coming out mmmmmm
 
                    
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh, those are great ideas!  I should be able to try the nettle pesto in a few weeks in my area.  I will try the sunflower seeds, too.  Much better than using the pine nuts in the bins at Winco, which are imported from China (I asked).  Thanks!
 
Posts: 124
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just made a really good nettle pesto. Make sure you put it in the food processor, not a weaker blender so it chops up enough. Not really for the stings, but to take away the unpleasant furry texture.
 
Posts: 131
Location: Prairie Canada zone 2/3
49
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

IdahoFolk wrote:
Oh, those are great ideas!  I should be able to try the nettle pesto in a few weeks in my area.  I will try the sunflower seeds, too.  Much better than using the pine nuts in the bins at Winco, which are imported from China (I asked).  Thanks!




If you had the space, you could grow a pine nut tree - there are several varieties that yield, with cold tolerances down to zone 2.  We've ordered some, as we wanted a few pine trees anyways, and this way we also get a yield...
 
pollinator
Posts: 940
Location: Stevensville, MT
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My fave is green garlic pesto:)
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm ordering some pine nut trees as well but of course they take a few years to yield significant amounts of nuts.
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
103
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In my climate  "a few years" till you've got pinenuts would be a bit of an understatement, since it's around 25-30 years till the trees produce at all, and at least 50 till they really get going.
Beautiful trees for the grandkids to enjoy!
 
Travis Philp
gardener
Posts: 965
Location: ZONE 5a Lindsay Ontario Canada
11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hmmm thats a shame. The nurseries around these parts claim that their korean pines will start yielding at about 4-8 years of age.
 
Posts: 192
Location: SW of France
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think pine nut will be to time consuming for harvesting and uncraking it, no ?

few years ago we made a pesto from olive oil, basilic, nettles and wallnut, not very good (cause of nettles i think)

Real pesto has parmeggiano too
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
318
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Genovese pesto has Parmesian cheese.  It is not as common in other pestos.
gift
 
Unofficial Companion Guide to the Rocket Oven DVD
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic