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So, what's your favorite "adult beverage" ???

 
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This means a) you are of legal age where you reside b) the beverage does have a proof rating c) whether you home brew or purchase.

If you c) homebrew share a few bits about your making thereof.

And please share how you would prefer, or usually do, enjoy said adult beverage?

Me, though I brew ale and beer, make mead, and vint wine, I am now reluctantly allergic to all. I did have my paternal grandfather start to do all in the Prohibition era (you WERE allowed to make 400 gallons a year for your own consumption!) and I got all his recipes plus as a small thing, helped him make some stuff, and in later years tried his recipes and found them good.

Currently, I admit to Jaegermeister, I purchase it, and usually one doubleshot at a time (1.5 oz times two). It helps with some of my chronic pain and helps me sleep. I take it room temp and in company of real or virtual friends (chat).

I do a wicked bock ale (as I call it, because of the yeast I use) and am waiting on the hops vine I planted to cover the fence and hide the fugly of the neighbor's yard, and give me beer makings.

A balloon/gallon wine that smells and tastes like tropical punch koolaid and is totally beautiful for doing oven roasted chicken marinades.  I have a BURGEONING grape crop this year forming up...

Back to it, what's your favorite adult beverage?
 
master steward
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I am disappointed that no one else has replied.

I had planned to try wine with all my blackberries but they dried on the vine and I only got about 10 berries which I added to the liquor from the 3 berries from last year.

So I turned my enthusiasm into searching for something else to make.  I am afraid of what I make turning out to be vinegar so I found this:

https://permies.com/t/67786/kitchen/Making-Pruno-aka-Prison-Wine

There might be other recipes out there under different names.  This was what I found first.  I am waiting until my company goes home after July 5th to start.
 
gardener
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Beer does not like me and Wine gives me wicked hangovers.
If I indulge, it's usually vodka.

Vodka and Seven up with a bit of lime
or better
Vodka with pink lemonade

Or since it's summer and the heat is rising, a nice vodka slush can be fun.

9 cups of boiling water
2 tea bags
1 - 12 oz frozen lemonade
1 - 12 oz frozen orange juice
1 cup of sugar
16 oz vodka

Dissolve the sugar in the water
Add tea bags and soak
Remove tea bags
Add everything else
Freeze

For serving, scoop some in a glass and top with fruit juice or a clear pop (sprite, seven up, something lemon or lime-ish)
 
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Absinthe

In the last few years I've learnt some trick on shinning.  This year I started planting the herbs I need to make my own. IF all goes ways by 2018 I will have my own local Absinthe.

Next after that will be Gin.

 
Justyn Mavis
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I forgot my favorite New Years, or  Midsummer Eve Party drink.

Chatham Artillery Punch

Chatham Artillery Punch
1 ½ gallons Catawba wine
½ gallon rum
1 quart gin
1 quart brandy
1 ½ quarts rye whiskey
½ pint benedictine
2 quarts maraschino cherries
1 ½ gallons strong tea
2 ½ pounds brown sugar
1 ½ quarts orange juice
1 ½ quarts lemon juice
4 ounces fresh pineapple chunks
1 case of champagne or so

Mix wine and next ingredients let sit for 2 months in a cool dark place.  (Add one case of champagne when ready to serve).  Serve over ice.

Yes, it's worth it. Really. it is.
 
Deb Rebel
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Justyn, I met something similar in my first pass at college. Thank you for the recipe. It is good and it is worth the wait. I've got some really big carboys now, so near the holidays I might try it. Though I won't be imbibing. (the 'anything remotely related to grapes' allergy developed in that first time, long story, the alternative, I'd rather have the allergy)  Added, that makes 8 plus gallons of fluid to park and wait and my carboys are only 7, so a split batch would do it...

 
Anne Miller
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Justyn Mavis wrote:I forgot my favorite New Years, or  Midsummer Eve Party drink.

Chatham Artillery Punch

Mix wine and next ingredients let sit for 2 months in a cool dark place.  (Add one case of champagne when ready to serve).  Serve over ice. .



Justin, do you use an airlock or just cover it with something?
 
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I'd love to find some local crafted non GMO whiskey but the goal is elusive. I've settled in to Wild Turkey, as it is one of the rare non-gmo production whiskeys. It used to be listed on the label as non GMO but the backlash from their GMO suffering customers caused them to remove that statement. Wild Turkey is surprisingly palatable on the rock (2" square ice cube). I'm low key with nightcaps 2 drinks is a big night, as such I can budget for more expensive local craft options if they were only available.  On the GMO subject I've almost entirely written off beer. Assumptions can be made when choosing beer but it takes diligence to sort out who is making the microbrews, many of them have been bought by bigger companies who use GMO to make them. They keep the folksy labels so the public doesn't know the ownership changed. And some microbrews could be using GMO anyway even if they are a small company.

I should just brew my own.
 
Deb Rebel
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Josh Kunkel wrote:I'd love to find some local crafted non GMO whiskey but the goal is elusive. I've settled in to Wild Turkey, as it is one of the rare non-gmo production whiskeys. It used to be listed on the label as non GMO but the backlash from their GMO suffering customers caused them to remove that statement. Wild Turkey is surprisingly palatable on the rock (2" square ice cube). I'm low key with nightcaps 2 drinks is a big night, as such I can budget for more expensive local craft options if they were only available.  On the GMO subject I've almost entirely written off beer. Assumptions can be made when choosing beer but it takes diligence to sort out who is making the microbrews, many of them have been bought by bigger companies who use GMO to make them. They keep the folksy labels so the public doesn't know the ownership changed. And some microbrews could be using GMO anyway even if they are a small company.

I should just brew my own.



It's not that hard. Plus, if you grow your own hops, this is a wonderful way to cover a fence and block out neighbors. Two with one. Just be very good about cleaning and sterilizing everything, preparing your wort properly, and take detailed notes so if something isn't right you can figure it out. My first few batches were AWFUL. If you have a good friend that has made their own, try to recruit them so you get it down. Though it isn't hard... and I found buying good equipment was worth it.

(Edit, typo. Just washed my hands and can't do a thing with them)
 
gardener
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Shandys.
Lemonade and beer. So refreshing.

But my favorite was a batch of brew that started as lemonade and tea and became a five gallon cooler of booze.
Continually added to,I included bits of fruit, juices, teas.
Boosts of sugar,ice and yeast, plus infusions of beet kvass.
It was tasty, relaxing, never gave me a hangover...
I was drinking it every night, something I'd never done before. My wife said something to me. Twice.
Down the drain it went!
 
Deb Rebel
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Dandelion wine is interesting, just to make some. I helped my grandfather make a batch when I was four, he sent me to pick yellow (open) flower heads and I got well over a stuffed glass gallon jarful. Taste I remember was sort of winey and sort of 'green'. Just green. It wasn't much more than a balloon wine, but still. It taught me if you can ferment it you can make wine of it.  I'm sure if you went the other way with a longer ferment, different yeast and actually bottled, racked, and turned it, you could get something civil in a few years....
 
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What's a "balloon wine"? Anything like this batch of fermented apricot juice a friend of mine made here a few years ago?

By the way, we thought it tasted better after the first few days of fermenting, and didn't like it as much after it had sugar added for further fermenting.
Apricot-cider-airlock-1.jpg
Apricot-cider-airlock-1
Apricot-cider-airlock-1
Apricot-cider-airlock-4.jpg
ballon airlock fun
ballon airlock fun
 
Deb Rebel
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Usually balloon wine is made in a gallon glass jug, and the balloon is to allow the pressure of gases formed during fermenting to be able to vent a bit to lower pressure, yet keep unwanted spores and that OUT while the stuff is 'cooking'. It could very well be that the apricot juice was sweet enough, and adding more turned it into a higher alcohol and poorer tasting product. When the balloon 'deflated' your batch was done. It could take a week to a month to have it go through inflate/deflate, most stuff I made for cooking wasn't much over a week.
 
pollinator
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Junmai Ginjo Nigorizake, a really yummy rice wine variety that tastes like a pina colada and riesling had a lovechild.

Also the Armalite Cocktail, a cocktail of 1 shot of McCormick Whiskey in a pint glass, topped off with Guiness. Because If you're already going to drink, why not get smashed?

Also also, my own liqueurs (the ginger pear, spiced peach, spiced rum, and New Orleans style rectified whiskey are my favorites) and meads made with love in my kitchen.

 
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Tea. It's really too good to share with children.
Then there's ginger beer, that should never have been a childhood drink.
 
gardener
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Penny's post mentioning vodka and pink lemonade reminds me of a summertime drink we used to enjoy. Vodka, Ruby Red grapefruit juice and a splash of Concord grape juice, on ice.

This evening (when it's 5:00 somewhere) I'll be having "cheap champagne". $7 a bottle at most stores around here. A favorite of mine.

I've not tried Dandelion Wine, but here's my mom's recipe for anyone interested. I inherited her recipe box. It doesn't seem very detailed, but maybe it'll be of use to readers who understand the process. I don't.
IMG_20170728_150805.jpg
Dandelion Wine
Dandelion Wine
 
Deb Rebel
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That is really close to my grandfather's recipe. Only thing is to put a big balloon on the jug you pour the stuff into to cook for those 21 days. Fasten it on with several wraps of string and tie tight or a really big rubber band. If you leave it open it will mold. Let it cook for 21 days in a cool dark place that you won't scream if it pops balloon and festers over. Check it frequently. Rinse out the jug carefully with boiling water (give the jug a hot water bath and warm it up first) as you want things really clean with brewing and vinting, then pour in the liquid to cook up.
 
pollinator
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I love me a Bitburger Pils, bitte ein bis! but in Germany, not the USA export stuff but I dont dislike it either.

I like sweet baby jesus for craft beer.  https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/1924/88269/

Rolling rock for regular USA beer.

Fiji Bitter is a great beer but I only found in Fiji and the local beer in Cluj Napolca in Romania was very good too.  Their wine was excellent but the sulfates will hurt the head.

for Whiskey, Makers Mark and few handful of years ago I learned about real good tequila, not the typical stuff and is on a whole other level but I rarely drink the hard stuff.

Now I am thirsty haha.
 
pollinator
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You are all going to laugh at me but I used to HATE wine (thought it tasted like rotten grapes... lol). And I intentionally worked on acquiring a taste for wine because I want to be able to make my own 😂I can grow pretty decent grapes in this area so I wanted to learn to like it and I DID. Took me about a year or so to kind of settle in but I love the stuff now. I think the big problem is I don't usually like sweet beverages but most "starter" wines are kind of sweet so it took me a while to find one that didn't taste so "rotten" but wasn't so sweet.

So, while I've never made any of my own alcoholic beverage, I like a nice dry wine or a stout beer. We have so many good microbreweries out here that I haven't even had a chance to try them all.

Having said that, from a permie standpoint I'd like to figure out how to make a white merlot which is my favorite type of wine but is kind of rare. And someday when I get bees I'm gonna try making mead. And of course, I will WILL WILL absolutely try brewing my own beer someday.

I also would like to try alternative fruit wine, we love raspberries and the golden ones are rampant in my garden. I'd love to make a wine with both red and golden raspberries. I think it would be delicious and I bet it would be a lovely peachy color.

I used to enjoy more mixed drinks but I tend to lean towards beer or wine these days. I love a nice red mulled with spices in the winter or a cold beer in the summer. I think when I'm doing mixed drinks my favorite is a greyhound (Vodka and cranberry).
 
Deb Rebel
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I have some mead laid down, despite me having a major honey allergy, that seriously needs like 40 years to age. It's getting there. It's at 32 and counting. Someone is going to really enjoy the good stuff in another decade. A small Scotsman I met in college, and his father was a firecracker and his mother just lovely, and he had the recipe and we all made a batch or three of it. I wonder if I still have it... hm. Edit: the recipe, I wonder if I have it. I do have four jugs of it gathering dust.
 
steward
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Wow, I'm impressed with the knowledge folks have here of brewing their own!

Some day, I would love to make folk wines from cherries, plums, berries, or other fruit that we grow or mead. One of our gappers here made a huckleberry mead one summer that was absolutely fantastic! I have a soft spot for cherry wine - I might like it better than most red (grape) wines.

I've had dandelion wine, and it was okay, though I tend to prefer fruitier, darker, earthier wines. The herbalist who shared her dandelion wine with me (see the recipe here) picks the yellow blossoms/petals out of the green casing of the flower head - uses only the yellow part and discards the green part - so hers was extra light and mellow like a sweet, pale white wine.



From a quick skim of the other dandelion wine methods here, is that not as common? Do others include the green part of the flower head?

For a mixed drink, I like a light mojito, and I've had a shandy where it was 7-up and beer, not lemondade and beer, though that made beer tolerable to me. (So not a fan of beer.)

I found this thread trying to find a place to post this most ridiculous picture of a bloody mary:


(Pic from this article.)

Yes, that is a pepperoni stick straw.

I'm not at all interested in a bloody mary (I've never been a fan of tomato juice), but I want to buy this drink for someone I know just because it is SO CRAZY. I'm not entirely sure it qualifies as an adult beverage, despite the vodka.


 
Deb Rebel
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It is. It's meant as a drink and a meal. If you have already had a bunch of adult beverage and have hit 'snackies' this is perfect. Keep the buzz going and service your munchies.  

Make your own it's a lot cheaper than buying one at one of those places that makes them. Bartenders just LOOOOOOVE those stupid fancy schmancy drinks. They so do LOVE putting one of those together that you can dawdle over for forever.
 
pollinator
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I prefer Wine, Good Hard Cider, and Mead.  This is a great post I was thinking a while back that, for me, part of the natural evolution of forest garden is fermentation.  

After that initial thought, regarding fermentation, I purchased a bunch of Mead books and started reading.  My favorite is "Make Mead like a Viking."  Love it!   The Author talks about all of the herbs that have been found in the beer-like beverages and the mead found in archeological digs.  Very interesting reading and an inspiration.

I purchased 15 lbs of local honey and plan on making Mead this weekend.  My forest is young so I don't have enough of anything to ferment in-house.  

I'm going to try using natural yeast as suggested in the book. Basically mixing water and, honey then setting it in the garden. Part of what the book talks about is how spiritual fermentation was back in the day, they didn't really understand the why, but they figured out the how.  

Most Viking homes had a spiritual mead stick or a log, if a big batch, that was used over and over in batches of fermentation.  Basically, the yeast stayed in the cracks and crevices of the wood and aided in the next fermentation.  

So my favorite beverage is anything with a good back story that connects me to the past.  

Cheers.

 
Deb Rebel
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The grapes are coming in. I have some blackberries I juiced. A friend gave me some plums in return for grapes. I have apples. I think I need to make my tropical punch wine, plus some without grapes (they don't like me). Ooooh goodiegoodie. Yes, gallon jug balloon wine. Still good stuff.

I need to dig for my recipes and go snitch the groups of grapes hanging there so nicely and the last of the apples. Hm.
 
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i like fresh wines, made out of table grapes or fruits. About 3 days after the start of fermentation is wonderful. Yeasty, carbonated, a hint of sweetness. Mmmm. Mmmm. Mmmm.

I like fruity wines. So made out of sweet table grapes, and not bitter wine grapes. More like a white or pink wine than a red. Made dry when mature so that I don't have to add preservative. And made with natural yeast without anti-biotics.

One of my favorite meals ever is served during muskmelon season. The pre-dinner appetizer is a a glass of muskmelon wine. Followed by a salad seasoned with muskmelon vinegar.  The after dinner desert is muskmelon fresh from the garden. What a joyful dinner. Odoriferous and tasty.
 
pollinator
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Beer. Lovely wonderful beer. Made from local grains and whatever splendid bittering herbs happen to be growing near the brewer. We have a local brewery around here (Humboldt Regeneration Brewery and Farm) that makes amazing Gruits (unhopped beers) as well as tasty brews of every description. They grow and malt their own grain and brew with the most local ingredients they can find. True beer that respects and represents it's herbal source is the best drink I can think of.
 
Karen Donnachaidh
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For an after dinner drink or a warm your toes on a cool evening snifter, I do like my struth. But, I haven't been able to find buttershots or hazelnut liqueur for awhile now, I can only find schnapps. My mix tastes weak.

Struth
2 parts Buttershots liqueur
1 part Hazelnut liqueur
1 part light rum
 
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Penny, and those who are into fruit liqueurs made with vodka, don't forget about Limoncello, that Italian classic summer drink with the amazing color and flavor.   This is nice enough to give as a gift.

Limoncello    (takes 4 1/2 to 5 days to make, but it's worth it)

   10 very clean lemons  (8 lemons works, if that's all you've got)  (lemon juice is not used in Limoncello)
   1 (750 ml) bottle vodka  (inexpensive vodka, as the lemons will overwhelm any flavor in vodka)
   3 -3 1/2 cups water  (4 Cups is okay if you want to have less alcohol with each drink)
   1 1/2 cups sugar (used on the 4th day only)  (this is the least amount of sugar that works well, or add more to taste)


1.   Wash lemon rinds well.  If not organic lemons, scrub with vegetable brush under water, rinse well.  
    Using a vegetable peeler, remove very shallow strips of peel from the lemons.  
Try not to include the white pith as it is bitter.   (Peels can also be frozen for future use in a tight plastic bag if you are not ready to make the Limoncello.)
    (Juice the lemons and freeze juice for future use).

2.   Place the lemon peels in a 2-quart pitcher (Sun Tea-sized container).
     Pour the vodka over the peels and cover with plastic wrap.
    Steep the lemon peels in the vodka for 4 days at room temperature.

3.   ON DAY 4:  Heat the water in microwave in a large glass measuring cup or glass bowl.  It does not have to be boiling. Add sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves, a couple of minutes

4.    Cool completely. Pour the sugar syrup into the vodka mixture. Cover and let stand at room temperature  overnight or 6 hours during day.
   
5.    Strain the limoncello through a mesh strainer. Discard the peels.

6.    Transfer the limoncello to bottles. Seal the bottles and refrigerate until cold, at least 4 hours and up to 1 month.

7.  Limoncello is traditionally served in small amounts in tall shot glasses or small aperitif glasses.
 
Ryan Hobbs
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This has no alcohol, but I would still definitely not give it to minors. It is used medicinally by the Matses Tribe of Peru.

It is a type of tea made primarily of Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis among other herbs. Posting an exact recipe is illegal where I live, but you can easily get recipes online hosted in places where it is perfectly legal. Using it is in a legal grey zone in the US. Drinking it is not enjoyable in the moment, but it tastes earthy and woody. I go with about 2/3 cup now but my first one was about 1/4 cup. The experience is intense. You probably don't want to use it more than once a year. It literally changes the structure of your brain. Normally, your sense of self is scattered around in little pockets in your brain. The sense of self completely dissolves during the experience and comes back as a single consolidated region.

 
gardener
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I really like hard apple cider and I'm looking forward to making my own later once my apple trees get going. I first had hard cider in England where it's much more common than here and I really enjoyed it. Now it's my go to adult beverage. Though I do enjoy a nice glass of red wine with my wife from time to time.
 
gardener
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Diet Coke.

Hey -- I'm an adult --- I can drink what I want.

At my last annual checkup, the doctor said that I tested positive for DC.  If it's a preservative, I'll live till I'm 700.
 
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sorry to be a hater ... you are all perfect
i wanted to put this out there though

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcohol_and_cancer
 
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I make a liquour from a rare fruit ,wich im convinced im the only one in the world that drinks it.
Nitraria Schoberi fruits added to a strong moonshine made from plums and double distilled ,plus somme sugar.

Ive quit drinking a few years ago but this is for special ocasions.

At home i have my own distillery from copper and i make quite a lot of moonshine from plums and from wine when it gets bad ( every year actually because i dont treat the wine with sulphites) .
Im trying to sell it after and in the past 15 years or so i didnt even tasted the wine im making,nor do i drink more than 300 grams of moonshine liquour per year.

With beer was another story and it made me alcoholic after ive drinked it because it has a lot of caloryes and its easyer to drink a few beers than eat a lot of food.
I was running a lot ,looked like anorexic and toght the beer will help wich it did but at a cost( had to take xanax and then Serlift to quit the xanax).
 
Ryan Hobbs
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When I was drinking alcohol (I quit 14 months ago), my favorites were Bourbon, Irish Whiskey, and Moonshine. "Beer is good, but liquor is quicker." as they say. That said, I very much enjoyed them. If I just wanted to get drunk fast, then any spirit would have done. But I liked to experience the flavors and mouth feel. I made a clone with improvements of SoCo out of the moonshine which I used to pay my yard people. It was so sought after that one time when I called the company, all of their crews showed up and gave me the royal treatment. I gave them all a shot of it, and grilled some chicken and made rice. At the time I was dating a Cebuana and the chicken was Cebu Style with the onion, garlic, calamansi, black pepper, soy sauce, and unrefined sugar.
 
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I don’t drink much these days, but I do enjoy home-brewed beer (or “gruit” for all you ale purists) or simple country wines.

This year my partner made a few litres of huckleberry country wine, which turned out delicious!

I’ve also been quite inspired by Pascal Baudar’s The Wildcrafting Brewer, but I’ve only experimented with a few recipes so far.

Last winter I made yarrow/salal dark ale which turned out fantastic. It was super smooth, with the slight aroma and bitterness of yarrow, with the unique flavour of salal berries and molasses.

In the coming weeks I’ll be starting my next batch using mugwort, bog cranberries, alder sap, and  reishi mushroom — all wild foraged.

The primitive-style “gruits” are surprisingly simple, and I like that they don’t conform to the pretension of craft brew or beer culture. Free style beer!
 
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I have a lot of hops (cascade, wllammette, mt. hood) growing on trellises around the porch and over the sun-facing windows, and do a fair amount of brewing when they're bearing. Unfortunately my home-brewing skills seem to have deteriorated compared to earlier periods in my life. Sometimes I also make a bunch of gallon jugs of hard cider out of store-bought juice and vintner's yeast, because it's so cheap. In the summer I generally like crisp, hoppy pale ales or wheat beers (especially saison) with fruit infusions. Years ago, I was more into stouts and porters, but now I mainly just get a sixer of Guinness to have with my corned beef boiled dinner on St Paddy's Day.
 
Kevin Carson
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Re liquor, I generally do bourbon or Tennessee whiskey on the rare occasions I indulge. The best I ever had was Booker's, which is a private reserve of the Jack Daniels family somebody bought me a few shots of at a restaurant. I think it's about 130 proof, but so unbelievably smooth you'd never guess it. Obviously you need to be careful with it because it WILL sneak up on you.
 
Kevin Carson
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Anne Miller wrote:   I am afraid of what I make turning out to be vinegar....]

There was a local newspaper story about a guy who took up homemade wine as a hobby. The first batch, the poor fella used second-hand barrels he later found out had been used to store vinegar.

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Kevin Carson
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Daron Williams wrote:I really like hard apple cider and I'm looking forward to making my own later once my apple trees get going. I first had hard cider in England where it's much more common than here and I really enjoyed it. Now it's my go to adult beverage.



You can also make apple jack from it, which is a freeze-distilled brandy. Just leave the cider outside on freezing nights and throw away the ice on top -- repeat until it's as strong as you like it.
 
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New feature in my favorite bulk food department is cacao nibs. These are small pieces of the cacao been that results from breaking the bean and sifting out the hulls. so it has no treatment or additives. It still has the white chocolate fat in it.  Grinding it fine and adding boiling water will make a creamy hot chocolate drink
 
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