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collinear hoe, wire-weeder, or cobra-head weeder?

 
Posts: 152
Location: Southern New Hampshire (Zone 5)
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This will be my second season growing annual vegetables in our community garden.  Last season we had a lot of success and great yields, but I spent far too much time on my hands and knees, pulling out weeds.  Purslane, lamb's quarters, rye grass, etc.  I just need to give my plants a head-start, as the weeding labor decreases significantly once their leaves shade the bare soil beneath.

I plan on using straw to cover the bare ground, but I know weeds will still come up through, with ample sunlight and irrigation in the community garden.

I have a stirrup hoe to doing broadscale weeding (in the pathways), but I plant densely, and need something with more precision to pick out the weeds growing near young seeds and transplants.

I see Johnny's Seeds selling a colllinear hoe, a wire-weeder, and a cobra-head weeder.  All sold for cultivating and weeding row crops.

Has anyone used both and could recommend which one would be best for my small (20'x10') row-based annual garden plot?





 
steward
Posts: 5698
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I've used the first two hoes. They are OK. The third one looks really clever for working in dense plantings.

My favorite hoe for close-up weeding is shown below. It was cut from a standard garden hoe with an extra long handle.



hoe.jpg
[Thumbnail for hoe.jpg]
My favorite close-up weeding hoe.
 
Davis Tyler
Posts: 152
Location: Southern New Hampshire (Zone 5)
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so many choices!  Your triangular shape looks like it could handle some light-duty dirt-moving tasks, as well as weeding.

I should also mention the soil I'm growing in is very sandy loam.  The collinear hoe description states it's good for rocky soil, but there's hardly any rocks in my soil.  Very little clay either.  It doesn't clump up or hold water, but it's easy to move around.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Posts: 5698
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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My primary hoe, that I use for most tasks in the garden, including weeding, planting, furrowing, and irrigating. It is also cut from a standard garden hoe. The narrower width reduces the effort required to wield it, and applies more force to the ground/roots, so I can use it all day long without tiring. It also has an extra long handle. I don't have to stoop over to use it. I sharpen my hoes with a file, so that they are more like knives, and less like hammers.



beans-hoe.jpg
[Thumbnail for beans-hoe.jpg]
My favorite hoe.
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