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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
pollinator
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Gross, we certainly don't do any of that.
 
gardener
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Some things are best left unknown :)
 
gardener
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Well done Gerry - I'd hate to think exactly what is in the pellets they're injecting, the bit on the web that I found isn't exactly saying. That said, if someone was smart, they'd make chips the same size and shape for tracking animals.
 
steward & bricolagier
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Hey, my neighbor has been cleaning out stuff, and there was a sewing machine case in her driveway, about to get rained on. I asked if I could have it, she said "yes!" It's got a sewing machine in it (I'd have taken just an empty case too, honestly, I have case-less machines) It's got one of these in it:


(Picture off the net, not this one, this same model etc though)

Morse 6300 sewing machine. Is anyone cleverer than me, and can find me a date on this beastie? I see "vintage" and I see them for sale, but I don't know what years they were made for a range of age dates.
Don't know yet if it works etc. Haven,t got that far yet.
Cool old sewing machine! Wondering how old...

Edit: Hey! It works! Got some nasty exposed wires, I tested it insulated and with it on a surge protector,  but worth rewiring. Cool!

 
Jay Angler
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...and to think there are probably people out there who'd be sewing fabric masks if only they had a sewing machine, and someone just put it out to get rained on. That is such a sad commentary on today's world.
 
Gerry Parent
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Did you tilt up the machine from the base and check the name plate? Sometimes you can get the info you need there or on the motor.
 
master steward
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That Morse 6300 sewing machine looks a lot like my Singer so I am guessing about 1963.  I am trying to remember when my mil bought mine though I think about 1963-64.
 
Anne Miller
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The facebook group has the manual so check their files:

Posted March 4

I see that someone had uploaded a manual for this machine in 2017. Well we have 2 manuals of the same machine here in our group.



https://www.facebook.com/groups/118136551553861/

I had fun looking at all the different models.  Some really beautiful vintage machines.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Gerry Parent wrote:Did you tilt up the machine from the base and check the name plate? Sometimes you can get the info you need there or on the motor.


Haven't gotten that far yet. I need to open it today, rewire the nasty stuff, and clean it well. (Also have to rewire my favorite drill today) so I'll see what's in there.

Anne Miller: That's a good guess, that's about what I'm thinking too. I finally found the post on March 4 about manuals but they aren't visible to me, I have no FB account, I don't know if that's part of it or not. I found a manual online for something close, I know the right manual have to be out there, I saw pics of the same machine on that page, manuals have to exist.
I agree, lots of cool machines on that page!!
The lady who was getting rid of this showed me a treadle machine she has, oooooh, PRETTY!! My treadle machine looks like it has worked hard all it's life, this one looks like it was used and very well cared for. Loved it! I looked at the serial number, it's lower than mine, my machine is a 1926, I'm thinking hers is a 1923 or so.

THANK YOU!
:D

 
Anne Miller
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On the facebook group, on the left hand side it has this:

About
Discussion
Members
Events
Videos
Photos
File

At the bottom it has "file".  I click on it and at the bottom is "Morse FA630 Deluxe_ZZ.pdf"

I do have an account for the grandkid so maybe that is why I can see it.  I don't like to download stuff otherwise I would download it and email it to you.  I wonder if you could get to it with the permies facebook acct?
 
pioneer
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Decided a giant, thin, cotter pin with a hinge would be useless, so... ?
what-is-it-1.jpg
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what-is-it-4.jpg
size reference dinner fork
size reference dinner fork
 
gardener
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It's for tightening/ loosening canning jar rings. Most are now coated with rubber, and that one may have been, at one time - but rubber dry rots & crumbles.
 
Jay Angler
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Yes, and it's *really* hard to find that style any more and it's on my wish list if I ever spot a second-hand one!
 
pollinator
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This "tool" was left in my shed by the former owner of my house - I cannot figure out what it's for!?

Steel "head" on a wooden 4ft pole - anyone have any ideas?

IMG_3605.JPG
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Gerry Parent
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The dirty curved end provides a bit of evidence that it could be a homemade hoe made from a simpson strong tie plate.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Or a gutter cleaner. I agree with "home made" and "strong tie."
 
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Paint scraper?
 
Carla Burke
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I'm betting it was used by Jack, to scratch the giant's back. Ok, I've no idea - but all 3 posts before mine seem entirely plausible.
 
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I agree it’s a homemade hoe or scrapper made from a strong man plate
 
Pearl Sutton
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At a second hand store today I bought this. I think I know what to do with it, it's diagonal, you use it to shape beds for planting. But what's it's name? I have no clue! The lady at the register needed to write something down on the receipt to identify it, said "what do you have there?" I said "uhhh..." She looked at it. "Huh. Shovel!" and wrote down shovel. That was as far as she cared to consider it.

Blade is curved, with teeth. It sits on a diagonal to the handle, so if you pull straight, you are moving dirt to the left. Like a come along, with teeth, on a diagonal :) It's well made, very sturdy metal and handle. Well worth the 10.00 I paid, I think!

Anyone know it's name? And whether I'm right about it's function?


 
gardener
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I could be wrong but those teeth look awfully close together for garden work. And short.
I *think* it is a concrete groover. After you pour a sidewalk, cattle ramp, or whatever you use this tool to make grooves so it's not so easy to slip on. (that's my guess, anyway).

(I suppose it could be just to make concrete decorative. I tend to look at practical applications first. LOL)
 
Pearl Sutton
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Hm. That's an interesting theory! Why would it be diagonal then? It's at about a 45 degree angle.... And it's cupped, curved toward the tines....

 
Tereza Okava
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hmmm. curved to make rainbows, or dragon scale patterns in your concrete? LOL

 
Jay Angler
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When I first read Pearl Sutton's description of the tool, I immediately thought "concrete work", but I've not experience in the field so I didn't suggest it. Tereza Okava suggested "non-slip", but there's also the possibility of wanting it to drain water in a certain direction, or simply to make it decorative. Ceilings used to have all sorts of swirls in their finish plaster which had multiple purposes - bouncing light and making little defects less obvious for two.

Where are our permies concrete experts - hmmm... thin on the ground since we encourage alternatives?
 
Pearl Sutton
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I really don't think concrete finishing. And I have done concrete, and have tools for grooving etc, it's not familiar to me.  
It has a define scoop shape that ends in the tines, and that 45 degree angle between the head and the handle. I'm wondering if it's a potato hiller or something similar, moves and smooths the dirt.
I can take better pics, I was tired and sloppy last night...
 
Jay Angler
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Yes, potato hiller has potential - the curve really isn't obvious in the picture.
 
Carla Burke
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Maybe it's a gutter rake
 
Pearl Sutton
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Second set of pics, mom holding it up.
From left to right: the angle of the head, the scoop of the tines, and what you see when you are looking down it like you are using it.



Heavy beastie, definitely not a gutter rake. Would brain you! Handle attachment is made to use a straight inserted slight tapered handle, taper toward the ground, and the loop it goes through is good sized, bigger than a modern shovel handle. Heavy handle, heavy head. Made to work and never break.  

It's being a good challenge at least :D

:D

 
Jay Angler
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The idea of it being a trencher keeps sneaking into my brain. The scoop shape would help you draw dirt out of the trench and trenching takes tough tools. So would clearing plants off the bottom of a mucky pond? The teeth would help hold the plant roots while the gaps let water drain?
 
Anne Miller
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I think is a long handled tile trowell and those teeth are to make the grooves in the grout.
 
Gerry Parent
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Until you decide what to use it for, I would use it as a back scratcher; Long enough to get those hard to reach places and ergonomically angled just right to catch most iches in one pass.  
 
Pearl Sutton
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Sasquatch grooming comb!!
:D
 
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That is a barb made to go into the prey but not to be able to back out.  what goes in, does NOT come out!
 
Pearl Sutton
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Don Hed wrote:That is a barb made to go into the prey but not to be able to back out.  what goes in, does NOT come out!


Hi Don, Welcome to Permies!
The barb thing was long ago! We are 17 pages into this thread at this point! Currently we are puzzling over a tool I bought, I'm about to post an update on it. if you scroll back up this page, you'll see pictures of it. Any guesses? And check below this post, I'm going to post again in a bit.
And yes, the barb thing was identified as I think an eel catching fork, if I recall correctly!

 
Pearl Sutton
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Sorry for delay, been busy. I took the thing outside and ran it through dirt (not effective at all, although it wasn't good fine dirt) and through the yard. Grass slides right through it, clover leaves mostly slide right through it, it rips plantain up badly, but doesn't pull it out, but it really neatly takes the heads off the clover. I looked up water weed rakes and it's too small of a head for that, although that was my best guess. If a plant was the right type, it would pull it by the roots really easily. Looks like a custom made tool, for something, but I'm stumped as to what. Clover beheader is an odd niche, doubt that's what it's made for :D
 
Jay Angler
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Pearl, your tool isn't a Sasquatch grooming comb, mine is! I'll start with just a picture, and give the minuscule hint that I've got for a second post!
 
Cheryl Gallagher
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A raddle, for a weaving loom?
 
Jay Angler
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Cheryl Gallagher wrote:A raddle, for a weaving loom?

It arrived with a bunch of miscellaneous and incomplete loom parts, so I suspect it was used for something like that at least. If anyone wants to see the puzzle I was handed by a neighbor, go to this thread: https://permies.com/t/141647/permaculture-fiber-arts-tools/fiber-arts/Counter-Balance-Loom

There isn't a verdict yet whether I can rehabilitate the poor thing, as there's a bunch missing.
 
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Cheryl Gallagher wrote:A raddle, for a weaving loom?


I'd say that's definitely what it is
 
Jay Angler
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The raddle came with a heap of loom parts and some things which I don't recognize. Since you guys did so well with the raddle, do you have *any* clue what the pieces of wood in the picture below could be? There are 16, some have bolt holes, not all the same length, but seem to have pairs or 4-somes that are the same length.
any-ideas-welcome.jpg
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This looks like a job for .... legal tender! It says so right in this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
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