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You know you're a permie when...

 
Ellendra Nauriel
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When, during harvest season, there are no open flat spots in your entire house. Including the floor!
 
Kate Muller
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You know you are a Permie when you are still finding uses from things you bought for your wedding 11 years ago.   My husband and I had a very large family wedding. Instead of renting polyester table cloths I bought bolts of 108" wide unbleached cotton muslin for less money knowing I would have uses for the fabric in the future.  

Since it is the end of summer we are not shopping much these days I discovered we didn't have any paper bags in the house. I needed something to bundle my lettuce plant tops so they could finish drying out and no longer be in my way in the garden.   I grabbed a remnant of one of my remaining cotton muslin table clothes from my wedding and used them to bundle up my lettuce seeds stalks.  This piece of fabric has been used to frost protect my plants in the past and it was also used to teach several teenagers basic pattern making skills when they wanted to make a mascot costume for our FIRST FRC robotics team.  Once I have harvest the lettuce seeds it will be washed and put back into my fabric stash to be used for some other project.  Other table clothes have been used other parties, tie dye workshops, sewing patterns, and other uses.  I Still have a good sized pile of this fabric and a good chunk of it will be uses to line the Roman shades I want to make for all the windows in my house.





Here is a photo of the costume the kids made.

 
Jay Angler
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Kate Muller wrote:

You know you are a Permie when you are still finding uses from things you bought for your wedding 11 years ago.

We bought green fabric for our wedding. I turned it into a huge stack of "Christmas Present" bags, many of which are still being used 30 years later. We had a friend I gave 5 to. They celebrated Christmas with 3 different groups of people, so those sacks got used 3 times each year and the garbage it saved was incredible.
 
Kate Muller
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Jay Angler wrote:Kate Muller wrote:

You know you are a Permie when you are still finding uses from things you bought for your wedding 11 years ago.

We bought green fabric for our wedding. I turned it into a huge stack of "Christmas Present" bags, many of which are still being used 30 years later. We had a friend I gave 5 to. They celebrated Christmas with 3 different groups of people, so those sacks got used 3 times each year and the garbage it saved was incredible.



I love this.  I will be making a bunch of gift sacks and totes for Christmas this year.  It is going to be a very hand sewn Christmas this year.
 
Amy Arnett
gardener
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Location: Nara, Japan. Zone 8-ish
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When emptying pockets for laundry yields a pile of seeds.

When you have more pictures of plants on your phone than your own children.

When your browser seems slow so you get to work closing the 40+ tabs of 'Permies - Recent Topics'.
 
Tereza Okava
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You know you're a Permie when.... you are obsessively monitoring your security cameras to make sure the sun is falling just right on the tray of baby seedlings you just put outside under new shade cloth.
(Sure boss, really I'm working!)
 
Carla Burke
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When you remember a couple different things you weren't able to get seeds for, and make a special trip to the store, in hopes they'll have what you're looking for in an organic, so you can harvest the seeds.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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When you get the mail and you laugh... I was sent seeds, and the sender reused one of the cool looking Baker Creek seed envelopes. I laughed, because I sent seeds to someone else a while back, and I reused one of the cool Baker Creek envelopes also!
Wonder what percentage of those get reused?

 
May Lotito
pollinator
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I used to frown at black walnuts all over the grass, piling them up to rot in a corner of the yard, this year I  am harvesting them for both nuts and dye. I have hulled over 400 and there are still more on the tree.
 
Paul Sofranko
Posts: 56
Location: western NY (Erie County), USA; zone 5b/6a. Can't exactly tell where the boundary line is.
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...a friend of yours on Facebook posts the frustrations of hanging lace curtains and decides to just discard them, and you suggest that ”lace may be compostable.”
 
Heather Olivia
pollinator
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You consider cruising alley ways with your partner "rescuing" useful items from people's trash to be a romantic outing. And then giggle together about being trash pandas.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Heather Olivia wrote:You consider cruising alley ways with your partner "rescuing" useful items from people's trash to be a romantic outing. And then giggle together about being trash pandas.


Me and one of my exes called dumpster diving "going on a date." "What do you want to do tonight?"  "Let's go on a date!" "Ok! Got the gloves and bungee cords?" "You KNOW I do!!"

:D
 
Carla Burke
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When your dogs toys come from your fabric scrap bin.
 
Carla Burke
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When you wake up in the morning, excited to have a breakfast of yogurt you (or your spouse) made from whole, raw milk, with granola you made, and jam you made, and eggs your own chickens laid.
 
Yasmin Hussain
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You know you're a permie when a sunny, breezy day comes and your first thought is, "YES! Perfect day to do laundry!"

-then my mother is a permit:)
 
Heather Olivia
pollinator
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When you set up a vinegar trap for fruit flies in your bathroom and feel bad, cause all those fruit flies are just going to waste. Then you rejoice when a rather large funnel building spider sets up its web over the fly trap, catching them and eating them instead! No more waste! And then you name the spider and tell people not to bother her or be scared, even though she's a foot from the toilet.
image.jpg
pet spider :)
pet spider :)
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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I have to admit I took a spider out this morning. One of the big black and yellow garden spiders... Making a lovely huge web right above my desk. Um, no. She's now out in the garden.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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You know you're a permie when....
upon leaving in the morning, your husband says "uuuh, look under your flip-flops, I think there's a worm?". You go look, it's a wee snake.
You immediately rescue snake, do the happy dance, take pictures and share with your peeps. The majority get hysterical about OMFG-snake-in-your-house, but you think it is the best day ever. Snake goes out in the garden to eat termites (it is a worm snake, flowerpot snake, blind snake) and to generally make the garden beautiful. This is why we do it!
[snake was maybe 12 cm/5 in long. Gorgeous. 2nd I've found here, but the first in a flipflop]
WhatsApp-Image-2020-10-05-at-08.04.47.jpeg
worm snake!
worm snake!
 
Jay Angler
master gardener
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Thereza Okava wrote:

Snake goes out in the garden to eat termites (it is a worm snake, flowerpot snake, blind snake) and to generally make the garden beautiful. This is why we do it!
[snake was maybe 12 cm/5 in long. Gorgeous. 2nd I've found here, but the first in a flipflop]

Totally awesome Thereza. I admit I've not yet found a snake in my house, but I adore seeing them outside and have been known to relocate them in the hopes they'll eat a few slugs in places I don't want slugs. (Yes, I know slugs are useful in the ecosystem, but they've almost completely eaten my 2 young kale plants I started, before the poor plants got large enough to support a hungry slug. Slugs seem to particularly adore kale!)
 
Tereza Okava
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You know you're a permie when your neighbor says, "Hey, I've got this garden hose full of holes that I kinda ran over with my car, I saved it because I figured you'd want it."

Me: "YESSSSSSSSSS THANK YOU THANK YOU" *happy dance ensues*

(my neighbor is just like me. "It's full of holes, I ran it over.... but it's still a good hose!" I do really like the people in my neighborhood, the overlap between permie and old-time thrifty is really nice.)

So now I have a nice holey hose to help in my greywater irrigation efforts (supposed to be a dry summer this year).
 
John F Dean
master gardener
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Hi Tereza,

Yes!  I love it when someone comes by and says " I've got a couple of dozen pallets. Do you have a use for them?"  I always have a use.
 
Kate Downham
gardener & author
Posts: 1927
Location: Tasmania
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When your 5 year old is outraged when she sees someone throwing clothes out at the tip and says "they should have mended them!"
 
John F Dean
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....because it is 3 in the AM and I am sitting in the living room unable to sleep because I am worried if my high tunnel made it thorough the first hard freeze of the year.  If it did make it, I have fresh salad into December. No more freezes are predicted
Staff note (John F Dean) :

Everything made it OK.

 
Nicole Alderman
master steward
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Location: Pacific Northwest
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Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
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Nicole Alderman wrote:When you see a picture of a cell, and your first though is, "Is that a color-enhanced aerial view of a permaculture farm"


Technically, the cell IS the basis of all permaculture, so yeah, it IS a permaculture farm. :D
Awesome pic!

 
Pearl Sutton
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You know you are a permie when you are all excited because it's leaf season, and you are taking the neighbor's leaf piles away. They would rather not have to burn them as they usually do.

And you know you are in a snarky permie mood when they say "Thanks for doing my yard work!" and you reply "Thank you for giving me all of your soil fertility!" just to see the look of puzzlement.... :D

It's sad, the soil out here has so much potential, but the leaves have been gathered and burned so long, and the grass mowed to within an inch of it's life, that the topsoil erodes off, and there are few bugs. This yard had more butterflies this year than the entire rest of the neighborhood put together. When I colud see spider webs in the grass due to the dew, I looked across  the area, and there were almost none anywhere else.

But, hey, I am rescuing all the leaves I can!! And enjoying my butterflies.

:D
 
May Lotito
pollinator
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My neighborhood is windy so nobody bothers to deal with the leaves; just let the wind blow them away. I have about 20 mature trees and by spring tine, not a single leaf will stay behind. I used to be happy with it, less yard work to do! Now I see it as a big loss in organic matters and soil fertility. This year I am doing the followings: let the grass grow tall to trap more leaves; leave a large wildflower patch as is; rake some to make leaf mold, mostly maple; and till late in the season with more oak leaves on the ground, thread and mulch them to return fertility to the yard.
 
May Lotito
pollinator
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May Lotito wrote:let the grass grow tall to trap more leaves;



My yard and neighbor's yard, you can surely tell where the property line is.
P1110096.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1110096.JPG]
 
Ellendra Nauriel
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May Lotito wrote:This year I am doing the followings: let the grass grow tall to trap more leaves; leave a large wildflower patch as is; rake some to make leaf mold, mostly maple; and till late in the season with more oak leaves on the ground, thread and mulch them to return fertility to the yard.



Windbreaks and snow fences might help, too. They would create zones where the wind deposits leaves for you, instead of blowing them away.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Clearing the neighbor's yards of leaves (they think it's great that I'll do it, I think it's great I can have all those leaves they usually burn) and singing an old song. The version I know was done by Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians, somewhere in the 1930's, but the original is an Italian song that is much older.



The lyrics to the Guy Lombardo version:

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my window
It's the butcher boy and oh
He's got a bundle in his hand
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window
Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I gotta da pork chop!
I gotta da lamb chop!
Ya want ta marry me?

Oh! Ma-Ma!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the butcher boy for me!

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my windows
It's the baker boy and oh
He's got a bundle in his hand
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window
Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I gotta da fruitcake!
I gotta da cheesecake!
Ya wanna marry me?

Oh! Mama!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the baker boy for me!

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my window
It's the fisher boy and oh
He's got a bundle in his hand
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window
Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I gotta da codfish!
I gotta da wigfish!
Ya wanna marry me?

Oh! Mama!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the fisher boy for me!

Then there's the version I made up and was singing as I worked:

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my window
It's the herbal guy and oh
He's got a package in his hand
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window

Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I gotta da basil!
I gotta da parsley!
Ya want ta marry me?

Oh! Ma-Ma!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the herbal guy for me!

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my windows
It's the mulchy guy and oh
He's got a load in his truck
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window

Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I gotta da leaf mold!
I gotta da compost!
Ya wanna marry me?

Oh! Mama!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the mulchy guy for me!

Mama dear come over here
And see who's looking in my window
It's the permie guy and oh
He's got a shovel in his hand
Tell me why he winks his eye whenever he goes by my window
Daughter, daughter he's in love and you're in love
And love is grand

Hey, Marie!
I'm digging the swales!
I'm planting the fruit trees!
Ya wanna marry me?

Oh! Mama!
Oh, get that man for me!
Oh! Ma-Ma!
How happy I will be!
Tra-la-la
And cheery-beery be!
Oh, if I'm gonna marry,
It's the permie guy for me!


I think my version has MUCH more interesting men!
:D


 
Carla Burke
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When your cheap, 15yr old, pos harbor freight drill finally dies (in the middle of a big project, of course), and you can't bring yourself to throw it out, because there's just GOTTA be SOMEthing you can do with it...
 
Tereza Okava
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You know you're a permie when.... you realize that that recipe for homemade mouthwash shares the same ingredients as your homemade deodorant.
It's.... the stacking dance......
 
Heather Olivia
pollinator
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Location: Central Indiana, zone 6a, clay loam
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You watch the Secret of NIMH again as an adult and are struck by how well it sheds light on the horrors of tilling. All those poor little animals and their homes imperiled by the plow! You remember how many times you watched it as a kid and have to wonder how much of a role it played in your becoming a permie. Then you start scheming about how to casually suggest to your friends with children what a great movie it is...
 
Pearl Sutton
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When I'm glad that if my neighbors won't change their habits, they at least don't care if I gather their leaves, take stuff from their trash etc. I'd love for them to be more aware, but I can only change myself, so I just consider their lifestyle a harvestable resource.
 
Len Whittaker
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May Lotito wrote:

May Lotito wrote:let the grass grow tall to trap more leaves;



My yard and neighbor's yard, you can surely tell where the property line is.



Haha. I feel like such a freak where I am right now. EVERYONE rakes their leaves (not to mention the city paid leaf blowers who come around the main streets). I found one house in a 3 mile area that didn't get rid of their lovely leaves.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Len: Welcome to Permies, lot of people here who feel like freaks!
I classify my neighbors as a harvestable resource!
Bricolage projects I have a large pile of leaves here now... They look puzzled, but let me take all the leaves I want. Less work for them, lots of leaves for me!
 
Len Whittaker
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Len: Welcome to Permies, lot of people here who feel like freaks!
I classify my neighbors as a harvestable resource!
Bricolage projects I have a large pile of leaves here now... They look puzzled, but let me take all the leaves I want. Less work for them, lots of leaves for me!



Thanks for the welcome, Pearl. I LOVE your "drag chute".
 
Michael Moreken
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Location: On the plateau in TN
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May Lotito wrote:I used to frown at black walnuts all over the grass, piling them up to rot in a corner of the yard, this year I  am harvesting them for both nuts and dye. I have hulled over 400 and there are still more on the tree.



I cut down the walnut trees surrounging my house on South, East, and West so put my garden on North side of house!
 
Christopher Shepherd
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When your neighbor has rag weed 2 stories tall in his front yard and you don't mind at all, but your visitors do.
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