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Juglans regia - Walnut - stimulating growth

 
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Hello,

I have just planted a 6m high walnut (Juglans regia) coming from a nursery.
I would like to know some measures, to improve the soil (soil activity and water permeability) as the soil is very wet and not so much alive.
e.g. mulching, beneficial plants, etc.

Thank you
 
pollinator
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I wouldn't use mulch if it's already too wet. I'd like to know how to stimulate them too. Pecans like nitrogen but don't know about walnut. That's a huge transplant.
 
pollinator
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Here's a study saying that the autumn olive - elaeagnus umbellata are very good companions for walnuts: http://gabrielhemery.com/2010/09/28/a-walnut-trees-best-friend/

6 m is a huge transplant... Better make sure it also has huge roots. (Is it 6 feet maybe?)
 
Ken W Wilson
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CRT, it's good to know that. I was going to try autumn Olive but couldn't figure out if Juglone would be a problem. I planted dwarf redbuds from Oikos instead.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Any suggestions for a ground cover that will stimulate them or at least not compete with them that can stand the juglone? One of mine is a seedling. The other is grafted on black walnut. I want to reduce mowing with useful plants as much as possible.
 
Crt Jakhel
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White clover should be OK under a walnut tree (but not crimson clover). From what I've studied so far juglone becomes a problem very gradually - see here: http://www.slideshare.net/Aliki85w/a-review-of-suitable-companion-crops-for-black-walnut - under the heading "Spatial and temporal buildup of juglone". By the time it starts having an effect the walnuts should already have grown nicely. This makes sense because juglone being a problem is an effect of walnut roots being well developed and wide.


 
Crt Jakhel
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Ken W Wilson wrote:CRT, it's good to know that. I was going to try autumn Olive but couldn't figure out if Juglone would be a problem. I planted dwarf redbuds from Oikos instead.



Although the source document for the elaeagnus idea ( http://www.futuretrees.org/archive/papers/40-clark-j-a-hemery-g-2006-the-use-of-the-autumn-olive-in-british-forestry-qjf-1004-285-288/file ) does not mention it explicitly, others say it is actually susceptible to juglone. So it's my impression that the autumn olive is planted as a nurse plant for the young walnut trees and will eventually fade away. However, see previous post about the slow buildup of juglone toxicity.

I've just planted some young walnut plants and plan to add elaeagnus developed from this year's cuttings in 2016. So let's talk about this again in 5 years or so

This link provides details about the experiment and findings reported in the futuretrees one: http://forestry.oxfordjournals.org/content/81/5/631.full

Here's an older walnut-elaeagnus document from Canada: http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/pubwarehouse/pdfs/9087.pdf - among other things it is interesting because it shows that, in a 10-year period, 1) elaeagnus was again the best nurse plant and 2) whereas alder had dieback at the end of this period, elaeagnus did not.

 
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