Win a copy of 5 Acres & a Dream this week in the Homestead forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like we have a stack of things not identified! The policeman, Ryan's little thing with a hole, my metal shelf... Let's add another to the pile!

At a thrift store today I saw these, they interested me, I pad 50 cents per bundle for them, 3 bundles. Each bundle has 2 of the hooked parts, and one bar. No obvious way to make them hook together solidly, the end hooks on the bar are loose if you hook them over the hooky parts, the spaces aren't the right size to hold, the crack on the bar doesn't let the hooky parts through. They don't seem to work together at all. What on earth did I drag home?! I'm puzzled.



 
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That kit is to add a clothes rod to a closet; another tier, to hang skirts under tops, or other configuration like that.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Carla Burke wrote:That kit is to add a clothes rod to a closet; another tier, to hang skirts under tops, or other configuration like that.


That's what I thought, and why I bought them. But they don't go together. They won't hold anything. It's all wiggly and floppy, no matter how I assemble it. I thought it would just lock together, it doesn't. What am I doing wrong?  Maybe it needs more pieces?
 
master steward
Posts: 11365
Location: Pacific Northwest
4825
hugelkultur kids cat duck forest garden foraging fiber arts sheep wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got my grandparents' old closet contraption like that. I'll try to see if staring at mine will help understand yours. It's in my kids' bedroom, so I won't be able to check until tomorrow.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:That kit is to add a clothes rod to a closet; another tier, to hang skirts under tops, or other configuration like that.


That's what I thought, and why I bought them. But they don't go together. They won't hold anything. It's all wiggly and floppy, no matter how I assemble it. I thought it would just lock together, it doesn't. What am I doing wrong?  Maybe it needs more pieces?



They tend to be wiggly & floppy, until they have a relatively balanced weight of clothes on them. I've had some that were so pathetic, I gave up on the cross bar, and just used the vertical pieces to put hangars through, on their own.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I mean like... If I put the cross bar in the way it looks like it goes, it can flop 1/2 inch each way. It sits at a 45 degree angle. Maybe I'm missing parts.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:I mean like... If I put the cross bar in the way it looks like it goes, it can flop 1/2 inch each way. It sits at a 45 degree angle. Maybe I'm missing parts.



That's all the parts I've ever seen them with...
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Carla Burke wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:I mean like... If I put the cross bar in the way it looks like it goes, it can flop 1/2 inch each way. It sits at a 45 degree angle. Maybe I'm missing parts.



That's all the parts I've ever seen them with...


Odd. They look well designed, well made, I can't imagine making them to not work right. They could have saved money in manufacturing by making it smaller so it works right. If this is what they are selling, they need to redesign it, they are wasting a lot of metal for no good purpose. I'm puzzled.
 
gardener
Posts: 1744
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
581
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sounds as if you could try making some wooden spacers to take up the slack? Or at least block some of the wobbliness?
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:Sounds as if you could try making some wooden spacers to take up the slack? Or at least block some of the wobbliness?


If I have to I'll get weird at them. They just look like they should work... but don't.
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yup. They're weird & poorly designed. Pearl - maybe you could make your fortune, on a redoux!
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Carla Burke wrote:Yup. They're weird & poorly designed. Pearl - maybe you could make your fortune, on a redoux!


I can design it. You market it. I hate sales :)
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:Yup. They're weird & poorly designed. Pearl - maybe you could make your fortune, on a redoux!


I can design it. You market it. I hate sales :)



Hmmmm...
 
Posts: 613
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
173
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Okay, this may be too easy, but ...



The-Thing.jpg
The Thing
The Thing
 
Posts: 164
Location: Dayton, Ohio
51
forest garden foraging urban food preservation fiber arts ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

F Agricola wrote:
Okay, this may be too easy, but ...




Isn't that a nut cracker?
 
F Agricola
Posts: 613
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
173
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ryan M Miller wrote:

F Agricola wrote:
Okay, this may be too easy, but ...




Isn't that a nut cracker?



Perhaps it could be used for that - coconut?!

But, sorry, no.
 
Posts: 7350
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1267
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think it's something to help remove tight jar lids?  
It even looks like there is a space for smaller lids...

I want one
 
F Agricola
Posts: 613
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
173
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Judith Browning wrote:I think it's something to help remove tight jar lids?  
It even looks like there is a space for smaller lids...

I want one




BINGO!

Someone please give the lady an Apple!

Yep, I use it regularly - it's probably the best low-tech device in the kitchen.

It covers four sizes, from very small to big, so pretty much all domestic jars.

 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7350
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
1267
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

F Agricola wrote:

Judith Browning wrote:I think it's something to help remove tight jar lids?  
It even looks like there is a space for smaller lids...

I want one




BINGO!

Someone please give the lady an Apple!

Yep, I use it regularly - it's probably the best low-tech device in the kitchen.



I've had various ones that don't work so well, including a wooden handled one with a leather strap that fits around the jar lid and can easily adjust to different sizes.  I had hopes for that one but it did not work for me.  I used to always be blaming my husband for screwing the lids back on too tight and have finally realized its all me and years of weaving wear on my joints.

I'll have to start looking for one like yours...
 
F Agricola
Posts: 613
Location: Australia, New South Wales. Köppen: Cfa (Humid Subtropical), USDA: 10/11
173
transportation hugelkultur cat forest garden fish trees urban chicken cooking woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Extra-Wide-JAR-OPENER-Containers-Bottle-Lid-Twist-Flexible-Multi-Tool-RRP-24/182655294142?epid=25004808686&hash=item2a871a9abe:g:X7QAAOSwpTJbuJ07

FYI: That's about $US20 delivered. Kinda expensive, but lasts a lifetime.

 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Judith: check the second hand stores. I have one, I know I have seen others.
It's a good jar opener for small lids, but I don't like it for large ones (which is what I have most issues with.) My favorite for big lids is an oil filter wrench from Harbor Freight, only works on big jars, but does them LOVELY!
 
pollinator
Posts: 101
Location: SW Washington
17
duck forest garden chicken
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It opens on the side is all I know.
received_419207528997942.jpeg
It opens on the side
It opens on the side
 
gardener
Posts: 2749
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
487
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We need more pictures!  
Very heavy casting. Looks like it was made to lift out of its cradle.  
What does the inside look like ?
Sort of resembles old mining equipment , but I don't think its that.
Don't see a drive system but it sure looks like it rotates.
Yup, definitely need more photos
 
Sally Munoz
pollinator
Posts: 101
Location: SW Washington
17
duck forest garden chicken
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

thomas rubino wrote:We need more pictures!  
Very heavy casting. Looks like it was made to lift out of its cradle.  
What does the inside look like ?
Sort of resembles old mining equipment , but I don't think its that.
Don't see a drive system but it sure looks like it rotates.
Yup, definitely need more photos



I will try to get some! A friend sent me this picture asking what I thought it was since I'm a chef and he thought it might be kitchen related.  My first guess was rock tumbler.
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
666
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know what this is, but it will be fun to see if others know. It was found in a house I'm working on. It was purchased at Burning Man in 2014. It came with a case.

The first picture is self-explanatory and just a thing that I found in the house yesterday. I'm giving it to my friend who collects this sort of thing. It's either from 1944 or 1945 since that's when Phil Harris was the co-host. An actual soap opera. The show featured mostly big bands and the commercials and name of the show all had to do with selling shampoo, laundry soap and dish soap.
20191204_105942.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20191204_105942.jpg]
20191204_092350.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20191204_092350.jpg]
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dale: You can get them all kinds of places...
a hint to others: We have a thread on permies that discusses them!  
Good one, Dale :)
 
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: New Zealand
21
hugelkultur purity forest garden books cooking woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes I know what that is Dale 😂.

I found this in the shed at work.
It's not something I've ever used but I suggested we make it a staff initiation ritual..  
IMG20191203162844.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG20191203162844.jpg]
IMG20191203162852.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG20191203162852.jpg]
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 1744
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
581
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Drew's tool appears to be for tattooing numbers onto an animal's ear - probably cow-sized from the can enclosed which would provide the ink I'm guessing.
 
Posts: 54
Location: Ontario, Canada
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Would the big round one be some kind of grinder?  It just looks awfully heavy to handle.  
 
Mary-Ellen Zands
Posts: 54
Location: Ontario, Canada
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is it a leather punch?  
 
Mary-Ellen Zands
Posts: 54
Location: Ontario, Canada
6
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Seeing the milking station from J Grouwstra from Friesland brought back some wonderful memories from my childhood.  My Opa and I crossing the Dutch countryside and investigating all the things I didn’t know about. When we came across one of these remote milking stations. My Opa stayed till milking time to show me how it worked.  I loved it!  I dreamed of having one of these in Canada when I grew up.  I did have a milking machine but nothing as fancy as the one in the photo.  Also it was for goats not for cattle.  Mostly I milked by hand. Quicker clean up. The cows I did milk were by hand. I don’t think the highland would like the noise of the milk pump.
 
Dale Hodgins
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
666
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The item I showed earlier is something that allows women to pee while standing. This might work outside of the nightclub or at a place like Burning Man where this one was bought. I suspect that it could actually be useful for women who do extreme sports like skiing or rock climbing, where it can be very impractical to get into the standard position. On a long climb , it is sometimes necessary relieve oneself while suspended by ropes.
20191204_092412.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20191204_092412.jpg]
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dale Hodgins wrote:The item I showed earlier is something that allows women to pee while standing. This might work outside of the nightclub or at a place like Burning Man where this one was bought. I suspect that it could actually be useful for women who do extreme sports like skiing or rock climbing, where it can be very impractical to get into the standard position. On a long climb , it is sometimes necessary relieve oneself while suspended by ropes.



Or hiking, motorcycling, or even just working out on the 'back 40', or traveling any place where the facilities are 'suspect'.
 
Jay Angler
gardener
Posts: 1744
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
581
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
@Carla - have you actually used one of them? If I didn't tend to already have full pockets when heading for our back field, I too would be tempted. The squatting approach is getting a little hard on my 60 yr old knees!
 
Carla Burke
gardener
Posts: 950
282
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jay Angler wrote:@Carla - have you actually used one of them? If I didn't tend to already have full pockets when heading for our back field, I too would be tempted. The squatting approach is getting a little hard on my 60 yr old knees!



I have a similar one, called the 'P-style', that I actually like better(even though I've not tried this one), simply because it's all 1 piece, so no chance of leakage, through joints, etc. It takes a little practice, but yes! It's absolutely doable. If you get it, I highly recommend trying it in the tub, or out on private land, where you can start off naked, until you get a feel for how it works best, for you. Then start practicing with various clothes on, lol. Any style you wear, you will be wise to practice a bit with it. Managing it with a long flowy skirt, fitted jeans, or a snug mini skirt  - all need to be managed differently. My usual is snug jeans with a utility belt, because I rarely carry a purse (too many shoulder injuries), plus I 'carry', so the extra weight on one side alters it. But, that's not my only style of clothing, so I've practiced with my other clothes, too.
 
Drew Moffatt
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: New Zealand
21
hugelkultur purity forest garden books cooking woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's for tattooing pigs ears yes.
It's been a long time since there were pigs here though.
I'll see what other interesting things I can find in the back sheds of this old farm.
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apple for Jay Angler for the pig tattooing thing :)
 
master steward
Posts: 2797
Location: USDA Zone 8a
756
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So, What is it?  dear hubby found a small zip lock bag with something inside that he can't remember why he bought it.

Inside is a coil of wire like for a rabbit snare:

Just to show what kind of wire:



Source


Two of something like these clamps:



Source


And a spring like the first one in this picture that is about 3" long:



Source

So what do you think this might be?
 
Pearl Sutton
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 4097
Location: SW Missouri
1580
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If that baggie was on the floorboard of my truck, I'd probably be replacing the throttle cable on the riding mower.
 
We're all out of roofs. But we still have tiny ads:
Perennial Vegetables: How to Use Them to Save Time and Energy
https://permies.com/t/96921/Planting-Perennial-Vegetables-Homestead
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!