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rasberries and their leaves

 
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Loved the videos I am going to you tube to your videos. The flashcards are a perfect tool for memorizing the traits. I eat some edibles out in nature and one of my favorites is raspberry leaves. Of course we all know about the fruit, but the leaves make great tea. Fresh or dried raspberry leaves are used to infuse boiling water, creating a tea with slightly bitter, tangy fruit flavor. I am addicted to this flavor and I started drinking this when I became pregnant to help strengthen my uterus. I allow the leaves to steep for five minutes or more depending on your preferred tea strength and sweeten the beverage with stevia, or honey if desired. Raspberry leaf tea is used to make cold and hot beverages. The leaves of the raspberry bush are high in minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and phosphorus, and packed with essential nutrients such vitamin C, E, A and B complex vitamins. Some have even made raspberry leaf popsicles; The infused liquid is frozen and then this is your popsicles, you may add the fruit to this also. One more thing to note is that the fresh leaves are wonderful and the dried leaves are wonderful but if you get that in-between fresh and dry (lets just call it wilted) there is a chemical compound that is present while it is drying that is hard on the stomach.
raspberry-leaves.jpg
[Thumbnail for raspberry-leaves.jpg]
picture of raspberry leaves
 
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Naomi Bien wrote:Loved the videos I am going to you tube to your videos. The flashcards are a perfect tool for memorizing the traits. I eat some edibles out in nature and one of my favorites is raspberry leaves. Of course we all know about the fruit, but the leaves make great tea. Fresh or dried raspberry leaves are used to infuse boiling water, creating a tea with slightly bitter, tangy fruit flavor. I am addicted to this flavor and I started drinking this when I became pregnant to help strengthen my uterus. I allow the leaves to steep for five minutes or more depending on your preferred tea strength and sweeten the beverage with stevia, or honey if desired. Raspberry leaf tea is used to make cold and hot beverages. The leaves of the raspberry bush are high in minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium and phosphorus, and packed with essential nutrients such vitamin C, E, A and B complex vitamins. Some have even made raspberry leaf popsicles; The infused liquid is frozen and then this is your popsicles, you may add the fruit to this also. One more thing to note is that the fresh leaves are wonderful and the dried leaves are wonderful but if you get that in-between fresh and dry (lets just call it wilted) there is a chemical compound that is present while it is drying that is hard on the stomach.



Naomi, thank you for sharing!
 
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