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ten skiddable structures

 
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Here are my skiddable structures in order of creation (I think):



First, the skiddable/draggable electric fence wires and battery box




the skiddable pig shelter




the skiddable goat shelter




the farrowing hut duplex




skiddable bee hut





Those were all on mount spokane. Designed and built by me. 2001 to 2005. The following are all on wheaton labs, I was involved in the design, but I didn't build any of these.



"willow feeder" (aka wheelie bin pooper) - this one is called "the chateau de poo"





out second willow feeder - this one is called "willow bank"





skiddable shower






skiddable cabin / porta-cabin / the love shack





skiddable woodshed





The ultimate skiddable bee hut




The willow candy warehouse

 
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OK, I'll bite.

What's a poop sled?
 
paul wheaton
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Julia Winter wrote:OK, I'll bite.

What's a poop sled?




A place to store "material" for two years when it will then be safe, one spring, to put at the base of a "poop beast".

The design of this sled is to keep the containers dry and out of the sun. And to keep them out of view.

It is possible that there could be some industrious people that will attempt experiments with some of the containers. Maybe some will try red wigglers or earthworms, some BSFL, some different sorts of composting agents, some EM .... each of these would be an attempt to remove the C and N and put that back into the atmosphere. I think there are pros and cons to this path. I prefer the idea that we keep the C and N in a form that can safely build our soils.

 
Julia Winter
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OK, that makes sense. Do you get BSF there, or would you have to keep them safe through the winter?

I like the slighly curved roof - very wabi-sabi.
 
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Mining claims aren't allowed to have permanent structures on them.  40 Years ago it was common for placer miners to build one or two room cabins (often with sleep lofts)on skids on their claims where they and their families lived during the summer while working the claim.  (Some lived there all the time).  

The cabins were theoritically portable (and often actually were, since the miners usually had some kind of big bull dozer that could drag the cabin away, (especially after things froze up in the winter).  

An alternate portable structure I used to see in Southeast Alaska was cabins built on rafts owned by logging families that would anchor in the inlet where they were logging for months or years at a time.  

I've heard that the Feds have cracked down on these kinds of practices.  Lamentable but understandable.  Nothing upsets a bureaucrat more than independant people living their lives in ways that don't agree with his vision!  


 
paul wheaton
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Another willow feeder, willowonka:



https://permies.com/t/65018/permaculture-projects/willow-feeder-willowonka-roundwood-timber
 
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I do not specifically make structures that are on skids, as much as I jack structures up, put skids under them and move them.

Few people realize how light a building really is. A few jacks can jack up an entire building with ease, and once on skids they are actually easier to slide then first thought. I routinely move buildings with a subcompact tractor!

In total I have moved (5) buildings and have 2 more planned for this fall. Moving buildings saves so much money because even if they require work, the framing, roof and whatnot is in place and that can save significantly. A key indicator on whether a building is worth saving or not, is to look at the roofline. A building with a straight roofline can be economically saved through renovation, but a building with a sagging roof line may require more work then starting with a new building.

Now that being said, there is nothing wrong with building things on skidding structures. I love the wheel and axle as much as the next person, however being able to take massive loads is another thing altogether. Skids built out of logs is really easy. Back in the old days they were called Drays and have moved tons of wood.

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Paul wrote: It is possible that there could be some industrious people that will attempt experiments with some of the containers. Maybe some will try red wigglers or earthworms, some BSFL, some different sorts of composting agents, some EM .... each of these would be an attempt to remove the C and N and put that back into the atmosphere. I think there are pros and cons to this path. I prefer the idea that we keep the C and N in a form that can safely build our soils.



Not understanding BSF I googled it and got 71 results. I'm going to guess Bulk Storage Facility. Still have no clue on EM or the reference to a willow feeder. I think I know that C is carbon and N is nitrogen. Please correct me if I'm wrong and for crisesakes educate me on these other terms.
 
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BSF= black soldier flies
EM= effective microbes
Willow Wonka is a fun name for a restroom where the excrements are deposited into a container, then stored air-tight for 2 years when the container is full, then used to fertilize willows.
 
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