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extracting resin from Ferula asafoetida / hing roots

 
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Hi, I have grown asafoetida in my polytunnel for about 5 years now so the roots are large enough to be harvested but I have no idea how to extract the resin. Please has anyone done this before?

I love to cook with hing and am keen to know what it tastes like for real rather than out of a little yellow pot! I guess it is strong as this product is diluted with flours.

thanks

Cesca
 
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A five year old question I'd love to know the answer to too!
Anyone?
 
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From Wikipedia: "The resin-like gum comes from the dried sap extracted from the stem and roots and is used as a spice. The resin is greyish-white when fresh, but dries to a dark amber colour. The asafoetida resin is difficult to grate and is traditionally crushed between stones or with a hammer. Today, the most commonly available form is compounded asafoetida, a fine powder containing 30% asafoetida resin, along with rice flour or maida (white wheat flour) and gum arabic.

Ferula assa-foetida is a monoecious, herbaceous, perennial plant of the family Apiaceae. It grows to 2 m (6.6 ft) high, with a circular mass of 30–40 cm (12–16 in) leaves. Stem leaves have wide sheathing petioles. Flowering stems are 2.5–3 m (8.2–9.8 ft) high and 10 cm (3.9 in) thick and hollow, with a number of schizogenous ducts in the cortex containing the resinous gum. Flowers are pale greenish yellow produced in large compound umbels. Fruits are oval, flat, thin, reddish brown and have a milky juice. Roots are thick, massive, and pulpy. They yield a resin similar to that of the stems. All parts of the plant have the distinctive fetid smell.[10]"   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asafoetida

So it's a perennial herb in the celery family Ferula assa-foetida. It's not closely enough related to Lovage (Levisticum officinale) for me to want to try faking this!
 
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this is short but explains where the rhizome is cut and the resin originates... so very interesting!
http://www.biologydiscussion.com/economic-botany/spices-obtained-from-roots-economic-botany/51944
 
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