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Extreme cold climate pigs?

 
gardener
Posts: 3286
Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft elevation
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I was wondering, is there pigs who have been bred in siberia or some place extremely cold, who can cope with the cold? I'm looking at some animals who could be left alone all year along, kind of. Just a shelter and a range, and fed garbage and leftovers.

Thanks.

Max.
 
steward
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Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
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Sugar Mountain Farm, in Vermont, is breeding cold hardy pigs who farrow with minimal shelter year round. Vermont is not as cold as Siberia, but it's pretty darn cold!
 
Satamax Antone
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft elevation
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Thanks Julia.

Well, i think my best bet, if i ever get to do it, is thoses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Siberian_pig
 
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Walter Jeffries of Sugar Mountainn Farm is also a member here at Permies!

For a general question like, "Can it be done" or, "Has it been done," what he's got published at his website is pretty thorough. He's been writing about it for years, and is very generous about sharing his knowledge and experience.

But even better, if you have a specific question, you can probably even get an answer from the man himself, if you're patient.
 
Julia Winter
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Yeah, you can comment on any of his posts at his website (and there are thousands by now) and he will most likely respond. He monitors all comments before they show up, so he will see what you write. If you have a question, best bet is to search around for an appropriate post and then ask your question there.
 
pollinator
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Location: RRV of da Nort
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@Satamax: Is this for your own region in the Alps? Why not just use European wild boar? However, if you are looking for something with more fat: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangalitsa

 
Satamax Antone
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Hi John. Thanks a lot for the reply. Wild boars are too hard to raise. I mean, far too wild. I had seen the Mangalitsa ones when i started the search. I think i will eventualy one day raise pigs. For ham and sausage. Not tomorow tho.
 
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I have pursued a large black as the dominant breed in my outdoor pigs. My pig are hairy and tough and have survived 2013/14 winter with subzero weather (not including windchill) in plywood shelter. They will still grow thru the winter, albeit slower. If your near michigan, come pick some up.
 
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