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Parasols!

 
Mother Tree
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I went out for a little walk earlier. Notice anything interesting?



Here's a close-up, in case you missed it...



It turned out there were a whole load more of them, too!



And a message from Gobbledy. "Happy Thanksgiving. Try frying them up - they taste just like chicken, and much better than turkey!"



We fried a load of them up with bok choy and bacon. Maybe fritters tomorrow.
 
gardener
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Nice! Take a little anti-cancer medicine and gut biome diversity to your tasty, wild organic meal. That turkey looks pretty tasty too.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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Burra, is to late to be share your enthusiasm?

Nice find!

I often find Parasols (I call them shaggy parasols) all through october, noverber, and even december. Sometimes they even come back after the nasty cold snaps we seem to be devolving mid fall in my region. Anyway, I often find them near semi-disturbed often compacted edges and borders with some pretty gnarly conifers. I'm talking growing under the drip line of ceders, redwoods, pacific yews... It looks likes those are in a mixed border with some sort of long needled pine? They seem to settle in for a while too. I usually find them year after year or pretty close too it.

Awesome!

John, I hadn't heard anything about parasols and cancer. Could you elaborate on that or point me in a direction where I could do some reading on it?
 
John Suavecito
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Mushrooms in general are one of the very top rated medicines for cancer. Check www.drfuhrman.com, www.nutritionfacts. org, or www.mercola.com.
The Chinese and many Asian cultures have known about this for thousands of years and have incorporated mushrooms into their cuisines, which is why you can find mushrooms more cheaply at Asian grocery stores. Specific mushrooms are better at other things too, like cholesterol, alzheimer's, or diabetes.
John S
PDX OR
 
Something must be done about this. Let's start by reading this tiny ad:
Learn Permaculture through a little hard work
https://wheaton-labs.com/bootcamp
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