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Mushroom ID

 
Posts: 274
Location: Central Maine - Zone 4b/5a
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Can you help me I D this mushroom? I found it growing on the side of a birch tree. Let's see if I can get these pictures to post, I am on my iPhone...
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Jessica Gorton
Posts: 274
Location: Central Maine - Zone 4b/5a
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Ha! It worked! I am inordinately proud of this moment.

I'm looking to see if it is edible. it looks like a mushroom I've seen wild crafted before.
 
Posts: 127
Location: Orgyen, zone 8
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If the spores are whitish/pale yellowish, the caps have small dark hairs and the stems are stringy and tough, you might have a member of the Honey Mushroom group, AKA Armillaria mellea. Here is a link to mushroom expert Michael Kuo's excellent website:

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/armillaria_mellea.html

Hope this helps!

 
Posts: 103
Location: Zone 5, Maine Coast
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Yep, I would say armillaria mellea. I've found them to be very good. My mom even dries them on good years, and reconstitutes them later.
Deer love them. I have a theory that the "October lull" described by whitetail hunters is actually when the armillaria fruits and the deer never leave the woods.
Young buttons are much better than old tough ones, get them before the veil breaks.
And look into possible gastric upset, it's never been a problem for myself and the dozen or so other people who I've eaten them with, but ymmv.
 
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