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Good fall foraging

 
pollinator
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While I was busy with new puppy drama, my husband had good results foraging yesterday:
Over 7 lbs of Chicken of the Woods (and he left half on the log)

I cooked it like southern fried chicken!

Next up Bear's Tooth:

I actually liked these a little better, sauteed with butter and garlic

Last up, Reishi:

A little to old to sell. Harvest season is June to September. I've put it on my calendar for next year. Sounds like it's very good for you but nasty to drink! Has anyone drank and Reishei tea? What did you do to make it palatable?
 
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Great pictures CJ. YOu give us some great ideas and images of what to look for. I've only found and eaten bear's tooth of the three, so I leave the advice to others.
John S
PDX OR
 
Cj Sloane
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John, how do you cook Bear's Tooth?
 
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Excellent pictures, CJ.................Is chicken of the woods related to hen of the woods or a sulpher shelf? my books don't list 'chicken of the woods' so I wondered if it has another common name? I don't think we have them here but I'd like to check. thanks.

I added this to the 'cooking' forum so maybe can round up some recipes.
 
Cj Sloane
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Sulpher shelf. One of the "safe six."
 
Judith Browning
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Cj Verde wrote:Sulpher shelf. One of the "safe six."



we do have them here, then, and I haven't seen one in years..........too dry, I guess and I haven't been in the right place at the right time.







 
John Suavecito
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I was backpacking so I cooked it on a griddle on a fire, but at home, I'd probably steam it.
John S
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Cj Verde wrote:

Last up, Reishi:

A little to old to sell. Harvest season is June to September. I've put it on my calendar for next year. Sounds like it's very good for you but nasty to drink! Has anyone drank and Reishei tea? What did you do to make it palatable?



I've been drinking tea from various species of Ganoderma every morning for over 20 years. I really like the flavor of the tea, but it is definitely an acquired taste. I mostly use the Artist's Conk/Ancient Ling Chih (Ganoderma applanatum) and the Oregon Reishi (G. oregonense), as regular Reishi (G. lucidum) is not found in the wild in Oregon. Basically, I harvest the mushrooms during a hot, dry period, dry them in the sun, and then cut off small chunks for tea. I boil a small piece for 10-30 minutes, then add a tea bag or two and let it steep for a while. I recommend adding honey to your first batch of Reishi tea, because it really helps get rid of the bitter taste. You might even grow to like the flavor of Reishi tea with honey. Bigger chunks of Reishi can be re-used several times. We also make a tincture by just adding fresh Ganoderma to large mason jars and then adding vodka or grain alcohol.
Reishi tea acts as an allergy medication, is an immune system booster, helps balance blood sugar, helps with weight loss and also leads to a feeling of well-being. I almost never get colds or the flu. It's one of my favorite group of mushrooms. The Ancient Taoist sages of China praised Reishi/Ling Chih as the key to an extremely long life free of illness.
 
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