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Ludi's Projects 2019

 
master pollinator
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I'm thrilled with how well the corn is doing in the Low Water Garden!  Joseph Lofthouse's Harmony Grain Maize seems especially productive.  I picked three ears this evening; my husband and I will eat one with dinner and I will take the other two to share with my dad in town this weekend.

* edited to add, the corn was very tasty as simple boiled corn-on-the-cob.  Good old-fashioned corn flavor as we remembered from the past.
P1070878.JPG
corn
corn
 
Tyler Ludens
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Here's a West Indian Gherkin, which I need to figure out how to prepare for eating.  Anyone have any suggestions?

P1070879.JPG
West Indian Gherkin
West Indian Gherkin
 
Tyler Ludens
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I decided instead of putting individual brush donuts around each Bur Oak, I'm making a fluffy brush fence around the entire oak area.  This will make the oaks easier to maintain and easier to plant support plants between them.
P1070884.JPG
fluffy brush fence
fluffy brush fence
 
Tyler Ludens
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Sunflowers and Indian Blanket in the Cemetery:

P1070888.JPG
Sunflowers and Indian Blanket i
Sunflowers and Indian Blanket i
 
Tyler Ludens
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A young Giant Lichen Orb Weaver Spider snacking on a Katydid:
P1070892.JPG
Spider snacking on a Katydid
Spider snacking on a Katydid
 
Tyler Ludens
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Duck Potatoes are going mad around the Frog Pond!
20190619_092134.jpg
Duck Potatoes around the Frog Pond
Duck Potatoes around the Frog Pond
 
pollinator
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It all looks fantastic!  I'm jealous.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Thank you!
 
Tyler Ludens
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The Notre Dame Oaks are coming up!
P1070895.JPG
baby bur oak
baby bur oak
 
Posts: 44
Location: Texas Zone 9
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Wildflowers in the double fence perimeter.



What Texan doesn't love bluebonnet?  Beautiful!
 
Rosie Carducci
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Very productive week so far.  I planted a Persian Mulberry (purchased), two Figs (grown from cuttings), three Moringa (grown from seed)


What's your secret for starting Moringa seeds?  I have some seeds, but so far haven't had any success in sprouting them.
 
Tyler Ludens
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I poured boiling water over them and soaked them overnight.  But I would say I only have minimum success with germination.  I planted a lot (at least a dozen, maybe 2 dozen) of Moringa seeds, but only got 5 survivors, which are doing very well after a slow start.  They don't like it until it gets nice and hot.  Planting early was a failure.  Even if they came up, they weakened and died in the cool Spring.



 
Rosie Carducci
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Tyler Ludens wrote:I poured boiling water over them and soaked them overnight.  But I would say I only have minimum success with germination.  I planted a lot (at least a dozen, maybe 2 dozen) of Moringa seeds, but only got 5 survivors, which are doing very well after a slow start.  They don't like it until it gets nice and hot.  Planting early was a failure.  Even if they came up, they weakened and died in the cool Spring.


Good to know, thanks!  It's already hot here, so maybe I'll have success this time.
 
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Smart move on the brush fence. When i was wrapping trees with remesh, then looked back at all the rings i made, a big fence would have used less materials.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Probably this Fall we'll put a wire fence around the space.  Since this is a major planting project, it will make sense to give it permanent protection.
 
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When's dinner?

Fabulous work and awesome thread. Inspirational!
 
Tyler Ludens
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Thanks!
 
Tyler Ludens
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Harvested the corn.  Some was sprouting in the ear.  The Lofthouse Harmony Grain Maize was the most productive and successful.  The Mountain Pima Cristalina suffered badly from serious gross fungus infestation.

The beautiful stained-glass looking ears are from the Lofthouse seed.

P1070906.JPG
corn harvest
corn harvest
P1070910.JPG
pretty corn
pretty corn
 
Tyler Ludens
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The Dwarf Cavendish Banana is doing the best, with Raja Puri coming in second.

Grande Nain and Brazilian are looking fairly pathetic.  I guess they don't like it here.

dwarfcavendish.JPG
Dwarf Cavendish Banana
Dwarf Cavendish Banana
 
Tyler Ludens
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Direct-seeded Landrace Tomatoes from Gilbert Fritz are being quite productive but most fruit has been destroyed by sucking insects.  I've started spraying with soapy water, which seems to be helping.
P1070913.JPG
Landrace Tomatoes
Landrace Tomatoes
 
Tyler Ludens
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Lots of Tatume squash maturing.

P1070914.JPG
Tatume squash
Tatume squash
 
Tyler Ludens
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Various Sweet Potatoes are making nice patches.
P1070916.JPG
sweet potatoes
sweet potatoes
 
Beth Johnson
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Direct-seeded Landrace Tomatoes from Gilbert Fritz are being quite productive but most fruit has been destroyed by sucking insects.  I've started spraying with soapy water, which seems to be helping.



You need two ducks! :)
 
Tyler Ludens
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I like to believe ducks are in my future!

 
Beth Johnson
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Corn and tomatoes do well where I am. We're not near the Salish Sea or the Olympics, so we have warmer and sunnier days than Seattle in the summer, but a two to five degree difference may be negligible.

All I know is that I would KILL to be able to grow some oranges. Oh, Oranges. How I miss you, Oranges and your fragrant blooms.

Bananas? I wish.

I might plant some clumping bamboo as a windbreak and for privacy. I live in a small city of about 16,000 people. I have a decent sized lot for being within city limits, but I hate people being able to see (read: stare) in my back yard. We get windstorms, and a mature apple tree was blown down last winter (it also had shot hole borers so there's that).

I'll probably plant a pear tree eventually. Right now I'm trying to recover financially from all sorts of expensive and weird things that happened in the past 12 months.

This my lot. I'll upload a topo map if anyone wants to do the hard work for me ;) Also missing are the bazillion trees (mostly big leaf maple, doug fir, a not CA redwood, some cedars/not cedars on the riverfront and the northeast side of the lot. Four ginormous horse chestnut trees keep the house cool. The bottom and back part of the lot are bare of trees. I'm letting the dandelions aerate the compacted soil, much to the chagrin of my neighbors. I chop and drop and hope the taproots help. The previous owner had a kickass garden, but the patch was a good six inches lower than the surrounding ground from super tilling. Only FSM knows how much fertilizer, etc. ran off into the river or seeped into the water table.

Sorry for the thread jack, but maybe not so sorry at all... ;)


Parcel-Screen-Shot.jpg
[Thumbnail for Parcel-Screen-Shot.jpg]
 
Beth Johnson
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Tyler Ludens wrote:I like to believe ducks are in my future!



Ducks are the future. Yes, yes they are.
fullsizeoutput_f1c.jpeg
ducks
ducks
 
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Tyler Ludens wrote:The Lofthouse Harmony Grain Maize was the most productive and successful.  



Harmony is my most genetically diverse variety of corn. It's ancestors come all over North and South America. I'm glad there were some genetics in it that survived your area!
 
Tyler Ludens
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Harvested most of the mature Tatume Squash.  We ate loads of immature ones as summer squash and gave many away as well.  This was one of the most productive squash years.  I'm extremely happy with this variety and probably won't bother with any other kind of summer squash.  
tatumeJuly2019.JPG
mature Tatume squash
mature Tatume squash
 
Beth Johnson
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Yay! I love this thread. :D
 
Tyler Ludens
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Harvested the squash from the Low Water Garden and got interesting results.  The Lofthouse Smallest Fruited Moschata Squash were the most productive, but none of the fruit matured; they are all small and wizened.  The Mayo Kama, on the other hand, only produced two fruits but they both appear to be fully mature and of a decent size.
lowwatersquashfruit.JPG
squash
squash
 
Tyler Ludens
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Somebody ate all the Bur Oak seedlings in spite of the brush fence, so I will put up a real fence and replant next year.  Germinating the acorns in damp sand in the fridge worked great.  Next time I will plant twice as many.
 
Tyler Ludens
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Shelled all my corn.  Lovely colors.  I plan to save some for future plantings, and use some to make Hominy (nixtamalized corn).

Also plan to give some away!  https://permies.com/t/40/54072/Regional-seed-swapping-Texans-Oklahomans

cornseeds2019.JPG
shelled corn
shelled corn
cornseedsdetail.JPG
corn seed
corn seed
 
Tyler Ludens
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It's maybe not the greatest time of year to plant seeds of things, but what the heck.  I planted seeds of PawPaw in the Food Forest, and Jack Beans in the Kitchen Garden.  

"Jack Bean
PJ001
Canavalia ensiformis.  Gorgeous plants!   The large leaves are thick and glossy, and the flowers are showy and very attractive.  Large white beans from huge plump foot-long pods borne on long vines.  

Jack beans originate in Central and South America but the archeological record shows they were part of southwestern diets as long ago as 700 AD.  Extremely rare today.  Young pods, leaves, and immature beans are edible when cooked; mature beans are mildly toxic so require rinsing and cooking in plenty of water. It is not advisable to eat large quantities.  From our Seed Bank Collection.

Origin: low desert
Requires a long growing season of 150 days or more, not suitable for northern climates or high elevations.
Deep rooted, very drought tolerant once established
Frost sensitive, but can be semi-perennial in very warm climates.
Vines are not twining, must be secured to a support in order to climb."

https://www.nativeseeds.org/products/pj001?_pos=1&_sid=66ca5ab07&_ss=r
 
Tyler Ludens
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This "dwarf" Moringa grown from seed this year is about seven feet tall
P1070981.JPG
dwarf moringa
dwarf moringa
 
Tyler Ludens
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Canna edulis from seed
P1070992.JPG
Canna edulis
Canna edulis
 
Tyler Ludens
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A decent harvest of direct-seeded Gilbert Fritz Landrace Tomatoes.
P1070997.JPG
Gilbert Fritz Landrace Tomatoes
Gilbert Fritz Landrace Tomatoes
 
Tyler Ludens
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Flowers on a first-year-from-seed Moringa.  These are the most successful kind of tree I have ever planted!
P1070999.JPG
1st year moringa
1st year moringa
 
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Thanks for posting, Tyler. Much enjoy reading the news...


Cheers,
Rufus
 
Tyler Ludens
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Bees at the birdbath, with Izzie photo-bombing

https://i.imgur.com/2BUw1YM.gifv
 
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Somebody ate all the Bur Oak seedlings in spite of the brush fence, so I will put up a real fence and replant next year.  Germinating the acorns in damp sand in the fridge worked great.  Next time I will plant twice as many.



if anything like my place it was probably rabbits.  They tend to eat anything in their way.  I like how things are progressing your way.  
 
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