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Dry Farmed Direct Seeded Tomatoes in 2019

 
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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forest garden trees
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Found a few potential keepers today. Recall most of tomatoes are F2s.

Pink could be a Grushovka or similar descendant.

Large red with speckles could be a Brad (Joseph's) descendant.

Tiger striped are probably inserted siblings of Exserted Tiger.

Orange could be from a couple of the crosses. Lots of orange coming from Big Hill x Unknown Joseph sent and also could be from Blue Ambrosia or Sungold descended.

Pale yellow is a little mysterious. Could be from Coyote pollen, a white tomato in the 17 garden, or could potentially be a Fairy Hollow. The green tomato with three lines on bottom is right next to it and might be the same plant. I ate one to check and it is not hollow. The two or so Fairy Hollow plants I grew as transplants have hard green fruit for now (hasn't ripened like in last year's picture yet).  Fairy Hollow is an early selection so probably still segregating.

Converting my sand pile base into a double dug bed. My helper (who mainly just questions my break taking) is in the garden overview photo. I guess he will be a supervisor some day. Only got it part way single dug today.
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Pink F2
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Large with golden speckles
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Tiger striped
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Orange
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Pale yellow hmm...
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Three stripes green still
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One picking of dry farmed direct seeded
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Helper about to do some digging
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Helper having about dug all he can today
 
William Schlegel
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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William Schlegel wrote:This spring when I grew out all my seed from last year's hab and penellii plants which wasn't much seed, there were three very fast growing seedlings. Two in the penellii, and one in the hab. The penellii seedlings have now been identified to my satisfaction . They are big hill plants and not penellii at all, I dropped two seeds in the wrong container at some point. The third seedling, I still have doubts about. Maybe this really is a cross? It's a really domestic looking seedling. I think it selfed. The rest of the seedlings from the one hab plant that produced in 2018 seem mainly self incompatible and look hab like. It looks a lot like a domestic tomato. The two fruits were partly ripe and continue to ripen off the vine but more slowly compared to all other tomatoes in my seed saving pile. The two fruits are badly cracked. It smells tomatoey harsh. If it is the child of last year's hab plant the fruit was red and tasted lycopene tomatoey extra harsh. So either another dropped seed of a full domestic or a very domestic hab cross.

Edit: I tasted the smaller one, larger was too moldy.from cracking and sitting a week. I think it's an ordinary domestic. It's a bicolor so maybe a Big Hill cross. Not very interesting though.



Well, it has grown out kinda hab ish leaves on its long vines. Maybe...

It is modestly exserted. I did save a little seed. Not much. Not super inspired by it.

Note, leaf in pic is the prominent green one. Ones underneath are from 3/4 hab.
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Habrochaites genes here?
 
William Schlegel
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Location: Montana
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Sunday September 8

Tomatoes still producing great. Probably better in the direct seeded dry farmed field. 8 grocery bags of tomatoes picked this weekend. Anybody live nearby who could use some?

Currently raining, possibly enough to make the soil moist for the rest of the fall. Could be a one inch or greater event.

Finished my little double dug experiment. Planted a little bit of each of lofthouse onions, Welsh onions, garlic (from Missoula seed exchange in 2016), parsnips (turga, kral, lancer), Fiore Blu Salsify, leeks, and sunchokes from Oikos.

Picked more wilds and half wilds. Got Arcanum berries and some peruvianum.

Tiny plant is doing great, still exserted and has promising berries though still green. Not so tiny anymore.
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Garden overview with new bed
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That tiny plant
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Half wilds and wilds
 
William Schlegel
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Location: Montana
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It's supposed to freeze so hard this coming weekend apples will freeze solid on the trees. So here is one last photo of the tomato garden alive and well.

Also that little bugger of a plant I gave some decent soil too. I picked a few of its green tomatoes to see if they ripen.

Also some pretty photos of pretty fruits.
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Garden before the frost
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Not so little anymore
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Big orange
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Yellow tiger
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Red tiger
 
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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William Schlegel wrote:One picking of dry farmed direct seeded



Well done William!

I saw ripe tomatoes in my garden from a direct seeded plant last time I was there. Forgot to pick them. I planted about 2000 seeds, and only 2 plants survived till now.

 
William Schlegel
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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Joseph Lofthouse wrote:

William Schlegel wrote:One picking of dry farmed direct seeded



Well done William!

I saw ripe tomatoes in my garden from a direct seeded plant last time I was there. Forgot to pick them. I planted about 2000 seeds, and only 2 plants survived till now.



If I remember correctly those were 2000 half wild seeds! So that one seed producing plant is interesting! I planted about 0.04 ounces of half wild seed into my mix. If I assume a 12,000 seed per ounce seed size that may have been 480 seeds. I got two plants. Neither produced a fruit. Though there may have been more that were either so domestic looking I couldn't tell them apart, or simply got outcompeted by the domestics. I currently have 7 times that much dry wild and part wild seed saved or over 3000 seeds for 2020's garden. Except I cheated and added some pure peruvianum complex seed as part of that which is already a champion volunteer. I plan to add more seed as I get time to seed save the rest of the wilds and half wilds I have picked. It could be a very wild garden next year. What if I grow 40 penellii transplants and 40 arcanum transplants.  Alternate them every 10 feet and direct seeded my aforementioned wild mix between them? Also allow volunteer domestics. Wonder what the field will look like if I do that next year?
 
William Schlegel
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Today was it September 28th.  Picked some more tomatoes today, no frost since early May. That's a pretty good run for Montana. My phone just said 39 F tomorrow- for the high. I expect frost tonight and if not tonight tomorrow night will be down in the twenties.
 
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Good timing!
 
William Schlegel
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September 30, first very hard frost. Got down into 20s 27 or 28 F. Squash in the yard were still alive yesterday. Today wilted. I doubt even the hardiest wild tomatoes will have survived this especially as its due to repeat even colder tonight. Interesting.
 
William Schlegel
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Tomato plants are mush.
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Mush tomatoes
 
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