Win a copy of 5 Acres & a Dream this week in the Homestead forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Mike Haasl
  • James Freyr
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Kate Downham
  • Jay Angler
  • thomas rubino

Redhawk's methods of making the biodynamic preparations

 
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Instead of getting into a realm that exceeds the subject of this thread, I've started a new thread over in the soil forum where I will go through the how to get the soil organisms where we want them in the quantities we need them.
This new thread is called "getting the biology we want into our soil".

Redhawk
 
pollinator
Posts: 157
25
dog trees books bee medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:hau Annie, the cow dun preparation can be done either buried or not buried. If you are going to use the mason jar in the same manner as you would with the "traditional" cow horn, you just dig your trench and  set it upside down as if the jar was a horn, then bury it for the required 6 months.
If you are going to use my "set it on a shelf" method, you need to make the rim (from the top edge of the jar (shoulder of the jar that is the start of the "mouth")) the soil fill area, that is, the manure is packed in to the shoulder then the remaining jar section is filled with rich soil and this is moistened before the lid is screwed on loosely. Then just set it on a  shelf (preferably out of the light, or as much as possible out of the light),  check it in 6 weeks but usually mine sits for 8 weeks before use. Hope that helps you out.

Redhawk



I am able to make a full picture of the process now. Thank you!
 
pollinator
Posts: 477
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
62
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Are there any links to places where we can get these herbs and dried plants? Outside of Oak bark the others would be hard to come by in any quantity or would be very costly.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Dennis, try these;

growers exchange

starwest

 
Posts: 5
Location: Wanaka, Otago, New Zealand
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just want to pipe in and say these threads are the best concise resources on the net I’ve found. Thankyou so much from New Zealand! We’re reading here too.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Annak, thank you, If you need something that I haven't covered, please let me know so I can build a thread addressing it/them.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 280
Location: Philippines
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dr Redhawk, Is it correct to say that we want a vigorous fungi under the soil. after all its the connection of plants to soil. then we want varieties of aerobic bacteria for the fungi to chew upon.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 477
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
62
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Julian,  IF you have time watch this compelling Ted Talk on how Fungi allow trees to talk to each other. Nature has much to teach us.  You are asking the good questions.

https://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_simard_how_trees_talk_to_each_other/transcript?language=en

 
julian Gerona
Posts: 280
Location: Philippines
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Dennis Bangham wrote:Julian,  IF you have time watch this compelling Ted Talk on how Fungi allow trees to talk to each other. Nature has much to teach us.  You are asking the good questions.

https://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_simard_how_trees_talk_to_each_other/transcript?language=en



Thanks I'm watching it now
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

julian Gerona wrote:Dr Redhawk, Is it correct to say that we want a vigorous fungi under the soil. after all its the connection of plants to soil. then we want varieties of aerobic bacteria for the fungi to chew upon.



I would say that is correct enough.
I am glad you watched Suzanne's talk on plant communication, it isn't limited to trees only though, and there is lots of cross communication going on through the fungal network as well.

Redhawk
 
julian Gerona
Posts: 280
Location: Philippines
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:

julian Gerona wrote:Dr Redhawk, Is it correct to say that we want a vigorous fungi under the soil. after all its the connection of plants to soil. then we want varieties of aerobic bacteria for the fungi to chew upon.



I would say that is correct enough.
I am glad you watched Suzanne's talk on plant communication, it isn't limited to trees only though, and there is lots of cross communication going on through the fungal network as well.

Redhawk



while watching the videos it occurred to me that " if plants communicate then isn't it correct to think that they also take care of their young"? This reinforce my belief/plan not to remove the old plants unless the youngs are more or less self supporting. At first I thought that the "old" mainly provide shade for the youngs while their roots has not yet reach deep enough where soil has more water. But after watching the video I realize that the "olds" actually feed/nurture their "youngs" just like how we humans do or any other bio specie.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, In fact I was discussing this exact nurturing facility with an elder several months ago when he said, "but you already knew that, by the time you were 8 years, you had been taught about the world is one whole being, not pieces and parts."

The thing about plants, animals, insects, microorganisms, air, water, fire, land, etc. is that it is all connected, We have always known this (we being aboriginal peoples), it is those of the "modern" era, European based cultures that forgot this most important part of the world.
When humans decided that they live on the earth and were not part of the earth, that is when all the troubles began and they continue because humans have the tendency to shut the part of themselves that is capable of feeling the earth's energy flow off completely.

If humans don't bother to feel their own connection, they don't worry about the destruction they do because they don't feel it is bad.

A tree that sends seed out far from the base of that tree can still, through the fungal network in the soil, find where those children sprouted and exudates are for far more than just calling for nutrients or crying about being sick.
Plants are people too, so we need to understand that they are far more like us, than most want to think they are, animals too, are far more like us than we want to admit to ourselves.
Once we understand that it isn't wrong to credit plants and other animals with having the same senses we have, that their actions are similar to our own, then we can live in the earth, as we are supposed to.

There are no actions that do not have consequences for every other part of the earth mother, we are part of the earth mother as are all others who dwell in her arms.
 
Posts: 2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi folks, saw this thread from a google search so joined to add my two pennies.

Regarding the cow horn "buisness". I have my own theory as to some of the reasoning put into it. I've not heard any biodynamic enthsiasts refer to it in this way. Firstly, I read a fair bit of Steiner and couldn't agree with or appreciate much of it. I do get along well with his ideas on farming and his 1920s warning about the bees and how they should be looked after.

Steiner saw the top 5 cms of soil as being very important and called it "nature's hymen". It could be argued that the horn represents what happens above ground, flowering, fruiting, growing etc whilst the manure represents what happens beneath it; roots, worms, microbes, and the two combined aids the growth between those two parameters. Considering that a teaspoon of this is used to treat an acre or so of land (that's an approx guess), it would seem likely that the action is not purely a physical one. One poster mentioned homeopathy and I'd agree that it's closer to that than merely supplementing the soil with microbes or silica. Over an acre, how's a teaspoon gonna do much there? I'd call it Alchemy. I do not know alot about alchemy and make no claims for it but I believe that is part of the methodology. The Tabula Smaragdina supposedly reads, in part:

'Mix  the  substances  of  the  Heavens  and  the  Earth  in  a  natural  way,  then  you  will  remain healthy and content all your life'.

The horn represents the "Heavens" and the manure represents the "Earth". The spiritualisation of matter and the materialisation of spirit. The Heavens could also be said to be the mental realm, the Earth is the physdical realm and the plants, humans and everything exist and grow between the two- the Earth's emotional/emote realm. So, this might be said to increase and improve the nature and qualities of "etheric" energies on the earth's surface, between the lower and the higher. If a human's body is taking food (earthly) and meditating (heavenly), say, in accordance with nature then he will be happy and healthy.

Obviously, I don't recommend doing this but there is another way to find out if it has any energetic affect and that's to eat a small bit. I did and it was very powerful. But putting manure in a horn and burying it is not the only thing that is done to it before it hits the ground, in less than trace amounts. It is also added to water (the emotion element to combine the heavenly mental with the physical earthly.) which is spiralled by hand for an hour and then sprayed onto the soil. Spiralled water is said to gather in "universal energy". Apparently, it makes for a black soil rich in carbon.  Likely it increases worm cast production to achieve this. If I made any conclusive statements then insert a maybe here and there. My two pennies
 
Posts: 12
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry Mr. Redhawk,

Im new to forms and permaculture.  I thought i saw you might have a book on soil?  Is it out yet, and I cant find it?
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6581
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1218
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Bryan, I am currently working on the book, it has taken a slow down because of health issues but I am still putting it together in first draft form.
It looks like it might end up being quite thick since I am already at 295 pages with no plates (illustrations and microphotographs), and I am not quite half way through with the material I want to cover in the book.

When it goes to the publisher I'll be putting up a notice here on permies for people who are interested in purchasing it. I'm hoping to get that done around the first of 2020.

Redhawk
 
Posts: 3
2
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you Dr. RedHawk!  We made your horse tail tea preparation and it stopped our Cedar Apple Rust problem dead in its tracks.  We needed to spray a couple of times with it, but it saved our apple trees this year.

We cannot thank you enough.  

We will be making your other preparations in the next year and will report back with any observations, feedback, or results.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 477
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
62
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:
When it goes to the publisher I'll be putting up a notice here on permies for people who are interested in purchasing it. I'm hoping to get that done around the first of 2020.

Redhawk


Dr. Redhawk. I hope you will include your biography. From what I have read here at Permies, you have had a very interesting and accomplished life.
 
Grow a forest with seedballs and this tiny ad:
2020 work trades for PDC, PTJ and/or SKIP
https://permies.com/t/work-trades-2020
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!