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Soft soled shoes and the argument for being barefoot

 
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Sorry, old thread, but...

Anyone still interested can look into zero-drop shoes. There are a few brands that sell them now. I recently invested in some Lems boulder boots. Haven't worn them much yet, but they are very flexible. Something like that can save your feet from the thorns, but give your toes ample space to spread, and foot plenty of flexibility.
 
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A favorite topic for sure.... I grew up barefoot at the house and loved it. I go barefoot as much as possible to keep my feet in shape and because it feels great. 50°F is about the cold limit before toes go numb quickly. But when I exercise (natural movement) barefoot in the cold, my posture and technique have to be just right (especially when jumping) or else it hurts the legs ankles and knees. Not sure why. I tried flat sole moccasins at work but some knee pain popped up. Not sure if from posture or shoes.
Great job for taking good care of your kid's feet!
 
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Lanie Veazey wrote:... I recently invested in some Lems boulder boots....



Thank you for posting about the Lems. I had never heard of them before and took a look at their website. Love their chukkas! And quite a bit less than the Softstar shoes, too. Something to save up for, for sure.
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:Figured I'd give everyone a heads-up. Soft Star shoes is having their clearance sale. So, if you're looking for some of their shoes for you or your kids, now might be a good time to buy!

http://www.softstarshoes.com/sale.html



Thanks for the link Nicole! I've mostly worn soft sole moccasins by Minnetonka & love them except for slippery soles when wet & the fact they wear through too fast. I love  best going barefoot when the weather allows. Very informative thread. Thanks all😀
 
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Annie Collins wrote:

Lanie Veazey wrote:... I recently invested in some Lems boulder boots....



Thank you for posting about the Lems. I had never heard of them before and took a look at their website. Love their chukkas! And quite a bit less than the Softstar shoes, too. Something to save up for, for sure.



My partner and I both got a pair of the Boulder boots over a year ago and have loved them! Can’t recommend them enough. We’ve used them both for work and everyday wear and found them very durable and comfortable. So much room for the toes! The zero drop, flexible sole really helps with balance and feeling connected to the ground too. They aren’t super warm in winter, but wool socks help. Ours are the regular leather and a simple coat of beeswax has kept them water proof, barring full immersion. The only downside is that now we can’t wear “normal” shoes, aka “foot prisons”.

Unshoes also has some pretty great options at a lower price than many of the barefoot shoe companies. We have some of their sandals and really liked them. Pondering trying either their moccasin style shoes or boots at some point.
 
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Love this topic. I go barefoot all the time! and i own some...unique sets of inexpensive barefoot shoes myself.
Since barefoot shoes are kind of trendy and have been trendy for years all these vibram soled shoes are way overpriced. Maybe theyre worth it, who knows.
I go with these amazing Minnetonka traditional soft soled moccasin. Its recommended to maybe half size down so that they fit like a sock to the foot, and also to wear them in the rain or get them wet on your BARE foot the first time you wear, so that they can form to the foot. They are super traditional and very comfortable. You can definitely feel the barefootedness in them :) :)
i also have a link to a shoe kind-of like the ones ive purchased before for cheap on amazon:
https://smile.amazon.com/Barerun-Womens-Barefoot-Outdoor-Exercise/dp/B07SSPH76L/ref=sr_1_46?dchild=1&keywords=water+shoes&qid=1575674381&sr=8-46

So these arent the exact shoe i got like a year ago, but it was some off brand $12.99 "water shoe" that feels exactly like these vibram soled expensive trendy barefoot shoes i was talking about above, on your foot. But cost way less. And i actually walk (on cement, and other surfaces) daily, a few miles with my doggo. Still somehow holding up. And they even arent showing a ton of wear. I can say its def worth the investment. Sorry i cant find the exact shoe, its not on my account anymore and i think the company i ordered from (some weird off brand) prob doesnt sell on amazon anymore. but there are tons of similar styles.

hope that helps with ideas.
Cheers!!! :D
049426_41_P1.jpeg
moccasin
moccasin
 
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Thank you to OP for starting this topic! I had a similar experience with shoes when my toddler started walking. His first pair were a cheap slip-on moccasin and were great for him when he needed something for outside. We usually removed them indoors because they are slippery on smooth floors. I can't even remember the amount of times we have been complimented about his shoes, and usually the complimentor followed it up with "I want them in my size" sort of thing.

Thank you to everyone posting the ones you love because now I have somewhere to start looking for bigger sizes for him and for the rest of the family too!
 
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Does anyone have a recommendation for bare foot like, soft soled shoes that would pass as 'dress shoes' in a professional environment? I know there are some famous wearers of vibrums out there, but they own those businesses so they can do as they like. I have to be 'presentable' in the eyes of my superiors. Three piece suits aren't expected but business casual is a minimum and I spend most of my life in dress shoes.
 
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There was another thread recently, about making your own bespoke shoes. It would seem the soft soled shoes might typically be the easiest ones to make, anyway. So, how many people are making their own versions? And with which materials? Creating your own gear, from renewable materials seems like the permiest way to go about it, for those who are able. 😁
 
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Cody Greene wrote:Does anyone have a recommendation for bare foot like, soft soled shoes that would pass as 'dress shoes' in a professional environment? I know there are some famous wearers of vibrums out there, but they own those businesses so they can do as they like. I have to be 'presentable' in the eyes of my superiors. Three piece suits aren't expected but business casual is a minimum and I spend most of my life in dress shoes.



I'd look into Soft Star shoes. They're a bit on the expensive side, but the cost is warrented based on the fact that it's a very eco-friendly buisness that pays it's employees well and the shoes are hand made from quality materials.

The Dash Runamocs are a more sneaker-looking shoe, but look relatively classy when in solid black or brown. They're  currently $140.00.

 


They also have the Hawthorn Chukka, which is a bit more formal looking. They're currently $190,



I don't have either of these shoes, but I love my Merry Janes for church/shopping/etc. I use the normal (more affordable and far less formal) roo moccassins for my gardening. They last a little over a year for me with lots of hard wear in rainy conditions and wet grass. I literally wear holes in the soles, I work them so hard!
 
Carla Burke
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Those roo mocs look very comfy. But, the Merry Janes look like they have have a pretty wide sticky-outy seam, all the way around the sole... I'd be afraid I'd trip over my own shoes, in them. (This is the voice of my personal experiences, lol)
 
Nicole Alderman
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I trip on a lot of things and in a lot of shoes, but I've never tripped because of these shoes. Even my kids didn't trip on the seem once their feet were past children's size 7 (something around 1.5-2 years old). The sole is thin and flexible and I don't even notice that the edge is there. I actually walk a lot more securely and twist my ankles much less in these shoes because the sole is so thin and I can feel the ground. In thicker soled shoes, I often start twising my ankle before i realize it, because the sole is turning before my foot has a chance to do anything about it. With thin soles, I can wiggle my foot and straighten my ankle out before it twists.

Also, because the soles are so flexible, the shoe and sole mold to your foot. The first few days I have the shoe, I do notice the edge. But, soon it molds with the curve of my toes and the edge bends up. I'll try to take a picture tomorrow to show what I'm talking about.
 
Carla Burke
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Nicole, that's excellent!! I tripped horribly, with my wide - seamed boots - but, they weren't meant for walking, they were meant for biking. Biker - boots are about protecting against breaks, sprains, deep cuts, & road rash. Hard soles are a necessity, with them - but, that could well be the reason they were so difficult, for me. On soft soles, the way you're describing them, even I might not break my neck, lol!
 
Bihai Il
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We finally outfitted our family with Softstars. They are definitely worth it! Better late than never, since I can't go back in time and replace my shoes. I tried on some of my old shoes that were in the garage, and feel like my poor feet are crammed and would be blistered in no time. I don't know how I used to wear them! I definitely walk differently and spread my toes more, but even beyond that I was surprised.

I got the wool Merry Janes and we all got Roos. I also highly recommend checking out Softstars.
https://www.softstarshoes.com/sale
 
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I'm so glad I've found this thread, all as it may be! I love walking barefoot inside the house...and would love to outside, but unfortunately, our yard is filled with spiders O_O Any gardening job I do I usually see three or four, and here in Australia even the little ones can do a fair bit of damage. I love my bogs charlie boots because they're soft on the top (feels a bit like gloves for my feet), but soft on the bottom as well would be even better.

Looks like a lot of the soft shoe sellers mentioned here are in the States, and a quick Google in Australia just shows baby shoes. Adding another project to the making list!
 
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I am searching for as-near-as-possible to barefoot shoes or boots for working in the garden. I am restoring property in PNW, still guerilla gardening as I battle invasive blackberries et al, and often working in wet conditions. Traditional garden boots are waterproof and sturdy but dont have good barefoot or natural foot design. I've researched barefoot and natural foot design but they dont seem to have a sturdy enough sole for digging, grubbing, hauling and the rest. I've checked out a few hiking boots with these designs but wonder how they would hold up in the winter rain and mud. Has anyone found footware with the perfect combination of sturdy, zero drop and supportive of natural foot action?
 
Bihai Il
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Marcia Meyers wrote:Has anyone found footware with the perfect combination of sturdy, zero drop and supportive of natural foot action?



I was looking at Vivobarefoot for those reasons. I haven't bought a pair though. I ended up with a cheap cheap pair I use in wet conditions for now. They're awful for digging.

Here's a link: https://www.vivobarefoot.com/us/womens/outdoor
 
Marcia Meyers
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Thanks for response. Good to know I am not alone in this quandary!  I've been landing on the same brand - looking at the Magna boot. Its pricey but could be worth it if it lasts. Let me know how they work out if you buy a pair.
 
Bihai Il
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Yes, you also! It's had to spend that much and be disappointed.
 
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Destiny Hagest wrote:elevating my feet for 15 minutes every four hours really pissed off my coworkers, but my body was in a much better state by the end of the day.



I have so much respect for you for doing this. Good for you for taking care of yourself even if other people try to guilt trip you into not doing it. Society is SO controlling and so hard to detach from.
 
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