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Am I Plum Nuts?

 
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"In the video they are obviously grinding apricot kernels"

OMG, thank you Rebecca, I am sheepish about my lack of attention to detail. I did not see the text underneath, and I appreciate your careful review of the video very much. Much obliged! One of these days perhaps I will try making prapu.

Most sincerely,
erica
 
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In the video it shows the "apricot" seed flour in the coating sauce - listen at about 3.55 he says "now we are adding a paste of the apricot flour"

This site says they use walnuts in the paste/sauce, although almond and walnut paste further down with buckwheat pancakes. (making me hungry...)
 
Nancy Reading
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I made some Victoria plum jam this year - (not my plums still) and put some of the plum seeds back in during the cooking. I wondered whether it was just my family thing, so I had a look through some of my recipe books and found references in two of my books:
Farmhouse Kitchen book 3 edited by Mary Watts has a recipe for "green egg plum jam" (I think these may be greengages?) in which the stones are skimmed off the surface as they boil "if liked a few plum kernels may be cracked out of the stones and added to the jam at this stage"
In The Complete Book of Preserving by Mary Cameron Smith again a recipe for greengage jam suggests adding ten kernels to 6lb of greengages which have been halved and stoned, before the simmering stage.
So they can be added either before cooking, or cooked in their shells in the jam and added at the end.
cracking-plum-stones-extracting-kernels.JPG
Cracking plum stones extracting kernels
Cracking plum stones extracting kernels
Finished-plum-jam-with-plum-stone-kernels.jpg
Finished plum jam with plum stone kernels
Finished plum jam with plum stone kernels
 
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Stanton de Riel wrote:re/ unpopularity of "stone" fruits as foods: They're tough to crack efficiently without mashing them! Most people try hammers, or vice grips(TM), or vices. The secret for seeds with hard shells is inertia, not kinetic energy. A heavy metal wedge (e.g. for log-splitting) (high ratio of inertia:kinetic energy) (several pounds) wielded by a gloved hand, against another heavy metal wedge (with nut detained if needed by the other gloved hand), provides ideal means for hand cracking even black walnuts (after the husk is removed, and the nuts-in-shells cleaned and dried). [Additional hint: provide means to spread the impulse generated safely out over a strong support surface.] A hammer (low ratio of inertia:kinetic energy) tends to send shell pieces flying at high speeds, unpredictably, and smash the nuts besides. Vice Grips (TM) and vices are slow and clumsy by comparison -- vicegrip must be adjusted precisely for each kernal, and can pinch your hand when the shell yields under stress, and vice requires winding in and out for each item. A useful device, tradenamed Robo-grip pliers (TM), offers low-mechanical-advantage jaw travel until the jaws bite on the nut, then automatically pivots into a high-mechanical-advantage device, sufficient to do manual secondary cracking on black walnuts, for example. Industrially, oscillating wedged jaw machines provide the same effect at greater throughput rate.



Perhaps easier, and less messy, mole grips. We've got decorative almonds planted near us, and their nuts are enough to break your average nutcrackers. But mole grips are made for the job. Helps though to attack the nut edge-on, and not at the widest part but a shade towards the pointed end - it seems weaker there. Adjust the mole grips for the size of nut, so your hand works more efficiently.
I need to wash the nuts before cracking - any that float in the water are generally bad, not worth cracking.

-----------------------

I find these almonds, along with apricot, European and Asian plums, cherry plum and prune nuts all taste pleasantly to strongly almondy, and I eat a few daily. I don't bother with peach stones - very thick shells, and in the UK they'll have been picked before the kernel is ready. Many other imported fruits in the UK have been picked before the seeds have fully developed (apricots generally OK). I know of people who eat whole apples - and their seeds produce cyanide. I have a 1950s historical cook book, that includes using the odd leaf of cherry laurel as a flavouring - the same stuff that you shouldn't pass through a garden shredder in a closed space, for risk of toxic fumes!
I was once given some prune stones that had been used to flavour brandy. They were particularly tasty. I think it was brandy.
 
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