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coconut milk frustrations

 
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http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00ALM5ZFM/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1443809390&sr=8-1&pi=SL75_QL70&keywords=SoyaJoy

Soyajoy G4 Soy Milk Maker and Soup Maker - with All Stainless Steel Inside

Found this on www.NaturalNews.com.

Makes coconut milk and I'm getting one soon.

Here is the coconut milk I'm using until I make my own....
2015-10-02-11.12.43.jpg
[Thumbnail for 2015-10-02-11.12.43.jpg]
 
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I'm hoping to create chestnut milk in the next several days. We have seven Chinese Chestnut trees and it's a struggle each year to do much with the crop. http://notquitefrenchcuisine.com/2014/11/22/raw-chestnut-milk/
 
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Have you considered using kefir grains? They reduce the lactose to almost nil, and add the good guys back in there. Homemade is way better than store-bought, because most of the time the store bought stuff doesn't even use a real SCOBY, but a formulated blend of bacteria and yeast.
 
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Some nut butters that are organic,  do not have any stabilizers. The oil ends up at the top of the container. This could be poured off, for other uses.

 If this product were put in the blender to make nut milk,  you would not have issues with chunks since they have already been finely milled.
 
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"Amazake is a naturally sweet cultured rice drink. During the culture process, enzymes break down complex rice starches to sugars making amazake sweet to the taste for drinking or use as a natural sweetener in other foods."

Something I am trying to make as I found a tasty sounding amazake pudding recipe so going to learn how to make it. Fun experimentation in the kitchen. Could be a beverage/milk concept that you could do without access to raw dairy, not sure yet.
 
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I buy organic shredded coconut in 50 lbs. bags from Tropical Traditions and make my own coconut milk. I then feed the coconut pulp to my ducks and the few chickens I have left.  Those old hens had pretty much stopped laying eggs.  Since they started getting the coconut pulp I am getting 3 eggs every day instead of 1-2 eggs every day.  I only have 5 - 3 year old chickens Two Toed Sally, Ramona, Alice, and Ruthie.  Penelope got sent to chicken heaven when a stuff breeze blew a pallet over on her.  It was a sad afternoon.  I have 30 egg laying ducks and since beginning feeding them coconut pulp I get more than 2 dozen eggs every day.  
It is easy to make and much more cost effective than purchasing a manufactured product.  I also will have nothing to do with soy.  It isn't for for human consumption.   I know some people use them for food but not me.  I don't eat any legumes, grains, or root vegetables.  
 
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Updates here. April I bought a Joyoung CTS2038 soypot. Played with soybeans (www.laurabeans.com) that are non GMO organic and no gluten (their rotation crop is non-GMO corn) and various cashew sources (settled on www.znaturals.com) for 50# bulk raw organic cashews (they come in plastic vacuupack, 2 25# bags, and can easily be transferred. Until I get enough glass/crockery, 25# just fits in a 5 gallon pail with gamma-lid). I tried soaking and not, and do 'dry bean' cycle with 2/3 cup soybeans and 1/4 cup rice (you can omit rice, it gives more body is all) or 3/4 cashews (and 1/4 cup rice) and it does the cook and grind work for you. Sieve if you want, you need at least 28 to the inch sieve or muslin for a thin milk. I don't strain and the soybeans I add other things and make into a sort of 'cream soup' which is eaten hot, or add potassium chloride, garlic powder, fresh ground black pepper, and nutritive yeast flakes, and mix up for a sort of soup as well. (I add other things as I feel like) That is also consumed hot. Very good. Dry run cashews are more flavorful, and refrigerating it for six hours is very thick and creamy. Use in 24 hours. Soaked cashews are a great start to vegan cheeses, elsewhere I posted my favorite quasi-cheesy melty dippy cheese stuff made on a cashew base.

I went to purchasing cold small batch pressed coconut oil (organic) by the gallon and want to start buying 5 gallon. Thank you Dave Bennett, I will look into that 50# bulk from Tropical Traditions. Coconuts and Cashews have some natural healthy fats that are good for you and I need more of that.

Comment about drinking 'hot' nutmilks, it's an acquired taste. I went no-sweetener, as I got the sweet tooth to die and I have great difficulty with honey (seriously allergic) and malt sugar (or anything malted) and most of the other sweeteners (aspartame, sorbitol, mannitol, xyoltol etc) really 'rip me up' (it's bad trust me, my innards revolt). Once you get used to savory not sweet in a 'milk' you will find some of the alternates quite delicious. As for almond, not a big fan, though I have some trees going. Really hope the coconut can work. All the showings of rich creamy has me drooling.... um, how is 'hot' coconut milk?

 
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When we lived in Colorado we did a couple of milk shares over the years and were so overjoyed to get raw, grassfed creamy Jersey and Brown Swiss milk weekly for a reasonable price ($6/gallon). Having access to raw, real milk used to be considered a basic human right in America and I can appreciate why. It is completely illegal in Iowa, so we spend $8/gal on locally-produced grassfed, non-homogenized, low-temp pasteurized milk. We're on a really tight budget so its mainly for my daughter though we also make about 1/2gal per week of kefir which we share (though a bit might be used when soaking the chicken feed, or as a component of the holistic spray I use on the orchard - best natural fungicide EVER). Ideally, in the next year we'll purchase a cow and do 100% grassfed, once-daily, seasonal (Apr-Dec) milking to provide our dairy needs. We've got the grass (6 acres of diverse pasture and 4ac of alfalfa) and should recover the costs fairly quickly considering the high price of quality butter/milk/cheese. We don't use much coconut milk (maybe a can/month in a curry, or the occasional coconut ice cream I make, most recently date-ginger...awesome). We do buy a 5gal bucket of coconut oil once a year as we commonly use it in coffee, sauteing and roasting vegetables. We're slowly trying to replace that with our homegrown lard (not brave enough to try it in my coffee though!).

We haven't purchased any vegetables since May, the root cellar will be complete in a week or two and we've got enough potatoes, squash and root veges for the winter and a fair amount of dry beans. We're making progress! Producing our own dairy in a year or two will really round our production out!
 
Deb Rebel
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There is nothing like a few squirts of raw milk straight out of the cow.... though as a kid it was more to gag out my big-urban dwelling cousins. Fresh raw milk is a true treasure. However I'm older and only have two acres in town and can't keep a cow these years...  We kept Holsteins, and had one Jersey, don't know how we ended up with her. She was so old by the time I left the farm, but she had her calf every spring, and we kept all her heifers.

Ah yes, the memories.

Tropical Traditions is a membership (currently a discount) and has some sales going on until the 13th. So if you're reading this soon, trip over there if you want the specials.
 
Dave Bennett
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Deb Rebel wrote:There is nothing like a few squirts of raw milk straight out of the cow.... though as a kid it was more to gag out my big-urban dwelling cousins. Fresh raw milk is a true treasure. However I'm older and only have two acres in town and can't keep a cow these years...  We kept Holsteins, and had one Jersey, don't know how we ended up with her. She was so old by the time I left the farm, but she had her calf every spring, and we kept all her heifers.

Ah yes, the memories.

Tropical Traditions is a membership (currently a discount) and has some sales going on until the 13th. So if you're reading this soon, trip over there if you want the specials.


Tropical Traditions always has a sale going on the products just change.  Membership is not required unless you choose to purchase larger quantities using their "healthy buyers club" program.  I purchase buckets of gold label coconut oil and 50lbs. bags of shredded coconuts when the deal is free shipping.  I enjoy a nice cold glass of coconut milk on a hot day and mixed with ground raw cacao it makes luscious hot "chocolate" that I sweeten with powdered stevia leaf.  I might add that my primary beverage daily is coffee but I also drink about a quart of raw heavy cream every day.  There are LOTS of Amish dairies in this area. NY State Dairy regs allow raw dairy sales at the farms. I eat LOTS of home churned raw cultured butter too.  If I had the space I would get a Jersey cow. I also have an affinity for Nigerian/Pygmy cross goats because most produce very high butter fat milk. I only need enough milk for me so a few tiny goats would work nicely.  
 
Deb Rebel
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Dave Bennett wrote:Tropical Traditions always has a sale going on the products just change.  Membership is not required unless you choose to purchase larger quantities using their "healthy buyers club" program.  I purchase buckets of gold label coconut oil and 50lbs. bags of shredded coconuts when the deal is free shipping.  I enjoy a nice cold glass of coconut milk on a hot day and mixed with ground raw cacao it makes luscious hot "chocolate" that I sweeten with powdered stevia leaf.  I might add that my primary beverage daily is coffee but I also drink about a quart of raw heavy cream every day.  There are LOTS of Amish dairies in this area. NY State Dairy regs allow raw dairy sales at the farms. I eat LOTS of home churned raw cultured butter too.  If I had the space I would get a Jersey cow. I also have an affinity for Nigerian/Pygmy cross goats because most produce very high butter fat milk. I only need enough milk for me so a few tiny goats would work nicely.  



I'm not aiming for the high fat from dairy/animal. I have genetic cholesterol issues so diet control includes eating vegan. Sigh. How long does it take you to go through 50# of shredded, and when is the most likely time of year they will offer free ship? And is shredded, flake, or chip the best for making coconut milk from?
 
Dave Bennett
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They seem to do free shipping quarterly.  I am not certain though.  I am on their mailing list and always scan the very regular emails for deals.  When the shipping is free I stock up.  50# lasts me about 5 weeks.  I am guesstimating because I never really paid attention.  It's the same way with coconut oil.  I buy gallons because they are easier to deal with than the 5 gallon pail. I use quite a bit because I drink
quite a lot of coffee.
I'm sorry to hear about your cholesterol problems.  I don't pay attention to cholesterol as my caloric intake of saturated fats and especially butter is 65-70% daily.  I won't discuss the nutritional aspects of a vegan diet here.  Last time I did I got in trouble
 
Deb Rebel
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Dave Bennett wrote:They seem to do free shipping quarterly.  I am not certain though.  I am on their mailing list and always scan the very regular emails for deals.  When the shipping is free I stock up.  50# lasts me about 5 weeks.  I am guesstimating because I never really paid attention.  It's the same way with coconut oil.  I buy gallons because they are easier to deal with than the 5 gallon pail. I use quite a bit because I drink
quite a lot of coffee.
I'm sorry to hear about your cholesterol problems.  I don't pay attention to cholesterol as my caloric intake of saturated fats and especially butter is 65-70% daily.  I won't discuss the nutritional aspects of a vegan diet here.  Last time I did I got in trouble



Okay I will at least sign up for newsletter then from Tropical Traditions. 10# a week is a lot. The cholesterol is now managed, I return good numbers and HDL is over 60 so life is better. Some people do not have the problems I was having, and the vegan diet helps control that aspect. My bloodwork also shows my diet is balanced and I have enough of everything I'm supposed to so that is the good part. I am a medical not moral vegan (doctor ordered diet change). I miss real cheese, and real butter, though I have found some alternatives that aren't bad. Coconut oil figures in that prominently.

So have you tried the different forms (shredded, flake, chip) and what is the better for making coconut milk?
 
Dave Bennett
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Deb,
I didn't delve into the cholesterol issues and vegan diets because it is much too controversial.  The whole nutritional debate only germinates cacophony.  The problem that most often get completely ignored is the fact that doctors very rarely have the nutritional foundation to make any pertinent recommendations regarding diet. Dietary fats including cholesterol rich saturated animal fats do not create high levels of serum cholesterol.  That is absolute myth and any medical doctor that stated that it does is full of manure.  Nutritionally humans cannot thrive on a vegan dietary regimen.  Of course there are exceptions but those are exceptionally miniscule.
I have a background in ethonobotany but also human physiology and nutrition.  My graduate educational explorations concentrated on nutritional anthropology.  Anyway hopefully Trop. Trad. will have free shipping featured soon.  
 
Deb Rebel
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Dave Bennett wrote:Deb,
I didn't delve into the cholesterol issues and vegan diets because it is much too controversial.  The whole nutritional debate only germinates cacophony.  The problem that most often get completely ignored is the fact that doctors very rarely have the nutritional foundation to make any pertinent recommendations regarding diet. Dietary fats including cholesterol rich saturated animal fats do not create high levels of serum cholesterol.  That is absolute myth and any medical doctor that stated that it does is full of manure.  Nutritionally humans cannot thrive on a vegan dietary regimen.  Of course there are exceptions but those are exceptionally miniscule.

I have a background in ethonobotany but also human physiology and nutrition.  My graduate educational explorations concentrated on nutritional anthropology.  Anyway hopefully Trop. Trad. will have free shipping featured soon.  



Yep, my dietary and nutritional issues are off a chart and that's about what has to be said. Going vegan did lower the cholesterol where nothing else was getting it below 500. I have a blood panel every six months to check things are in balance and I don't show a deficiency. I am hoping that coconut oil and adding coconut milk will add depth to my diet without messing with my various numbers. One thing about cutting dairy was getting rid of my near volcanic acid reflux. Though as I said I miss real cheese and butter.

Thanks for the heads up and additional information bout Tropical Traditions. If I add something to diet I have to make it economically affordable even if that means buying in massive bulk. I wonder if I can make coconut cream in my soypot?
 
Dave Bennett
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I cannot answer that one.  I'm not familiar with the device.  I guess it is a soymilk maker and since my opinion of soy is that it is not suitable for human consumption I would not have a reason.  I don't eat legumes.
 
Deb Rebel
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Dave Bennett wrote:I cannot answer that one.  I'm not familiar with the device.  I guess it is a soymilk maker and since my opinion of soy is that it is not suitable for human consumption I would not have a reason.  I don't eat legumes.



That is what it's called but you can make a lot of different milks in it. I make a lot of cashew milk in it. The one I purchased was the https://www.amazon.com/CTS-2038-Easy-Clean-Automatic-Stainless-Capacity/dp/B00BYMRCCM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1476404377&sr=8-2&keywords=joyoung+cts-2038 . It has been a workhorse, I have had it for 6 1/2 months. Buying the ingredients, making my own milks, at two pots a day including the cost of the pot, I paid for it in three weeks over buying stuff from store by the carton. I'm wondering if I can make coconut cream in it or at least a milk (and sieve or nutmilk bag filter it after). I consume lots of different legumes in search of protein. It would be nice to add coconut to the choices... if anyone else has an idea about using a soypot for coconut, please share?
 
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I make horchata from tiger-nuts or coconut milk from shredded coconut - it is cheaper than the canned stuff but not as fat... (if I need to make chocolate truffles I still use the canned stuff). I don't like the horchata that I can buy in the supermarket, not even the organic one.

I use coconut-oil for my coffee - basically bullet proof except I don't use butter (will try to re-introduce butter when we are all symptom free from all our allergic symptoms). Mine isn't though.

And yes - if your blender is good enough cashew cream is excellent (and makes a killer ice cream).
 
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Btw. We also use tahina (not emulsified) to make chokolate milk for the kids. Could use hazelnut milk instead except my son is allergic.
 
Dave Bennett
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Deb Rebel wrote:

Dave Bennett wrote:I cannot answer that one.  I'm not familiar with the device.  I guess it is a soymilk maker and since my opinion of soy is that it is not suitable for human consumption I would not have a reason.  I don't eat legumes.



That is what it's called but you can make a lot of different milks in it. I make a lot of cashew milk in it. The one I purchased was the https://www.amazon.com/CTS-2038-Easy-Clean-Automatic-Stainless-Capacity/dp/B00BYMRCCM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1476404377&sr=8-2&keywords=joyoung+cts-2038 . It has been a workhorse, I have had it for 6 1/2 months. Buying the ingredients, making my own milks, at two pots a day including the cost of the pot, I paid for it in three weeks over buying stuff from store by the carton. I'm wondering if I can make coconut cream in it or at least a milk (and sieve or nutmilk bag filter it after). I consume lots of different legumes in search of protein. It would be nice to add coconut to the choices... if anyone else has an idea about using a soypot for coconut, please share?

DEB! FREE SHIPPING AT TROPICAL TRADITIONS ...,,TODAY ONLY!!!
 
Deb Rebel
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Thank you Dave! On it!
 
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I just found this thread, and thought I'd chime in. We love coconut milk in our house, and it get used a lot, especially with my husband now being diagnosed with Crohns.



This is the variety we buy (https://www.amazon.com/Aroy-d-Coconut-Milk-100-Original/dp/B00JUB8N3G). Aroy-D coconut milk is in a non-bpa tetra pack, so it's a bit less toxic. Also, it has no additives: it's just coconut and water. Plus, it comes in convenient little 1 cup containers, which means we don't end up wasting much, if any. We don't buy ours through amazon, as the local asian markets sell it for $0.99/container (rather than $18 for 12 containers). But, if you don't have local asian markets, online is probably your best place to get it.
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:I just found this thread, and thought I'd chime in. We love coconut milk in our house, and it get used a lot, especially with my husband now being diagnosed with Crohns.


This is the variety we buy (https://www.amazon.com/Aroy-d-Coconut-Milk-100-Original/dp/B00JUB8N3G). Aroy-D coconut milk is in a non-bpa tetra pack, so it's a bit less toxic. Also, it has no additives: it's just coconut and water. Plus, it comes in convenient little 1 cup containers, which means we don't end up wasting much, if any. We don't buy ours through amazon, as the local asian markets sell it for $0.99/container (rather than $18 for 12 containers). But, if you don't have local asian markets, online is probably your best place to get it.


Tata International is the parent company that manufactures and markets Aroy-D coconut milk.  I would suggest researching this global marketing giant.  As "Permies" it is my understanding that we are working to heal the earth.  Tata International is involved in environmental destruction.  Perhaps this comment will be blocked perhaps not but TROPICAL TRADITIONS supports small family farming in the Phillippines.  If you purchase unsweetened shredded coconut and make your own milk there is no doubt about the ingredients.
 
Nicole Alderman
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Dave Bennett wrote:

Nicole Alderman wrote:I just found this thread, and thought I'd chime in. We love coconut milk in our house, and it get used a lot, especially with my husband now being diagnosed with Crohns.


This is the variety we buy (https://www.amazon.com/Aroy-d-Coconut-Milk-100-Original/dp/B00JUB8N3G). Aroy-D coconut milk is in a non-bpa tetra pack, so it's a bit less toxic. Also, it has no additives: it's just coconut and water. Plus, it comes in convenient little 1 cup containers, which means we don't end up wasting much, if any. We don't buy ours through amazon, as the local asian markets sell it for $0.99/container (rather than $18 for 12 containers). But, if you don't have local asian markets, online is probably your best place to get it.


Tata International is the parent company that manufactures and markets Aroy-D coconut milk.  I would suggest researching this global marketing giant.  As "Permies" it is my understanding that we are working to heal the earth.  Tata International is involved in environmental destruction.  Perhaps this comment will be blocked perhaps not but TROPICAL TRADITIONS supports small family farming in the Phillippines.  If you purchase unsweetened shredded coconut and make your own milk there is no doubt about the ingredients.



Thank you for the heads-up! I did not know that about Aroy-D's manufacturer, though I should have been suspect as the price is just "too-good-to-be-true." I would love to have the time to make our own coconut milk, but as it is having a three-year old and another baby due any day, and a husband with Crohn's, and a garden to tend, there just isn't time. We spend most of time together cooking and preparing food everyday, since everything has to be made from scratch due to my husband's diet (as well as wanting a healthy diet for my three-year old and unborn baby). I look forward to a time in which we can afford both the time and money to make our coconut milk from scratch. We do purchase our coconut oil from Tropical Traditions, and I love supporting them when I can!
 
Deb Rebel
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Again, Dave, thanks for the quick drop about the free ship. I ordered 50# of flake and a 5 gal of oil. I will see how long it lasts.

Our grocery store got in some whole coconuts, and I bought one, broke into it and used that to make a pot of milk. Interesting. I am probably going to blend with something else but it does add a lot to the variety I have in my diet. I'm still working on the nutrition-vs-calories. My hubby wants to eat healthier seeing my turnaround so I bought the mass quantity of product. It only hurts buying massive bulk when it comes time to replace it, overall it is cheaper. Looking forward to getting the stuff and trying it. I am getting gallons of oil at roughly $60 plus $10 ship and this oil looks to be much better.
 
Deb Rebel
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Nicole, may I suggest investing in a soypot. They are meant to make soymilk, but I make a lot more than that in mine (mostly cashew milk at present). It so takes the effort out of making your own, and it's fresh when you want it. The one I purchased is https://www.amazon.com/CTS-2038-Easy-Clean-Automatic-Stainless-Capacity/dp/B00BYMRCCM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1477034460&sr=8-3&keywords=Joyoung+CTS-2038 which had a sample of Laurabeans soybeans (enough for one pot). (soybean charge I use 2/3 cup soybeans soaked for 12 hours in fridge, and 1/4 generous cup of rice to add thickening and body) Laurabeans is organic, gluten free (their rotation crop is corn... unless you're allergic to corn) and total non-GMO. Most of their crop goes to Japan for making tofu and soymilk, and I can vouch it's a quality soy. IF you eat/drink soy. I have dropped to just a few batches a week, but still like my soymilk. I will also run soy batches to make my own tofu. Mostly I make cashew milk (3/4 cup unsoaked, generous 1/4 cup rice) in it and drink it hot (eat it like soup with a few additives). As I experiment with the coconut I will be glad to share the recipe when I dial in what works with that pot. You can also get the pot with a sample of tofu coagulant instead of the soybean sample ($139 vs $117). If you drink two pots of soy a day you will go through 10# a month, doing two with a pot for tofu a day, 15. I have scaled back and now run 12-15# of organic raw cashews a month for milk and making vegan cheeses. (those I buy at http://www.znaturalfoods.com, at $375/50# shipped to your door, and they are fat luscious nuts).

It sounds expensive but here all the various alternative milks (Silk Brand) with tax come to $8.52 a gallon, and buying bulk ingredients and using purchased drinking water, comes out to more like $2 a gallon, so in the first three weeks at two pots a day I paid for the pot. If you do soaked charges it takes a little planning, but to have chilled milk just make the batch the night before and put in fridge, it will be ready by morning.

I am purchasing another one just because I've put over a year's wear and tear on mine already and I want a back up, 'just in case'. It is very easy to clean the pot at the time you decant the batch. I make it part of the routine. It will chirp/beep at you for about a minute when done (batch takes 30-35 minutes to process and cook) and if you get it right then it cleans up easy peasy. About once a month I take some Barkeepers Friend cleaner to it and it looks like new again. (this is at 2 plus batches a day, I do about 18 a week).

I want to add one more thanks to Dave Bennett.
 
Dave Bennett
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Deb Rebel wrote:Again, Dave, thanks for the quick drop about the free ship. I ordered 50# of flake and a 5 gal of oil. I will see how long it lasts.

Our grocery store got in some whole coconuts, and I bought one, broke into it and used that to make a pot of milk. Interesting. I am probably going to blend with something else but it does add a lot to the variety I have in my diet. I'm still working on the nutrition-vs-calories. My hubby wants to eat healthier seeing my turnaround so I bought the mass quantity of product. It only hurts buying massive bulk when it comes time to replace it, overall it is cheaper. Looking forward to getting the stuff and trying it. I am getting gallons of oil at roughly $60 plus $10 ship and this oil looks to be much better.


Cool deal Deb.  I don't bother with calories but I also am very careful about consuming as few carbs as possible.  My diet is approximately 70% fats and especially animal fats, 25% proteins, and 5% or less carbs.  I do understand the problem with buying in bulk.  It certainly does put a pinch on my budget.  I just ordered a 50# bag of shredded coconut too.  Now I'm broke until my next SS check at the beginning of Nov.  I cannot wait until I finish building my new duck house so I can begin feeding them more protein and get them laying eggs.  I need the income.  I finally completed my pasture fencing so there is 3 times the forage area.
 
Deb Rebel
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@ Dan, it sounds like you are doing mostly a paleo diet. Good luck on getting your ducks to produce. I am on celiac, vegan, and other. I agree about bulk hurts in the short term. Other than that I am happy to embrace coconut. The oil is much higher smoke point than olive and looks like it will work with our family goals of general health. If there is another free shipping day at Tropical Traditions please give me a heads up as though I'm subscribed I might miss it. Thanks again to the pointer to Tropical Traditions.
 
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So Jocelyn, how goes the battle? As much as I appreciate the enthusiasm of the "Why don't you just get a cow?" crowd, I hope you can find some A2/A2 milk to try from different sources with forage optimised to your needs. I mean, if you guys eat nettles and oats, dandelions and random forage greens without adverse reactions, well it would be easier to tailor a cow's pasturage to your needs if it was yours, but I would hope it would be possible to find someone with an A2/A2 heritage breed that diligently avoids undesireable grazing.

I mean, what you really need is someone in the "Why don't you just get a cow?" crowd who has cow tending and dairy experience, all the way up to butter and cheese making, as well as a passion for making you cow's paddocks exactly everything you and Paul think they should be, and the financial and social freedom to up stakes and take up with you fine folk. Even if you find you can only eat the butter, I think it would be worth it, considering the manifold benefits of a tiny herd of heritage cattle, not just in terms of nutrient cycling in a paddock shift system, but the many uses for raw milk, including the feeding of soil. And pigs.

Which reminds me, you mentioned that you were both okay with butter. What about cheese? Is it broken down bacterially to a more digestible state, or is it a concentration of that which makes Paul sad?

Also, for everyone making nut milks from whole nuts, I had amazing success adding a tablespoon of diatomaceous earth to my blender. I am pretty sure it was abrasive in the mix, helping to break down particulates into homogeny, as when I did the same in my green smoothies, a blender that would leave teeny tiny bits of kale and spinach leaf instead produced something that looked like it came out of a Vitamix or similar properly powered blender. I drank them too fast to be able to say, and I never used the technique to make nut butters, but I have recently wondered if the addition of diatomaceous earth would affect separation of solids and oils. I would imagine the abrasive quality would let you get more out of dried raw organic coconut flakes, too, or whatever stuff you find you are later straining for particulates. I don't know if it would obviate the need entirely, but please, should anyone try it, let me know.

-CK

 
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Just bumping this thread as a post back up the line mentioned oat milk.  After trying a carton made by "Planet Oat" I was impressed.  Then trying to make it myself with different oats (rolled, steel-cut, bran) ran into the "slime conundrum":  Oat gum, the beta-glucan polymer that gives oatmeal that gummy texture.  Most of my tests so far have failed to get passed the gumminess of the final milk, but have been reading that the blending part should be short and as cool as possible.  Since I've been blending the oats just like doing almond milk, I think I'm way over-blending....and over-heating the mixture.  Anyone out there make consistently non-gummy batches of oat milk and would care to share the recipe?  Thanks!
 
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