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Best Non Electric Coffee Grinder

 
Posts: 244
Location: Málaga, Spain
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I bought a coffee grinder last year and did a little bit of research. Although the Porlex was the one with better reviews, I found it too expensive. Chinese-made grinders got very bad reviews. So I decided to go for the Hario Skerton (second edition) and I was lucky enough to find it on sale. I think it cost me 35€.
So far it's worked pretty well. You can select different sizes, and even the coarser ones are quite homogeneous --this matters to me, since I use different coffee makers that requires different coarseness. I don't expect it to last a century like the pics above, the lid is made of plastic and there's rubber all around, but if it makes up to ten years that would have been a good purchase. The family is enjoying the extra aroma on the coffee, but the work of grinding they leave it all to me.
 
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Location: Southern Germany
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Interesting to read about the different grinders.

Only last year could I convince my husband (I myself don't drink coffee) to use organic fairtrade coffee instead of the brand he always chose. They come as whole beans.

So now we have two possibilities: When he wakes up first, he uses the electric coffee grinder he brought from Argentina which does not really fit with our electric input (another reason I don't like to use it). When I wake up first, I use the old coffee mill my grandmother used (she was born 1908) for years and which I remember from my childhood (we would take turns in grinding the coffee!).
It is not impeccable but still works. I know I need about 60 rounds for one cup of coffee, so less than two minutes for his two cups.

I look on the classified ads for my town from time to time and there are similar mills on sale, some newer, some older. But as long as the old one works I will not replace it.
IMG_20210301_142751.jpg
Grandma's mill
Grandma's mil
 
Posts: 3
Location: Toronto, Canada
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...but the work of grinding they leave it all to me.[/quote wrote:

Keeps those muscles strong!

 
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Location: England
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If someone is a coffee geek or wants a grinder for long years I highly recommend Comandante C40 MK3.
+ High-Nitrogen Stainless Steel Burrs
+ 40g Capacity
+ 2 jars (one dark and one clear) with lids
+ All plastic parts are made of Tritan BPA-free plastic.
+ Very good grinding quality.

- Price, but I think for this quality it is adequate.

 
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Posts: 662
Location: the mountains of western nc
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that’s great. my wife was given one just like that to play with as a child in the 80’s...she still uses it, it’s the only coffee grinder in the house.

edit: oops. this post was in reply to roberta at the bottom of the previous page.
 
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thomas rubino wrote:Inherited this from my mom.  She inherited it from her mom.    Still grinding  after 100 years.

I have her hand crank stone burr grain mill as well.



That is an incredible work of art and mechanic! proof that when things are made well, we shouldn't need to replace them for decades. I hope to see "planned obsolescence" disappear in the future. Your coffee grinder is incredible.
 
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Location: southern oregon
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made in spain, take apart to clean, adjustable steel grinding burrs...fresh grind everymorn for 35yrs.
IMG_2871.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2871.JPG]
IMG_2872.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_2872.JPG]
 
Valerie Hird
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randal cranor wrote:made in spain, take apart to clean, adjustable steel grinding burrs...fresh grind everymorn for 35yrs.



absolutely stunning!
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