Win a copy of Permaculture Playing Cards this week in the Permaculture forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

Growing Jujubes from seed (and general Jujube feedback)

 
Posts: 25
Location: Uruguay / Switzerland
hugelkultur forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Carefuly cracking and removing the Jujube seed shells worked great for me. 100% sprouting quote and it took only 2-3 days. With this particular tool, which englush Name I dont know, its easy to open the shells Carefuly step by step..
DSC_1786.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSC_1786.JPG]
 
Aaron Hartwig
Posts: 25
Location: Uruguay / Switzerland
hugelkultur forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just bought this Ziziphus plant In a local vivero. Can anyone identify it by the pictures?
Greetings from Uruguay!
DSC_1801.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSC_1801.JPG]
DSC_1800.JPG
[Thumbnail for DSC_1800.JPG]
 
Posts: 5
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've lurked for awhile, but I just signed up for an account so I could let you know. Those round jujube seeds are actually grown for the seed, not the fruit. (The name spinosa is another clue) That is why they're available to buy in a pack. They are typically cracked and then boiled to make a tea. It is used in Chinese medicine to help with insomnia and is supposed to be calming for children with ADD. There is a region in China that grows a lot of that herb, but I don't know if the fruit part is typically eaten or not. It seems like a lot of the varieties for eating fresh have long pointy seeds, although I think I have purchased dried ones with round seeds. I'm guessing perhaps those are ones for drying. My Chinese relatives (I'm not Chinese) tell  me that some are not meant to be eaten as a snack, just dried and used in tea or soup. The dried fruit boiled in a tea is also traditionally used to help with insomnia, and I think anemia.

http://www.itmonline.org/arts/zizyphus.htm

Reference and recipe (for using the seed herb) in this book:

https://www.amazon.com/Ancient-Wisdom-Modern-Kitchen-Recipes/dp/073821325X/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=ancient+wisdom+modern+kitchen&qid=1551648792&s=gateway&sr=8-1
 
Posts: 17
Location: North Canterbury - New Zealand
hugelkultur duck forest garden
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I purchased some dehulled Jujube seed from Foxgreen Farm / https://jiovi.com In July 2018 (about a year ago) which I planted almost immediately into a tray in the greenhouse.

Being located in New Zealand, this was mid winter.

Germination rate was about 50%, pretty good by my experience with imported seed and the feedback from other growers.

A year on I have about half left alive, about 20 - 30cm tall in 3 litre pots (do the math imperialists, see how you like it...)

Of these about half are single stem and the rest are multi branching from ground level, there is obvious variation in leaf shape and colour

Having attempted and lost purchased Jujube trees in the past, growing from seed seemed like it would improve my chances at lower cost.

I'm tempted to plant mine out this coming spring but the destination location is rather harsh and out of site / mind and I'm afraid they might get a little neglected and then swamped by weeds so I'll probably wait another year. Or do half soon but in a closer and more monitored location....

Having never even tasted a Jujube I have no fixed expectations about what I might get out of all this.
 
gardener
Posts: 2807
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
610
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Whoo, time for an update!  

My original "Li" cultivar plant bought in a pot at an Asian grocery in 2014 has now had six summers in the ground, and five winters.  It is at least 14 feet tall, but so slim and flexible that I can bend the top parts down into my reach without damaging it.  This season for the very first time it made perhaps half a dozen fruit, but due to my road trip to Portland I only got three fruit picked and two of those had been found by the ants, who where merrily burrowing in.  Since I do not have a pollinator, the seeds are indeed hollow, empty, and thus sterile.  I am very pleased with the fruit; it is very sweet and has a nice crunch, although the sort of woody mouthfeel that is the signature of ripe jujube fruits takes some getting used to.  

I wrote elsewhere in this thread about finding feral jujube bushes on the property of a friend.  I haven't had a lot of luck germinating those seeds either, but fortunately he hasn't had much luck poisoning his jujube patch.  He was sounding more determined this summer so I dug up several small trees at his place and planted them in buckets.  Didn't get much root ball and some of them died, but I have one really healthy/happy bucket tree now and another that seems still to be alive, if only barely.  My plan is to grow them out a bit in the buckets and then transplant them to my orchard, in hopes that they will serve as a pollinator for my Li.  

I have three apple trees that I planted at the same time as the Li jujube that still haven't made a single fruit.  They are healthy looking and I am sure it's just a matter of time, but my conclusion is that jujubes are better suited to my conditions than apples.  So I do need more!

jujubes-on-tree-2019.jpg
unripe jujubes
unripe jujubes
jujube-on-tree-2019.jpg
unripe jujubes on tree
unripe jujubes on tree
fresh-jujube.jpg
fresh jujube fruit
fresh jujube fruit
 
gardener
Posts: 2778
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
543
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted 2 Li Jujubes here in 8a Central Texas. I can tell you with 100% confidence that these are the best trees i have ever grown. I love the looks of them. It looks like the tree could be in the moviie  "A nightmare before Christmas". It is so beautiful in a dark kind of way. The branches come out at a 90 degree angle from a single vertical trunk..  The leaves are green with no browning or evidence of disease or stress.

Pick any other tree i have to compare to. Paw paw, peach, pecan, persimmon, walnut, plums  etc. The jujube is perfect in comparison.



 
Aaron Hartwig
Posts: 25
Location: Uruguay / Switzerland
hugelkultur forest garden urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank You Sharon for those very interesting informations. I am definitely interested in the medicinal use of jujube as well. Healthy medicine for curing Insomnia or add like conditions are a good thing to have access to.

The jujubes that grew from the seeds (on the pictures) didn't grow particular much in the first year but therefore survived inside pots somewhere in my Garden without taking care for a whole year!

The jujube tree I had bought in a Vivero and planted into my garden also didn't grow particular much. (The people in the Vivero didn't know what kind of jujube variety they where selling... the leaves look different then those from Dan's trees

I won't give up on my Jujube plans that fast...  

This Winter I will be in my beloved Garden in Uruguay (there will be summer then ;) and see if they grew more. I built a little tree nursery so my young trees are more protected.

275e48fc-1ef0-4d43-bfa6-6379e497a988.jpg
little tree nursery
little tree nursery
Y-DHhVTgQoye2n-ilIrjnw.jpg
catapillar
catapillar
 
Posts: 95
Location: Fairplay, Northern California
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anyone have advice for me?  I'm planning on moving a young jujube, out of a shady area where it isn't producting flowers or fruit and into full sun.  It's been grown from seed, is 3-4 years old, eight feet tall, nice and sturdy.  

I plan on putting it near its two little brothers.  If moving is liable to be a failure I'll just take it out. Is it worth the trouble?
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 2778
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
543
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jane Reed wrote:Anyone have advice for me?  I'm planning on moving a young jujube, out of a shady area where it isn't producting flowers or fruit and into full sun.  It's been grown from seed, is 3-4 years old, eight feet tall, nice and sturdy.  

I plan on putting it near its two little brothers.  If moving is liable to be a failure I'll just take it out. Is it worth the trouble?



Move it when its dormant. Zach weiss told me a story about sepp holzer in regards to tree planting. He said spectators(volunteers, homeowner, etc) literally cringe when sepp is relocating trees. He seems very ruff with them. The rationale is that if the tree can't take a little abuse, it's not worth having.

We had to move a dozen trees when my earthworks were done.  It had to be done in late spring. We had no choice. I was surprised at the success rate. Any losses were my inability to keep them watered thru the summer. These were 3 year old trees. They just got to what i consider stable. Relocating means its now a new planted tree and needs the care (watering) of a newly planted tree. I did not stay on top of it.

There's a reason why earthworks comes first. Lol. I learned it real good.
 
Dan Boone
gardener
Posts: 2807
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
610
forest garden trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jane Reed wrote:I'm planning on moving a young jujube, out of a shady area where it isn't producting flowers or fruit and into full sun.  It's been grown from seed, is 3-4 years old, eight feet tall, nice and sturdy.  

I plan on putting it near its two little brothers.  If moving is liable to be a failure I'll just take it out. Is it worth the trouble?



I don't think it's worth the trouble, nor necessary.  My jujube took six growing seasons to produce its first fruit.  I have not read that Jujubes are unusually demanding of full sun, or that the time it took my tree to start fruiting is unusual.  Many fruit trees need five-plus years to start bearing fruit.  I have a couple of apple trees the same age as the Jujube that haven't flowered yet, plus another that's flowered several times but not yet produced a fruit.  It just takes time, is how I see things.  I wouldn't dream of moving my trees and risk losing them after all these years of patient waiting.
 
wayne fajkus
gardener
Posts: 2778
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
543
cattle chicken bee sheep
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When i researched the tree, i had read that it will not fruit in shade. If anyone has first hand knowledge please give it. Mine is semi shaded. I found out after planting. But in my case the tree shading it will come down. Its probably coming down either way.
 
Jane Reed
Posts: 95
Location: Fairplay, Northern California
6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was fairly sure sun was necessary.  The 2 little brothers, which are only a little younger, have already produced some flowers and tiny fruit.  The big shrub is in the shadow of my 2 storey house in the a.m. and gets filtered shade for the second half of the day. Even shrubs and trees that are tolerant of shade won't perform well under those conditions.  They may grow well but fruiting, I believe, will always be very sparse.

Is there something I should know about moving a jujube in particular? Has anyone done it?  I agree with the above poster who advised to wait till it was dormant.  I also imagine a severe pruning will need to be done prior to digging it up.  
 
Your mother was a hamster and your father was a tiny ad:
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!