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! Off grid for women alone

 
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:

Judith Browning wrote:

Years ago, for only a few months in my early twenties I lived alone in a tent and then a one room off grid cabin and when word got around that there was a single young woman in the woods I had visitors.  Nothing I couldn't handle and I suppose some even had good intentions but all quite annoying because of the supposition that as a woman alone I needed their 'help'.


 




There are certain pieces of equipment that I think of as enough of a unique entity, that I actually give them names. Like the modular scaffolding (which, to be honest, I'm still collecting parts for) that can be assembled into all kinds of configurations. It's name is Steve.

I wonder if saying the name out loud might help get people to back off? "Thanks for the offer, but no. Steve and I can handle it ourselves."

(I must be tired. My brain is stuck in Silliness mode.)



Ellendra, I love this! I name things too, and I am super silly when I'm tired. Lmao! Thanks for the good laugh. I needed it today.
 
Opal-Lia Palmer
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Heather Davies wrote:I'm in my late 40s and am buying property with no services on it. I'll be off-grid while I build something to live in and put in the gardens, fruit trees, etc. I work on my computer though so I'll be tied to the grid at some point for internet and electric. I'd prefer to skip it, but what can you do...

Like Stacy, I'm more concerned about getting help with projects than my safety. That said, I've heard a huge mountain lion has repeatedly been spotted walking along the treeline where the mountain meets the valley across the road from the property. Between that guy and the bears, I may invest in a rifle if I get animals.

Jules, thanks for your excellent advice. It really resonated with me. I can't help but come off as scary when I react to being pushed, especially by men. I've lost count of how many have called me intimidating. I'm going to use that and the tools I wear when working to my advantage if necessary. So far though, everyone I've met has been okay. Maybe a little old-school sexist, but not threatening.

If there are any ladies (alone or otherwise) in NE Washington/N Idaho who want to connect, let me know. It'd be great to have some local permie friends, and I'd love to see and/or hear about what you're up to!



I'm going to send you a purple moosage :-)
 
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Sandy Ann wrote:Hi
I've been following and watching many off Grid stories but I noticed it seems to attract mainly men. Are there any girls out there doing off grid alone?
I'd love to hear from you






I purchased 10 acres in northeast Nevada about several years ago. Now that I'm retired my dream of homesteading can now start to become a reality. Time to start putting all that information I've been collecting over the years into some practical application. As a child growing up in L.A. I loved frontier films and specifically Grizzly Adams. I'd love to live in the mountains of Montana but I found property prices were high and going up, so looks like NE Nevada may have to be the location I start my homestead. And this 52 year old lady will get'er done no matter what. Trail and error and learning from other. Nothing is too hard when your mindset is determined to do it.
 
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I want to in Australia. I have 2 school aged children. Hardest part is that I can afford land without working and I'd really like to home school the youngest. I don't need a man for much of anything, I reckon we could do it ourselves and outsource what we couldn't.
 
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Location: North Patagonia, Chile
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I just moved to live alone (a couple of months ago) in a small village in northern Patagonia. I live off grid in a cabin, with no electricity and water from a spring. I charge my phone and computer and my external batteries with a portable solar panel and sometimes walk a couple of kilometers to charge them with electricity from my neighbors (on rainy days with no sun), I wash my clothes by hand, my shower is outside the house, my kitchen works with firewood and my WC is outside (a few steps from the house).
Since I arrived a few months ago, much of my time and energy has been invested in improving the house (built for summer) and preparing for winter (with many snow days and freezing temperatures). It is true that living alone is not easy, you have to learn to use your time well, use the resources you have wisely, be strong and above all, trust yourself!
Here people always ask me "are you alone? Do you do everything by yourself? aren't you afraid of living here alone? And I answer yes, I am alone, I do everything by myself and no, I am not afraid, I am very happy! :) ...and I am!
At the beginning the neighbors looked at me with distrust and disbelief (a girl from the city comes to live alone in the mountains, it will only last a few weeks, for sure) but a few months later they realized that I am a strong woman and that yes, I can live alone! They have been integrating me into the community and have shared their experiences and knowledge with me (just a few days ago I received a 25kilos bag of potatoes, as *payment for help them with the harvest).
On the house I have also tried wool as an insulator, I will do some tests with earth and straw in some walls (I am a builder and I specialize in building with natural materials). There is always a natural material around us to work with! ;)
I think the hardest thing about living "alone" is facing those inner fears. The voice in our head that tells us hat we can't do it. To come face to face with our fears, with our insecurities...
But it's also okay to accept when we need help!
Luckily we live in times of internet and we have these support networks, I don't have electricity but I have excellent internet and phone signal that allows me to call my friends and families whenever my strength is failing or just when I want to share my love with them.
Thank you Purity for your words, truly inspiring! And thank you all for sharing your experiences!
Hugs from the South of the World
Claudia
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Posts: 93
Location: Landers, CA
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Clau.....Bravo!  It always warms my heart to hear of others who walk this Path and over-come the challenges day by day.  I just finished watching a great movie on YouTube called July Rising.  It is very true to life about a young woman trying to farm alone after she inherits her grandfather's farm.  Most commenting only saw failure and heartbreak at the end.......but she walked away with a ton of money....enough so that she could start small, pay cash and never be beholding to others.  This is a great lesson....learning to be truly self-sufficient.  You can't be if you owe others money for your piece of heaven. Thank you Clau, for sharing your Journey with us.  My dwellings are also small on my land....and nothing is more wonderful that sitting here looking out the window and seeing, all around me, the fruit and nut trees, the gardens.....the birds singing in the trees.  I can't imagine any other way of living.
 
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