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How to Save Money on Groceries

 
pollinator
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s. ayalp wrote: Simple-cooking, as I call it, is cheaper, way faster and -I think- healthier. Search for recepies of the world cussine that have 5 or less main ingredients. Or try to simplify your recepies.


There are some tasty dishes with 5 or less ingredients. If all the ingredients are top quality and if you additionally have good herbs/spices on hand.
For example a freshly baked bread, tomatoes and basil from the garden, a good mozzarella cheese and excellent olive oil.

But often I like to have more flavours to blend.
I usually do "simple cooking" when I make typical dishes that my children like (and that I liked as a kid):
Pancakes (neutral), either with sweet filling or filled with grated cheese.
Kaiserschmarrn, a fluffy sweet omelette powdered with sugar and served with apple sauce.
Potato pancakes (or latkes, as some would call it) with a bit of onion, an egg, served with apple sauce or sour cream.

Maybe pasta with a good homemade tomato sauce.

However, normally I always prefer to have some interesting ingredients and have several small dishes instead of one. Those dishes don't have to have expensive or exotic ingredients, but I like the variety (like in mezze).
My husband on the other hand is happy with pasta with butter, rice with butter, polenta with butter, mashed potatoes with butter etc. (which he would cook when he was single or when I am sick). I would certainly starve on such a diet.

I know that some Germans who live in traditional German families (with parents who never travelled and who never tried out dishes from other cultures) prefer very bland meals with no "spice" whatsoever. A pizza is the most they would dare. They try neither mushrooms, olives, seafood, capers, hot spices, garlic or similar.
When I read some time ago that boiled eggs with mustard sauce (bechamel with mustard) is considered a treat by some Germans I thought I was missing out as I never had that. Now I am convinced I didn't miss anything!
 
master gardener
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In the county of 8000 that I live in, there are people who have never traveled outside of it. And, in a similar manner, their tastes fall along the line of meat and potatoes.  I suspect salt and pepper stretch their limits.
 
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Leftovers were going to waste far too often for my comfort level.  Now I do "rollovers" instead.  Leftover meat from tacos goes into a spaghetti sauce for the next day.  Chicken breasts leftover from Italian chicken get the seasoning rinsed off and into the crockpot for Tortilla Soup.  Veggies that are half cut go into a stirfry, etc.  By using them the next day, they don't become refrigerator science experiments or freezer "How long has THIS been in here?" items.

Another thing, get to know your butcher.  We buy most beef from the same store because it's grass-fed.  Our butcher marks stuff down at 7 pm, 5 pm on Sundays.  As often as possible, I try to do my shopping shortly after that.
 
pollinator
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Anita Martin wrote:

I know that some Germans who live in traditional German families (with parents who never travelled and who never tried out dishes from other cultures) prefer very bland meals with no "spice" whatsoever. A pizza is the most they would dare. They try neither mushrooms, olives, seafood, capers, hot spices, garlic or similar.
When I read some time ago that boiled eggs with mustard sauce (bechamel with mustard) is considered a treat by some Germans I thought I was missing out as I never had that. Now I am convinced I didn't miss anything!



Swap "Germany" for "Denmark" and it's exactly the same my husband had never eaten chinese food or indian before he met me. dinner with his folks is potatoes with meat and veg every night. Ok they eat a lot of fish, but only plaice and herring. as to the eggs, they have that here to it's a cream and mustard sauce here and it's served on slices of rye bread normally for Easter.
 
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