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Anyone own or recommend a grain mill?

 
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I am just starting the journey of finding a grain mill. There is a ton of information in this post. I really appreciate being able to learn from others. I am looking into growing my own grain as I have had to let go of my cows and have to have something to grow that doesn't get out of fences. I was looking at amaranth and Einhorn wheat. I also want to be able to grind fine flour as well as regular. And looking at being off grid a hand crank one. I know it is a substantial investment so I want to get the right one the first time. I am going back through all the posts now but if anyone wants to make a recommendation I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks everyone
 
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I bought a small grain grinder and now do not want to bo back... My 12 yr old Granddaughter wants one so giving her the small one for BDay- Christmas gift and just bought one 2X the size!
 
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I got an electric one that also has a hand crank just in case the power is out.
 
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Location: 7b Western NC
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Country Living for us.     Suggest Laurels Kitchen bread book.as a guide text......... great to learn the variables, adjustments, ie, humidity, elevation,    chewy , grainy, too coarse, too fine etc. and science of breadmaking best among the dozens of book available
 
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Location: North Georgia USA
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No longer being made, but if you find a used Miller Boy at a decent price might want to grab it. Stones not burrs, wooden cabinet, hand crank but can be motorized. Wife bought hers in the early 80s and it still works. Just found an article stating it sold for $180 in 1978 ($744 adjusted for inflation) Do not see any current listings, one or two closed ones that went for less than what it sold for new.
 
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I have a Country Living Mill. I like it but for me it takes a long time to grind small amounts of fine flour. I would like to motorize it soon, my kids don't like turning it all the time
 
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Following
 
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Location: USDA Zone 9 A San Jacinto, California
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I have had the same electric Magic Mill by Bosch since 1992. Upgraded from a hand crank when I got my first paycheck as a nurse in 1985–that one melted in a house fire. I grind about qt cups of grain per week these days now that the kids have flown the nest.
 
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Catie George wrote:Thanks for all the insight!!!

It looks like if I go with manual, I should seriously consider the country living mill based on the glowing reviews, but a wonder junior may also be okay. I have tasked my dad into digging through the junk collection, as I am looking into this, I have a vague memory as of 15 years ago or so we had some sort of Corona style grinder from a garage sale. The question is did it move with us or not....

I am considering my own laziness, and thinking about electric. As a lot of the recipes I use take 5 cups of flour, I am more likely to use it if its electric. The Komo and the wondermill seem to be the easiest to find, though the nutrimill is also available.

Those of you with the whisper/wonder mills, what do you think of them (other than the noise level?)



I got a wonder mill jr and didn't really like it. It was way to hard to mill flour fine enough to actually use.
 
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We have a great Mill Buying guide here: https://pleasanthillgrain.com/resources/grain-mill-comparison-feature-review. I personally love the KoMo Classic. It's what I use at home and it's super quick and easy to use. It's a beautiful feature sitting on my counter and it's so handy to use. You simply turn it on and fill the hopper with grain. No set up and very little clean up necessary! It can grind a fine flour or you can turn the hopper to adjust the stones to give you a coarse texture.

I understand the desire for a hand crank option with both stone and steel burrs. The steel burrs are nice if you want to grind anything oily. The Wonder Junior Deluxe is an excellent choice for this as it comes with both the stone and steel burrs. You can find out more about that option here (and it's in stock!): https://pleasanthillgrain.com/wonder-junior-deluxe-manual-grain-mill
 
Jane Wilder-O'Connor
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Location: USDA Zone 9 A San Jacinto, California
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Thank you for the information on the KoMo. I had not heard of this mill, but after watching the video and reading about it, I will put this on my purchase list when my current mill inevitably gets too old to function.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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