• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Non-Electric Gadgets

 
Posts: 93
5
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a hand cranked outboard boat motor from my grandfather who passed away 20 years ago at age 103. No idea what year the motor is from but actually used it once.
 
Posts: 107
Location: Czech Republic; East Bohemia; Latitude 50˚ 12' 34"
13
3
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kim Hill wrote:I have a hand cranked outboard boat motor from my grandfather who passed away 20 years ago at age 103. No idea what year the motor is from but actually used it once.



Can you post a picture or it? I’m curious as to what it looks like.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2533
Location: Maine, zone 5
1161
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
While looking for something completely different I stumbled across this one for a kayak.  Amazon sells it for about $900....might be a fun project to make one.
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 2533
Location: Maine, zone 5
1161
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is what I was looking for!

https://www.core77.com/posts/17931/r2b2-christoph-thetards-human-powered-kitchen-appliances-17931
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 2533
Location: Maine, zone 5
1161
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder what the gear ratio would have to be for a pedal powered tractor like this?


Or for a snow plow like this!


Do you guys think these are just for fun or might one actually be able to design them well enough to be practical?
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 2533
Location: Maine, zone 5
1161
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The snow plow guy has videos!


 
Jason Learned
Posts: 107
Location: Czech Republic; East Bohemia; Latitude 50˚ 12' 34"
13
3
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:This is what I was looking for!


https://www.core77.com/posts/17931/r2b2-christoph-thetards-human-powered-kitchen-appliances-17931


Really cool!
 
Kim Hill
Posts: 93
5
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jason Learned wrote:

Kim Hill wrote:I have a hand cranked outboard boat motor from my grandfather who passed away 20 years ago at age 103. No idea what year the motor is from but actually used it once.



Can you post a picture or it? I’m curious as to what it looks like.



Right now it is out of my reach but I will try.
 
Posts: 82
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Su Ba wrote:Gosh, I used a manual typewriter for decades before finally switching to a computer because of the word processing feature.


I used a manual typewriter in high school and college and remember lots of eraser-worn pages, backspacing for underlining, no bolding or italics, and everything in Courier typeface. Going to word-processing software was very freeing and a creativity boost.

Actually, writing with pen or pencil has some advantages, but it's useless for email -- or Permies comments.
 
David Wieland
Posts: 82
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
... the 8 year expected lifetime of the mower.


I wouldn't consider mowing my acre with my push mower (bought for the small yard of my previous home), but it still works fine nearly 30 years later.
 
David Wieland
Posts: 82
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
8
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:I wonder what the gear ratio would have to be for a pedal powered tractor like this?


Or for a snow plow like this!


Do you guys think these are just for fun or might one actually be able to design them well enough to be practical?


Definitely just for fun -- or testing design and construction skills.
 
pollinator
Posts: 256
Location: Geraldton, Ontario -Zone 1b
55
hugelkultur forest garden foraging tiny house wood heat
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have at least ten different types of snow shovels that have cost several hundred dollars in total. We live on a private road that doesn't get plowed by the town, so we're on our own to maintain the road. My only neighbours have recently left their homes for the comforts of town so now I'm on my own. When we moved here 5 years ago there were 3 plowtrucks among the neighbours and someone was always able to get the snow cleared. Now there are none. Last year I tried shovelling and realized it's possible. The road from our driveway to the plowed road is about 1500 feet and it took me about 9 hours over 6 days to shovel a recent 10inch snowfall. There's a contractor with a front end loader with big blade that will plow the road for about $100, so I figure I'm earning a very modest wage by doing it myself and staying in shape through the winter. The irony is that we don't even have a vehicle, so we're maintaining the road for visitors.
 
Posts: 22
Location: Montrose, United States
22
cat purity books food preservation wood heat homestead
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I picked up this 5" hand cranked grinder at a yard sale for $1.00. It's come in handy for putting an edge on tools and even shaping some soft metal.
grinder-72.jpg
[Thumbnail for grinder-72.jpg]
 
Posts: 19
5
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The best thing we ever bought was a hand-cranked stainless steel baby food grinder. Looked like this but was all metal, don't remember where we bought it. Every meal we would take whatever we were eating and put it through the grinder for instant baby food. I often wonder if this is why my kids grew up eating everything on their plates.

Screen-Shot-2020-11-21-at-3.46.49-PM.png
[Thumbnail for Screen-Shot-2020-11-21-at-3.46.49-PM.png]
 
Lynne Cim
Posts: 19
5
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't think I saw a pasta maker listed yet.  We use this often, works great.


Screen-Shot-2020-11-21-at-4.04.09-PM.png
[Thumbnail for Screen-Shot-2020-11-21-at-4.04.09-PM.png]
 
David Wieland
Posts: 82
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lynne Cim wrote:The best thing we ever bought was a hand-cranked stainless steel baby food grinder.


This is a great example of a valuable tool/appliance that, as far as I know, has no electric version and doesn't need one. The Happy Baby Food Grinder (plastic body) got lots of use with both our children, and my wife and I gave one to new parents we knew.
 
pollinator
Posts: 771
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
114
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I wonder if the world is ready for a pedal powered power takeoff that has a gearbox and universal fitting so attachments like blenders, mixers, mincers, cream separators, mills, and all these other gadgets can run off.
 
pollinator
Posts: 213
Location: Japan, roughly zone 9b - wet and warm climate
72
hugelkultur kids forest garden trees cooking woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I almost always prefer non-electric, manual solutions, with a few exceptions. One of the biggest reasons is I get my exercise as part of the work I need to do instead of using a power tool to save time to then use that free time to go to the gym to workout to get fit. Classic two-birds one stone.

On a regular basis I use: a nata (japanese axe/machete), silky hand saw, telescoping silky saw, splitting wedges, mallets, woodworking handtools, a manual coffee grinder, a bicycle (less than I want...), etc etc.

I am consistently impressed with the efficiency of modern hand tools. Silky saws for example can be faster than chainsaws in some situations.
 
David Wieland
Posts: 82
Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ken Newman wrote:I picked up this 5" hand cranked grinder at a yard sale for $1.00. It's come in handy for putting an edge on tools and even shaping some soft metal.


Well, the price was right, but needing to crank with one hand leaves only one hand to hold the tool being sharpened -- unless you have an assistant. I much prefer two-handed control with a grinding wheel.
 
Posts: 11
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Who would have thought Tupperware would provide a tool that could land itself on this list. It's called a Power Chef and genuinely is a great little rig. I live with only a few solar panels, so power is limited most of the time. I came across this accidentally and bought it second-hand, though unused. This thing is sharp enough to chop a whole carrot in moments and can make a smoothie with just a few pulls. Honestly. It's great.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TibDd4RIcEE
 
Posts: 7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
the estimates I remember for scything grain is 1 acre per day for an adult male ,experienced and in awesome shape.
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, this is a popular thread! I saw it mentioned already but I thought it deserved another post - mortar and pestle. I worked on a farm where this was our primary means of grinding coffee, and the coffee was amazing! We had a separate mortar and pestle for grinding spices, and that was not a time consuming process. Easy to use, very effective, and in terms of making coffee in the morning it is a nice part of the daily routine!
 
Posts: 2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Does anybody have a non-electric alternative to a toaster that can be used in the kitchen (i.e. not outdoor campfire cooking gear)? Love toast, hate single-use electric appliances!
 
Posts: 86
Location: Upstate New York
33
chicken solar rocket stoves
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just found this gadget for sale locally for grinding coffee, dried beans, corn, etc. I want it but not sure how well it works. Anyone ever used one?
hand-crank-grinder.png
[Thumbnail for hand-crank-grinder.png]
 
M Wilcox
Posts: 86
Location: Upstate New York
33
chicken solar rocket stoves
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

David Wieland wrote:

Ken Newman wrote:I picked up this 5" hand cranked grinder at a yard sale for $1.00. It's come in handy for putting an edge on tools and even shaping some soft metal.


Well, the price was right, but needing to crank with one hand leaves only one hand to hold the tool being sharpened -- unless you have an assistant. I much prefer two-handed control with a grinding wheel.



I bet it wouldn't be too hard to switch out the hand crank for a foot pedal so you could use 2 hands.
 
Posts: 8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Missy Hall wrote:Does anybody have a non-electric alternative to a toaster that can be used in the kitchen (i.e. not outdoor campfire cooking gear)? Love toast, hate single-use electric appliances!




http://www.deltatoast.com/
 
M Wilcox
Posts: 86
Location: Upstate New York
33
chicken solar rocket stoves
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mostly I just rub some butter on top of my wood stove (I keep it clean) and plop my bread right on the surface. Flip it over to toast on the other side.

I bought one of these camp toasters below for my gas range. I like it. I know you said no camp toasters but it works well. Prolly wouldn't do on an electric stove.


camp-toaster.png
[Thumbnail for camp-toaster.png]
 
Posts: 6
Location: North Carolina
1
dog trees chicken
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lehman's in Kidron Ohio has everything non electric. They supply to the large Amish population every non electric item that you could imagine. You can search for what you need by website or a requested catalog.
 
gardener
Posts: 1108
Location: Western Kentucky
457
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

M Wilcox wrote:I just found this gadget for sale locally for grinding coffee, dried beans, corn, etc. I want it but not sure how well it works. Anyone ever used one?


I have one. It's hard work grind flour, and mine doesn't make it as fine as I'd like, but if it's cheap enough, it could still be handy to have.
 
gardener
Posts: 571
Location: Southern Germany
288
kids books urban chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

David Wieland wrote:

Greg Martin wrote:I wonder what the gear ratio would have to be for a pedal powered tractor like this?


Do you guys think these are just for fun or might one actually be able to design them well enough to be practical?


Definitely just for fun -- or testing design and construction skills.



I really don't know if I remember correctly, and I have not found a picture to prove it, but I think I saw a pedal powered plough in Chinese rice fields in the 1990ies around Yangshuo.
Husband said he took a photo but it is buried in hundreds or thousands of paper photos somewhere in our house.

It looked like the farmer was cycling through the rice paddy and I don't think it was motor powered.
As I can't find any proof maybe my memory plays tricks on me - we definitely rode bikes on that day, so maybe that is a mixup ;-)
 
Missy Hall
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

M Wilcox wrote:Mostly I just rub some butter on top of my wood stove (I keep it clean) and plop my bread right on the surface. Flip it over to toast on the other side.

I bought one of these camp toasters below for my gas range. I like it. I know you said no camp toasters but it works well. Prolly wouldn't do on an electric stove.




That camp toaster looks perfect - Now that I see your photo I'm good with camp toasters, just as long as they can be used indoors over a gas range. Thanks!
 
pollinator
Posts: 597
Location: South-central Wisconsin
223
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Missy Hall wrote:Does anybody have a non-electric alternative to a toaster that can be used in the kitchen (i.e. not outdoor campfire cooking gear)? Love toast, hate single-use electric appliances!



Just lay the bread on a griddle. If you like your toast buttered, butter the griddle before laying the bread on it. (Buttering the griddle and not the bread keeps the bread from getting soggy with butter.)

I used to make toast on a wood stove by laying the bread directly on top. Skip the butter if you're doing it that way, stoves are harder to clean than griddles!
 
gardener
Posts: 2074
Location: South of Capricorn
842
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

M Wilcox wrote:I just found this gadget for sale locally for grinding coffee, dried beans, corn, etc. I want it but not sure how well it works. Anyone ever used one?


I have one of these. For grinding cornmeal and coffee it works great. Not a very smooth powdery grind, but okay. In fact ideal for the coarser grind of coffee I want.
I bought it to grind masa corn or to crack malt for brewing (it is not good at all for that purpose, just FYI). I ended up using my omega juicer for masa, but if the juicer goes I will come back to this grinder. Works well for wet and dry. My only complaint is that I need to rig up a Rube Goldberg type system to have the end product fall into a bag or go down a slide, the output chute is so close to the table that you can't fit a bowl under it.
 
Ellendra Nauriel
pollinator
Posts: 597
Location: South-central Wisconsin
223
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tereza Okava wrote:

M Wilcox wrote:I just found this gadget for sale locally for grinding coffee, dried beans, corn, etc. I want it but not sure how well it works. Anyone ever used one?


I have one of these. For grinding cornmeal and coffee it works great. Not a very smooth powdery grind, but okay. In fact ideal for the coarser grind of coffee I want.
I bought it to grind masa corn or to crack malt for brewing (it is not good at all for that purpose, just FYI). I ended up using my omega juicer for masa, but if the juicer goes I will come back to this grinder. Works well for wet and dry. My only complaint is that I need to rig up a Rube Goldberg type system to have the end product fall into a bag or go down a slide, the output chute is so close to the table that you can't fit a bowl under it.




Build a sturdy wooden box, just a little bigger than the "foot" of the grinder. Bolt the grinder to the top of the box. Clamp the bottom of the box to the table. (Or, if it's a permanent fixture, bolt the box to the table itself.)
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2074
Location: South of Capricorn
842
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
you've just described my Rube Goldberg system! Clamp and a box and a clamp and a box....
 
Jordan Holland
gardener
Posts: 1108
Location: Western Kentucky
457
dog gear foraging trees hunting food preservation cooking fiber arts woodworking wood heat rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tereza Okava wrote:you've just described my Rube Goldberg system! Clamp and a box and a clamp and a box....


I just used a plate, lol!
 
pollinator
Posts: 544
Location: Chicago
157
dog forest garden fish foraging urban cooking food preservation bike
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jesse Seven wrote:Wow, this is a popular thread! I saw it mentioned already but I thought it deserved another post - mortar and pestle. I worked on a farm where this was our primary means of grinding coffee, and the coffee was amazing! We had a separate mortar and pestle for grinding spices, and that was not a time consuming process. Easy to use, very effective, and in terms of making coffee in the morning it is a nice part of the daily routine!



Mortar and pestle are great nut crackers also, you can do 5-10 nuts a time depending on the type, and with a delicate hand it takes just a few blows to crack the shells just right and extract the nuts whole.
 
Mk Neal
pollinator
Posts: 544
Location: Chicago
157
dog forest garden fish foraging urban cooking food preservation bike
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This grinds enough for about a 24 oz pot of coffee.  Difficulty depends on how dark the roast and how fine you set the grind.  All wood and steel.
20210301_210723.jpg
Zassenhaus grinder
Zassenhaus grinder
 
Posts: 11
Location: egypt, pokhara, ladakh, dharamshala
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi there-  I understand your concern here, the issues can get convoluted, certainly.....I think the idea on manual labour is though,
that we remove the need for those 9 calories to COME FROM the industrial sector. Instead, we expend labour, result in produce or
upmarket food items- peanut butter, jams, whatnot- and forget about the 9 calories formula altogether.

Effectively, we are putting aside the industrial completely when we go manual, and we GET what we PUT into each process.
Of course, the more efficient we can make a hand-crank gadget means less labour on our part, and more result. so, I
really applaud any mechanical types out there- PLEASE do some design/build work, we LOVE the gadgets!!

In short, the industrials are in there in the first place, due to opportunistic industries looking to provide goods
and services to the mainstream. Going manual removes us from those goods and services- as long as we can replace
what the industrial has been providing, with the products of our own making.
Does this make sense? Now, yes it depends on how much time and energy we all have, to DO these daily efforts!
- im
 
what if we put solar panels on top of the semi truck trailer? That could power this tiny ad:
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic