• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Mike Haasl
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Rob Lineberger
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Ash Jackson
  • Jordan Holland

Pics from Greg's Forest Garden

 
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some quinces on one of my quince trees.  I'm struggling with these as the varieties I have are prone to damage from fire blight.  I'm going to have to replace them (makes me very sad).  I really hope to somehow get my hands on fire blight resistant quinces as I love these trees in flower as well as in fruit.  But if not I'll figure out something else for these spots.
20190817_102134.jpg
quinces
quinces
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Enough pics for now....just one last one of my laptop cover for fun :)  Thanks for checking out my pics!
20190817_162301.jpg
Gir making my labtop look good!
Gir making my labtop look good!
 
pollinator
Posts: 138
Location: Idaho
67
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow Greg! I love the jungliness (not a word, I know) of your forest garden. We're just at the start of building our forest garden in our new place so this gives me some great inspiration.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Robin.  One of the things I love about it is that every year for more than a decade I've gotten to experience multiple new tastes I'd otherwise likely never have gotten to try....and almost all have been very good experiences :)

Here's another plant I love that I've introduced over about a half acre of my gardens, Allium tricoccum….ramps.  This picture is from springtime and they are growing around the base of a serviceberry.  They are spring ephemerals...plants that shoot forth from bulbs they use to store the energy from early spring photosynthesis.  They leaf out on the forest floor before deciduous trees leaf out and cast heavy shade, after which the ramps drop their leaves.  Later in the year, when it's warmer for pollinators, they flower and then set seed.  I keep spreading the seeds and ramps are slowly walking across my acreage.  They taste wonderful.

20180503_080655.jpg
ramps around serviceberry
ramps around serviceberry
 
Robin Katz
pollinator
Posts: 138
Location: Idaho
67
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greg,

I tried ramps in Denver and the heat kicked their little allium butts. I think they will do better up here with less blazing sun. I had great luck with garlic chives and egyptian onions there and managed to keep some alive until I could plant them in the new kitchen garden.  

I love alliums in all their shapes and sizes so I'm hopeful ramps will do well here too. Love the pictures!
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robin Katz wrote: I love alliums in all their shapes and sizes so I'm hopeful ramps will do well here too. Love the pictures!



I've got my fingers crossed for you Robin!  I'm with you on Alliums.  I sometimes think I have too many....and then I add a bunch more.  Still several more species on my "to add" list.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robin Katz wrote:Wow Greg! I love the jungliness (not a word, I know) of your forest garden. We're just at the start of building our forest garden in our new place so this gives me some great inspiration.



Robin, I forgot to say thank you for your comments!  I used to argue with folks that we could have jungle like forest gardens up north, so I love you saying my forest garden is exhibiting jungliness….I agree, and more and more with every passing year.  I can't wait to see what it will look like in another 10, 20 or 30 years from now, if I make it that long .  
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A few pictures from my zone 5 citrus breeding experiment.  These are from an F2 Poncirus x Citrus bed where something like 95% died last winter, but you can see a few that died back to the soil, a few had top die back, and one in ~200 in this bed seems ok.  These pics were in the spring.  Since then those that didn't die back to the soil look really nice as they continue to grow.  We'll see what next spring brings.
20190613_080122.jpg
hardy citrus hybrid seedlings after overwintering without protection
hardy citrus hybrid seedlings after overwintering without protection
20190613_080142.jpg
hardy citrus hybrid seedlings after a Maine winter
hardy citrus hybrid seedlings after a Maine winter
20190613_080105.jpg
hardy citrus hybrid seedling after Maine winter
hardy citrus hybrid seedling after Maine winter
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's a groundcover of Houttuynia cordata and 'Dugereirhong Purple' garlic chive, a northern Chinese selection, growing between some fruit trees.  I got seeds for these garlic chives along with several other goodies from the extreme gardener (darn I miss her blog!) years ago through Seed Savers.  Every time I look at them/eat them I think happily of her posts.

This Houttuynia is the Japanese chemotype...it smells like oranges when you crush it.  A friend from NJ came by to pick up some figs I started for him.  We walked through the forest garden with a shovel to add to his haul.  When he saw the Houttuynia he mentioned to me that he has the Vietnamese/Chinese chemotype that smells like coriander and that he'd send me a plant!!! (very excited).  Does anyone have recommendations for how they use Houttuynia in the kitchen (either chemotype)?  I've found recipes for the coriander chemotype online but not for the orange chemotype yet.  Looking forward to playing with these flavors.  

Houttuynia is a great ground cover for shady conditions and makes a great "sea" in an "islands in the sea" ground cover style (the garlic chives being the islands in this planting).  It crawls all over to fill in the gaps and looks gorgeous doing it.

20190822_062842.jpg
Houttuynia cordata and 'Dugereirhong Purple' garlic chive
Houttuynia cordata and 'Dugereirhong Purple' garlic chive
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I planted seeds of Siberian purslane, Montia siberica, years ago on the wet shady edge of my forest garden that have since seeded themselves into the adjacent forest.  Siberian purslane leaves taste exactly like beet roots for all you that love beets like I do.  The poorly focused picture is mine, so I also attached a great picture of it in flower that I pulled off the web.

20190822_061345.jpg
Montia siberica
Montia siberica
 
Posts: 112
Location: belgium
14
fungi trees books
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wonderful. What a result.
On 20190817_101724.jpg I think its Chinese leek. Allium tuberosum.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

dirk maes wrote:Wonderful. What a result.
On 20190817_101724.jpg I think its Chinese leek. Allium tuberosum.



Dirk, thank you very much for your kind compliment as well as for your help with my Allium!

That Allium does have some traits in common with my A. tuberosum selections, such as the flat leaves of good culinary quality, but it differs in a few ways.  It blooms about a month earlier, has lilac colored flowers with a rounded umbrel, while my A.tuberosum umbrels are much flatter and white, though I think there are some varieties with purple flowers.  I need to work a little harder to identify it.  I'm kind of leaning towards A.senescens or a hybrid of it at the moment.  I bought it years ago from a nice woman at a farmers market who was growing it in her flower garden.  I'll take a closer look at them together tomorrow and taste them side by side to see how they compare.  Also, I want to see if it's forming seeds or if it seems to be sterile.  Next year I'll have to pay close attention to how the flower stalks open as well as try eating the flower shoots when they are young and tender to see how those compare to A.tuberosum.

One nice thing about this plant is that it is spreading nicely.  I'll have to move it to the base of the climbing rose on the other side of the arbor as well as a few more places to make sure it's safe.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been picking chicken of the woods (growing wild in the forest right near my house) and wine caps (cultivated in hardwood chips on a shady path in the forest garden) lately.  Chicken of the woods are great for beginning mushroom foragers as there's really nothing that looks quite like them.  And yes....they really do taste like chicken a decent amount and even develop a very chicken like texture.  Here are some pics of them:

chicken-of-the-woods-in-not-far-from-driveway.jpg
chicken of the woods
chicken of the woods
chicken-of-the-woods-sauted.jpg
sauted chicken of the woods
sauted chicken of the woods
chicken-of-the-woods-with-onions-and-spinach.jpg
onions, spinach and chicken of the woods
onions, spinach and chicken of the woods
 
Robin Katz
pollinator
Posts: 138
Location: Idaho
67
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greg, those are excellent looking mushrooms. Very pretty growing on the log. What type of tree was it? We have all conifers here so I'm looking for anything that might grow on them. I may inoculate with different types of mycelium just to see what happens (can't take the researcher out of me).

I'm especially envious since we're having our first snow of the season and it's a big one. Good thing we got in all the tomatoes and peppers from our first year proto-garden.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
An update on the American Spikenard.  It's such a big plant that makes sooo many berries.  Each little cluster ripens all at once, but the spike of berries ripen over an extended time.  They've passed now, but these are pictures from a few weeks ago when I was snacking on them.

American-Spikenard.jpg
american spikenard berries ripening
american spikenard berries ripening
American-Spikenard-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for American-Spikenard-2.jpg]
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robin Katz wrote:Greg, those are excellent looking mushrooms. Very pretty growing on the log. What type of tree was it? We have all conifers here so I'm looking for anything that might grow on them. I may inoculate with different types of mycelium just to see what happens (can't take the researcher out of me).

I'm especially envious since we're having our first snow of the season and it's a big one. Good thing we got in all the tomatoes and peppers from our first year proto-garden.



Robin, you probably don't want to know it's 77F here then  (was in the 80's for 4 days a week ago....our season has dramatically extended due to the warming in this area....Maine has seen some of the greatest warming on Earth....mixed feelings).

It's growing on a hardwood tree, sorry to say.  I can't recall for sure, but I think it's oak (it's lost it's bark so I'm not good enough to ID that).

I've read that chicken of the woods can grow on conifers here, but that those have caused poisonings and might actually be a different, but related species.  But here's some info from Fungi Perfecti that differs on that....might be a different strain?


SOFTWOOD

Douglas Fir: Chicken of the Woods,

Fir: Phoenix Oyster, Turkey Tail.

Pinon Pine: Phoenix Oyster, Turkey Tail.

Spruce: Chicken of the Woods, Phoenix Oyster, Turkey Tail.

Source: Fungi Perfecti Catalog.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The German fig that overwintered outside for me this past winter is ripening it's breba crop right now.  

German-fig-that-overwintered-outside.jpg
german fig ripened breba crop
german fig ripened breba crop
 
Robin Katz
pollinator
Posts: 138
Location: Idaho
67
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Greg for the info from Fungi Perfecti. On the weather being warm there, I think I'd have mixed feelings too - love the weather but wonder what it's doing to the ecosystem.
 
Posts: 11
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:Not far from those paw paws is an old German fig I bought off an older collector that had to reduce the size of his collection.  It's in a pot that got stranded late last fall out in that section of garden with about 20 others.  They hadn't gone dormant yet due to a hot weird fall and then a sudden freeze and heavy snow hit.  I laid them down on the ground and threw two tarps over them, which was all they got for winter protection, which is no where near enough for most figs.  16 died, 6 partially died, but have rebounded, and this one from Germany had no damage!!!  Not even to the dormant fig buds which then pushed these figs out for me.  More cold hardiness testing to follow.


Hi, as a fellow Mainiac I would love to trade some fig cuttings from that German fig for something you might need/desire. Just a thought. I'm  in central Maine most of the time but escape the worst of the snow in N. C.

 
pollinator
Posts: 489
290
solar wood heat
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:....I got excited because for the first time I have paw paw fruits developing!  I took some pictures and thought I'd share.  I posted some monarch butterfly pictures I took on my milkweed crop here, so I'll skip reposting those.  So first my cute little paw paw fruits.



how many ways do you know how to prepare paw paw fruits???  I'm asking cause paw paw trees are native to the US and can be grown almost any where in the US....so if you've eaten and prepared them to your satisfaction, please let me know ....in return, I'll tell you how I prepared honey locust beans


and by the way, your food forest loves you man!
 
gardener
Posts: 3057
280
forest garden fungi trees books food preservation bike
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Greg,
I absolutely love your forest garden. I am astonished at how similar it is to mine.  Well, I guess we both live in cool, wet, out of the way states and pretty close to a Portland.  Yours is the original.
We grow almost all of the same things.
As well as the biochar that we've both known about for a long time.
I am so happy to see you consuming many alliums. Great easy low effort vegies.  A great natural way to prevent cancer.  Flavor your food up in a healthy way without salt or unhealthy processed ingredients.  Great in marinades!
For houtuynnia cordata, I use it in the following way: it is quite strong flavored, so I make a tea out of it, which I think is quite good.  Then I use the greens afterwards like any other green leafy: with beans, in pasta, with rice, in a wrap like sushi, or a taco, in a sandwich, or in a soup or casserole. Did you know that houtuynnia cordata is one of the most esteemed anti-virals of herbalists like Stephen Harrod Buhner?   The Japanese drink houtuynnia cordata tea as a detox drink.   I believe that I have the vietnamese variety. I grow it in a raised bed due to its invasive nature.
John S
PDX OR
 
Posts: 117
10
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greg I would love if you posted full planting list of our forest garden, I live in a very similar climate (zone 5 Ontario) and would love to "steal" some of your varieties that have worked.

I had no idea spikenard had such intersting berries! Always thought they were just an asparagus replacement.

PS your groundcover is indeed bungleweed, its all over our property as well. nice purple blue columnar flowers.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

rick jacobson wrote: Hi, as a fellow Mainiac I would love to trade some fig cuttings from that German fig for something you might need/desire. Just a thought. I'm  in central Maine most of the time but escape the worst of the snow in N. C.



Hello fellow Mainiac Rick!  My collection is difficult to access right now as it's tucked away for the winter, but in the spring when I do the fig shuffle I should be able to find it and see if I can sneak a cutting off (though it's fairly small and I need to reproduce it a little to make backups for experiments here).  Drop me a reminder in the spring and I'll let you know if I can do it then or if we might need to wait until the fall for more growth.  
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Orin Raichart wrote: how many ways do you know how to prepare paw paw fruits???  I'm asking cause paw paw trees are native to the US and can be grown almost any where in the US....so if you've eaten and prepared them to your satisfaction, please let me know ....in return, I'll tell you how I prepared honey locust beans


and by the way, your food forest loves you man!



Thank you Orin!  This year was my first year with pawpaw fruit from just one of my trees and since there were only 9 I ate them all fresh, sharing them with all willing tasters so more folks could get the experience.  I can't wait to try the recipes from Michael Judd's book next year when I hopefully have more fruit coming from more pawpaw varieties.  Perhaps next fall I can provide an update with pictures of some pawpaw creations.  
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John Suavecito wrote:Hi Greg,
I absolutely love your forest garden. I am astonished at how similar it is to mine.  Well, I guess we both live in cool, wet, out of the way states and pretty close to a Portland.  Yours is the original.
We grow almost all of the same things.
As well as the biochar that we've both known about for a long time.
I am so happy to see you consuming many alliums. Great easy low effort vegies.  A great natural way to prevent cancer.  Flavor your food up in a healthy way without salt or unhealthy processed ingredients.  Great in marinades!
For houtuynnia cordata, I use it in the following way: it is quite strong flavored, so I make a tea out of it, which I think is quite good.  Then I use the greens afterwards like any other green leafy: with beans, in pasta, with rice, in a wrap like sushi, or a taco, in a sandwich, or in a soup or casserole. Did you know that houtuynnia cordata is one of the most esteemed anti-virals of herbalists like Stephen Harrod Buhner?   The Japanese drink houtuynnia cordata tea as a detox drink.   I believe that I have the vietnamese variety. I grow it in a raised bed due to its invasive nature.
John S
PDX OR



Visiting your Portland is definitely on my list of places to check out John.  I love that we have similar forest gardens, biochar and all.  There's biochar under my whole garden and starting to spread outward into my native forest from there to take advantage of the higher growth rates it fosters.  

For alliums this year I'm hoping to add A. victorialis, cernuum (pink and white) and moly.  Hopefully they all germinate well.  

Thank you so much for the description of how you use your houttuynia!  I can't wait to try all the ways you've listed.  
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

C. West wrote:Greg I would love if you posted full planting list of our forest garden, I live in a very similar climate (zone 5 Ontario) and would love to "steal" some of your varieties that have worked.

I had no idea spikenard had such intersting berries! Always thought they were just an asparagus replacement.

PS your groundcover is indeed bungleweed, its all over our property as well. nice purple blue columnar flowers.



I will do some searching for my planting plans and pull together a list C.  Thank you for the positive ID on the bugleweed.
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 10
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here's what the forest garden looks like this time of year :)


I like the quietness of the season, but I'm looking forward to harvesting again in the spring.
 
rick jacobson
Posts: 11
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:

rick jacobson wrote: Hi, as a fellow Mainiac I would love to trade some fig cuttings from that German fig for something you might need/desire. Just a thought. I'm  in central Maine most of the time but escape the worst of the snow in N. C.



Hello fellow Mainiac Rick!  My collection is difficult to access right now as it's tucked away for the winter, but in the spring when I do the fig shuffle I should be able to find it and see if I can sneak a cutting off (though it's fairly small and I need to reproduce it a little to make backups for experiments here).  Drop me a reminder in the spring and I'll let you know if I can do it then or if we might need to wait until the fall for more growth.  

Thanks for that, I am perfectly happy to wait until it's spring or fall to get a cutting. That plant must have some good genes to survive a Maine winter. Will try to connect this spring , thanks again
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Greg, total newbie here. Just bought 1/2 acre in Westbrook, ME with my husband. We are learning about permiculture and how to grow cold-hardy plants. I'd be very interested in your planting list, too and where to source the plants. Thank you for the photos and the information!
 
Posts: 618
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
57
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
nice food forest! in about 4-5 yrs. behind you and still adding stuff. put in over 40 varieties of fruit ,nuts , medicinals and edible ground covers. wish i could do pawpaws and peaches but too cold here in the st. john valley. put in 2 mulberries last spring that are hardy here.  i have everything in rows 15ft apart. the whole rows are mulched with  fresh wood chips every spring. only needs minimal mowing in between the rows. i have many of the same plants  as you do and  they are still filling in. you have any of the romance series of cherries? they grow very well here with no care. should see a few cherries next summer. also have a polish morello and montmorency cherry. once all my plants have started to produce, i shouldn't have to buy anymore fruit or nuts. my chics , comfrey and compost worms give me all the fertilizer i need for the plants. once the rows all fill in and the trees and bushes get bigger, it will be like a tunnel walking down the rows. have arctic raspberries and wild and alpine strawberries as well as various herbs as ground covers starting to fill in. if i get down your way I'm going to have to drop in to see your place in person. ill post some pics of mine next summer.
 
Posts: 66
Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
35
hugelkultur purity forest garden
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm trying to convert my backyard into its own food forest on the low down without the HOA knowing. My place is like a mullet, business up front and party in the back.

Gotta keep that HOA in the dark and my nose clean
 
steve bossie
Posts: 618
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
57
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
nice thing about being in the country. no one cares what your yard looks like.
 
Sara Rosenberg
Posts: 66
Location: Fort Worth, TX 76179
35
hugelkultur purity forest garden
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Steve, I wish I was in the country but budget, work, and our child's school keeps me close to the downtown area. I thought I was doing good getting a 1/4 acre in an HOA. I do dream of 2+ acres without an HOA and less rocky soil.

It takes me a full day to dig holes for blackberry starts because of the limestone deposits. there is an old abandoned limestone quarry ~1 mile away.
 
steve bossie
Posts: 618
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
57
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Sara Rosenberg wrote:Steve, I wish I was in the country but budget, work, and our child's school keeps me close to the downtown area. I thought I was doing good getting a 1/4 acre in an HOA. I do dream of 2+ acres without an HOA and less rocky soil.

It takes me a full day to dig holes for blackberry starts because of the limestone deposits. there is an old abandoned limestone quarry ~1 mile away.

i was lucky to be born and raised in the country.
yes we didn't have much growing up here but it taught us how to make due with what we had. we grew big gardens because we had to. my father was a excellent teacher but it wasn't all fun and games. growing , harvesting , canning, freezing, foraging , hunting and fishing were all necessities to survive. many have never experienced this in todays day and age. i didn't embrace the premaculture aspect until about 10 yrs ago.
 
Posts: 40
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
15
forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:And an ornamental onion with great tasting foliage that grows at the base of my rose arbor....not sure, I think it might be an A. nutans.  Anyone know?  I'll have to look it up.  The flowers are a little more purple in person than they are showing in this pic.



Hey Greg, wondering if you ever got that allium ID'd. I think I had the same plant (although darker flowers, very similar leaves) in Vermont many years ago. It was very hardy in zone 4, robust enough to divide every few years and share around. Never had a name for it though. Never saw seeds on it either.
 
Erik van Lennep
Posts: 40
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
15
forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:

dirk maes wrote:Wonderful. What a result.
On 20190817_101724.jpg I think its Chinese leek. Allium tuberosum.



Dirk, thank you very much for your kind compliment as well as for your help with my Allium!

That Allium does have some traits in common with my A. tuberosum selections, such as the flat leaves of good culinary quality, but it differs in a few ways.  It blooms about a month earlier, has lilac colored flowers with a rounded umbrel, while my A.tuberosum umbrels are much flatter and white, though I think there are some varieties with purple flowers.  I need to work a little harder to identify it.  I'm kind of leaning towards A.senescens or a hybrid of it at the moment.  I bought it years ago from a nice woman at a farmers market who was growing it in her flower garden.  I'll take a closer look at them together tomorrow and taste them side by side to see how they compare.  Also, I want to see if it's forming seeds or if it seems to be sterile.  Next year I'll have to pay close attention to how the flower stalks open as well as try eating the flower shoots when they are young and tender to see how those compare to A.tuberosum.

One nice thing about this plant is that it is spreading nicely.  I'll have to move it to the base of the climbing rose on the other side of the arbor as well as a few more places to make sure it's safe.



I've grown both A. tuberosum and A. senescens and it's neither of those. Mystery continues----
 
Erik van Lennep
Posts: 40
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
15
forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:I've been picking chicken of the woods (growing wild in the forest right near my house) and wine caps (cultivated in hardwood chips on a shady path in the forest garden) lately.  Chicken of the woods are great for beginning mushroom foragers as there's really nothing that looks quite like them.  And yes....they really do taste like chicken a decent amount and even develop a very chicken like texture.  Here are some pics of them:



Chicken of the Woods is an all-time fave of mine too. I recently moved from Barcelona Spain to Maastricht in the Netherlands. Bad time for a horti-botano-permie guy; left sunny days in the 80's and arrived to constant clouds, shorter days and temps hovering in the low 40sF. But my first walk in the suburbs edging on farm fields where I moved gifted me with MASSES of Chicken of the Woods on an aging cherry tree beside a bike path.
chicken-of-the-woods.jpeg
Chicken of the woods
Chicken of the woods
 
Erik van Lennep
Posts: 40
Location: Maastricht, The Netherlands
15
forest garden fungi trees
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Greg Martin wrote:And an ornamental onion with great tasting foliage that grows at the base of my rose arbor....not sure, I think it might be an A. nutans.  Anyone know?  I'll have to look it up.  The flowers are a little more purple in person than they are showing in this pic.



I think I might have just stumbled on the ID for this. Ona UK perennial veggie site: https://www.incrediblevegetables.co.uk/whats-growing/
"Norrlands Onion"; Allium nutans X angulosum (aka 'Mouse Garlic'). It's a sterile hybrid.

"Norrlands Onion
This attractive and tasty allium came to us from Stephen Barstow. It is slow growing and clump forming so can be divided up. According to Stephen it was found in a few old gardens in Northern Sweden, being grown as an ornamental, hence the name. It is a sterile hybrid between Allium nutans and A. angulosum".

What do you think?
Norrlands-onion.jpg
[Thumbnail for Norrlands-onion.jpg]
 
Greg Martin
gardener
Posts: 1970
Location: Maine, zone 5
854
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Erik, that sure does look like a great candidate and A. nutans X angulosum seems like a set of very likely parents.  This summer I'll pay close attention.  Thank you!
 
pollinator
Posts: 151
10
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Greg, was wondering if you ever offer tours of your Forest Garden.

Ed
gift
 
Common Weeds And Wild Edibles Of The World (HD video)
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic