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Good long-distance wheelbarrow/cart?

 
pollinator
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Jan Coriveau you beat me to it. Those carts are TOUGH! I've pulled over 300 lbs of chicken feed in it and had no problems.
 
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Trace Oswald wrote:I bought this Gorilla cart for my lady, and we both really like it.  Much more stable than a wheelbarrow, holds more, and it is much easier to pull a load for a longer distance than to push it.  We use it for everything, including moving heavy loads of rocks.  With a heavy load of rock, if you are going uphill, you may have to use one person to push and one to pull, but short of that, we find it much easier to use than a wheelbarrow, and it fits through smaller spaces.  The sides come off easily for flat loads
that won't fit in the cart with the sides on.
Gorilla cart on Amazon


After reading this thread, back when it first appeared, I bought one of these. My thought was that chances are, with the hills we have here, I probably wouldn't be physically able to pull much more than its capacity, anyway. Hubs raised his brow, in doubt - until it came, I assembled and started using it. Now, we need a second one! It's been used for hauling a deer feeder, water, hay, straw, feed bags, a deer, fencing supplies, (including posts & the fence!), tools, hardware, groceries, pavers, cinder blocks, rocks, pallets, cement bags, sand, firewood, weeds, and mineral blocks. Hubs wants one of his own, now. Oh - and I've discovered it can easily manage a far heavier load than I can!
 
Posts: 33
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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I hope this is acceptable within the rules to post this, if not, please just delete it. Since I gave a great review in this thread of the 1200 Lbs Gorilla Dump Cart recently and mentioned that it can go on sale for a better price on slickdeals.net, I thought I'd let people know that it's currently on sale at amazon... I paid less than that when I got mine, but I haven't seen it at those prices ever since (If memory is good, it was around 86$). Just to be clear, I have no association to slickdeals or anyone that could benefit from this sale... I'm just a homesteader that really enjoy using that cart and would never consider a wheelbarrow after trying this cart... I hope this helps someone

https://slickdeals.net/f/13732073-gorilla-garden-dump-cart-1200-lb-capacity-94-free-shipping

Happy holidays to everyone !!!
 
Jan Corriveau
Posts: 33
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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Well, I should have looked at my emails fully this morning before posting the deal above... I had another email from my alerts at slickdeals for an even better deal. Around the price I paid...

https://slickdeals.net/f/13730798-85-77-gorilla-carts-gor6ps-heavy-duty-poly-yard-dump-cart-with-2-in-1-convertible-handle-1-200-pound-capacity-black
 
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Well, in the past 12 years, we are on our 4th gorilla cart.  Not because we love them, but because there isn't anything else really affordable out there.

Pros
- Price
- handle does swivel to mount on a lawn tractor.

Cons
- Will not haul the rated load.  Contacted manufacture and it's based on evenly place weight for all 4 wheels in a stationary fashion.
- Wheels at times last 4 weeks or 4 months, never over 1-1/2 years.  Tubes rot out on the inside or treads split.  
- The side pins fall off too often that retain the side rails.  Always buying extra at Lowes till someone said, just use zip-ties they are cheaper.
- The steering pin from the handle to the front axle shears or the retaining clips falls and is good as lost.
- The frame will rust out.
- Wheel bearings will rust out in under 1-year if used in the rain or stored outdoors.
- Plastic mat rips too easy, we just toss it out and replace with a front door welcome mat.
- If wheels held by a nut, replace with nylock nuts.  Nut will rust and seize or just fall off and lost.
- If wheels held on by split cotter pin check often if pin breaks to become lost.

I've replaced wheels with brand name tires from brand stores.  They don't last much longer.  Gave up, and just use a coupon from Harbor Freight when on sale.

Finally building my own REAL trailer cart for lawn and garden from a real trailer frame.  Want something to last like my grandparents once had.  Even after this virus becomes long gone, the trailer will still be around.  BUT, in the mean time, all I got are 2 gorilla carts.  One on it's almost last leg and the newer one just starting to rust.  
 
Jan Corriveau
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Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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Hello Brian,

That's really an unfortunate experience you had with your gorilla carts you have... I can't help but to think that you must have a different model than the one I mentioned in my posts above... I saw many users posted different gorilla cart models. I would not want to load them to full max rating (1200 Lbs) as like you said, I doubt they could handle that for long and they must have tested this in a non realistic environment. The model I have, apart from adding air to the tires has not given me any problem (My tires have a tube, so even cracking on the tire wouldn't hurt if it happened). I have it and used it extensively for the last 4-5 years. I actually bought a second one when I originally posted the sale at the time.

If it's made with some metal, you definitely can expect rust on those parts after some years (my climate is on the fairly dry side). I use it mostly for mulch, so not the heaviest out there, but this weekend, I was using it to load some grass sod with super dense and heavy clay soil. I used it also loaded with rocks and other heavy materials with no problem. The gorilla cart loaded as high as I could manage was so heavy that it took a bit of effort to start moving it on a slightly sloped ground, but it handled it really easy. The way I see it, with the model I have, there's no way I could ever even load the max (1200lbs) and then be able to move it. It's just too much weight.

This is the one I have:
https://www.amazon.com/Gorilla-Carts-GOR6PS-Heavy-Duty-Convertible/dp/B01BECQF6K

There are a few bad reviews, so I guess sometimes you can get one with a tire problem out of the box, but overall, people seem to like it quite a bit. Btw, I did lose the pin on the handle once at the beginning, but never happened again...

Anyways, just thought I'd post this in case the model I have can get you to have a better experience. I'm also like you, I like to build things heavy duty so they last like a tank, I just wonder if someone could make one of those that is not too heavy with much thicker gauge metal. This is the reason why they use a really thick plastic cart to save on weight.

All the best

Jan
 
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We have three different gorilla carts, a small one, a bigger dump one, and a metal one with sides that are removable, and I love them, but my husband has had to weld a couple times already and reinforce them for our bumpy road, to be pulled by the ATV when it is loaded.  I would like it better if there was more reinforcement around the pin that holds the front wheels and the towing handle, because everything pulls, pushes and bumps in that one spot and that's where the bigger of the two welds was as a result.
 
Brian Maverick
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Norma Guy wrote:We have three different gorilla carts, a small one, a bigger dump one, and a metal one with sides that are removable, and I love them, but my husband has had to weld a couple times already and reinforce them for our bumpy road, to be pulled by the ATV when it is loaded.  I would like it better if there was more reinforcement around the pin that holds the front wheels and the towing handle, because everything pulls, pushes and bumps in that one spot and that's where the bigger of the two welds was as a result.



Yes, the metal versions tend to hold up alright for a year or two.  Then it's repairs.  

80% of the time these are pulled by hand.  20% of the time with a compact tractor going slow as these can get bouncy and rock.  

My neighbor took a Harbor-Freight small trailer frame kit and built his cart.  He does really well with it with the Polaris ATV.
H-F-Trailer.JPG
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H-F-trailer-all-assembled-with-added-wood..jpeg
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gardener
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I imagine, like most people here, I have a variety of carts, wheel barrows, etc.  Large and small Vermont Cart, large and small wheel barrow,  wagon with removable sides, and a dump trailer  that tows behind a mower. This does not seem to be a one size fits all situation.  Each does a specific function better than the others.
 
Brian Maverick
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John F Dean wrote:I imagine, like most people here, I have a variety of carts, wheel barrows, etc.  Large and small Vermont Cart, large and small wheel barrow,  wagon with removable sides, and a dump trailer  that tows behind a mower. This does not seem to be a one size fits all situation.  Each does a specific function better than the others.



Yes yes yes.

For a hand cart, there isn't much out there being durable, dependable and above all else long lasting.  

The old carts of the 60s, 70s and 80s are still going strong from Craftsman, Monkeywards, and the like.  solid metal, primered and thick paint.   Today, most manufactures forgo the primer.

I love looking at Cl and seeing old farm equipment from the turn of the century years of the 1900s.  Most of the time it's just surface rust all about.  Easy to remove.  However, with steel today, it's so thin, removing the rust would make holes.
 
John F Dean
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Hi Brian,

Yes, I have a pick-up truck made from heavy duty aluminum  foil.
 
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Well.  I have several of the mentioned carts.  A 4 wheeled garden cart, the cart with a dump bed, and others....
They all have some advantages, but one of my biggest problems is picking up heavy stuff to get them into the cart!
So, for Mothers' Day, I gifted myself with this:   https://www.worx.com/lawn-garden/yard-carts-wheelbarrows/aerocart-wheelbarrow-yard-cart-wg050.html

It looks like it uses leverage points well, and comes with several accessories to assist with picking up and moving heavy awkward items.  
They are having sales right now!  
I can't give an opinion, since I haven't used it.

BTW, this is a handy/dandy little disc:  https://www.amleo.com/leonard-gardenglide-transporter/p/AG1/

I got it to drag behind the golf cart, but I transport a lot of stuff by hand, and it seems to be well made.  AM Leonard also makes some handles to convert wagons to tow behinds.

 
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Richard Lemons wrote:I use one similar to the Strongway Garden Cart.  Very easy to push, even when loaded.


Oh wow!  I used to have one of those and I absolutely loved it!  After about 15 years of hard daily use it finally fell apart.  I've used a bunch of different cart/wheelbarrows since then but none better for horse manure than the Strongway type. How did I ever forget about it?  
 
Brian Maverick
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Paula Broadfoot wrote:Well.  I have several of the mentioned carts.  A 4 wheeled garden cart, the cart with a dump bed, and others....
They all have some advantages, but one of my biggest problems is picking up heavy stuff to get them into the cart!
So, for Mothers' Day, I gifted myself with this:   https://www.worx.com/lawn-garden/yard-carts-wheelbarrows/aerocart-wheelbarrow-yard-cart-wg050.html

It looks like it uses leverage points well, and comes with several accessories to assist with picking up and moving heavy awkward items.  
They are having sales right now!  
I can't give an opinion, since I haven't used it.



Now that is something useful.  Wonder if I can fab something together with the ACE Hardware wheelbarrows I got and the all steel hand carts around the garage.   Otherwise, a nice labor saving device as a combination tool.   This has me thinking.  Thanks much!
 
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I once had to haul a bunch of stuff several miles in a wheelbarrow over a trail that was in mostly good shape.  Going in was ok, but I found I had to haul a much bigger load out than I had expected.  I rigged a rope from handle to handle going over my shoulders so my hands were only needed for guiding and controlling (mainly in rough spots or changes of direction).  I used some extra clothes for padding between shoulders and rope.  It was just an adhoc solution but it made using the wheelbarrow much easier.
 
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If you want quality it’s not cheap. But here’s what works for me, though obviously it’s a step above ‘wheelbarrow’! However, for a multipurpose cart it’s awesome. You can also buy just the frame and fabricate your own box or flatbed. Mine is hinged to dump.
Cabelas is just one (overpriced) example.
https://www.cabelas.com/product/BOSSKI-ATV-TRAILERS/1786354.uts?productVariantId=3803633&WT.tsrc=PPC&WT.mc_id=GoogleProductAds&WT.z_mc_id1=03846874&rid=20&ds_rl=1246549&ds_rl=1246552&ds_rl=1252242&ds_rl=1252079&gclid=CjwKCAjw7-P1BRA2EiwAXoPWAx7ytKc77Ck6z42_SvWCouJJ-rdHhpZA3_DrXu_vLPSPugGNRszvmBoCnJYQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
6133A8AC-BFC0-4835-BE4A-D2FB6098E7B1.jpeg
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C5, who goes by Ross Raven around here, just dumped another batch of cart photos from his latest trip to Central America.

https://darkgreenmountainsurvivalresearchcentre.wordpress.com/2020/04/30/planet-of-the-human-powered-wagon-survival-advice-from-central-america-part-ii/
 
Jeremy VanGelder
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I should add that the flat-free wheelbarrow tires you can now buy have really saved our bacon. We have them on the cart we pull behind our lawn tractor, as well as most of our wheelbarrows. We recently got a second garden tractor, so I plan to fix up an old cart with these tires to pull behind it.

https://harborfreight.com/16-inch-flat-free-wheelbarrow-tire-95679.html
 
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Jeremy VanGelder wrote:I should add that the flat-free wheelbarrow tires you can now buy have really saved our bacon. We have them on the cart we pull behind our lawn tractor, as well as most of our wheelbarrows. We recently got a second garden tractor, so I plan to fix up an old cart with these tires to pull behind it.

We call them "always flat" and got rid of same - I'm not very strong and we have a lot of steep spots with bumps so the increased effort to push compared to an air tire wasn't worth it. What we *have* done is replace them with tires with a flatter profile so the pressure is more widely distributed - the first time because we had one we could salvage, the second time intentionally. We've got Himalayan Blackberry thorns to deal with. I have heard of people adding a liner between the tire and inner tube of salvaged carpet material to help decrease punctures, but a wheelbarrow tire is a bit small for that treatment.
 
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You can use an old wheelbarrow tire or tube as a liner in the new wheelbarrow tire.  Trim the bead and CAREFULLY cut across it--chamfer the ends so it will slide over itself and not pinch the tube (if that makes any sense).

I always put the biggest tire I can on a wheelbarrow.  
 
Julie Reed
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Jay Angler wrote:
I'm not very strong and we have a lot of steep spots with bumps so the increased effort to push compared to an air tire wasn't worth it. What we *have* done is replace them with tires with a flatter profile so the pressure is more widely distributed        



I’m not sure I understand how that helps. A flatter profile tire creates more rolling resistance and also is harder to push. It does create less impact on the ground, so doesn’t sink into soft terrain as easily, if that’s what you meant?
As far as punctures, the pale green liquid called Slime works fairly well. You put a few ounces in the tire through the valve stem, and it stays liquid, coating the entire inside as the wheel rotates. When a puncture happens, the liquid starts to ooze out and solidifies, sealing the leak. There’s also a ‘new and improved’ version that has fibers in it, which supposedly works even better (the way platelets help blood clot).
 
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Does anyone have experience with comparing a gorilla cart with a two-wheeled wheelbarrow? I find the latter to be so much better than a single wheeler that it is not really a comparison. The single wheel’s only benefit is on very narrow pathways, which I avoid designing now anyhow. The two wheeler needs only one hand to move most loads, doesn’t require arm exertion for stability, can be pushed or pulled, and turns on a dime. The main benefits I see to a gorilla cart are the flat surface for moving plants or buckets of liquids, and the potential attachment to a tractor or atv. However the big one weighs 87lbs! Am I wrong for thinking unless you plan to tow it the gorilla cart is a heavy, costly redundancy to a two wheeled barrow?
 
Jay Angler
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Julie Reed wrote:

Jay Angler wrote:
I'm not very strong and we have a lot of steep spots with bumps so the increased effort to push compared to an air tire wasn't worth it. What we *have* done is replace them with tires with a flatter profile so the pressure is more widely distributed        



I’m not sure I understand how that helps. A flatter profile tire creates more rolling resistance and also is harder to push. It does create less impact on the ground, so doesn’t sink into soft terrain as easily, if that’s what you meant?

I discussed this with Hubby and he basically said that it was more that the substitute tire is from a small road-legal trailer, so the tire is actually built stronger and is about double the weight. I just knew that since he replaced the worn "wheel-barrow tire" with the "trailer tire", I haven't had a puncture, which happens a lot around our farm due to Himalayan Blackberry. It's important to still just inflate to wheel-barrow pressure - 20 psi or so even though trailer tires are rated for more, because the hub isn't designed for the higher pressure.
 
Julie Reed
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True, a highway rated trailer tire is better than a typical wheelbarrow tire, as far as puncture resistance, since it it a belted tire, not just rubber. You can inflate it more than 20 psi to help it roll better, the hub can easily handle the additional air pressure. I have even put 40 psi in wheelbarrow and yard cart tires rated for 20. It take a LOT to blow a tire off the rim, but the tire is always going to be the weak link, not the hub/rim.
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