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Growing Blueberries Naturally with No Irrigation and No Pruning

 
pollinator
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I’m trying to find some Blue Ridge blueberries, Vaccinium Pallidum. They sound like they  prefer much dryer sites than most. The only Nursery that I’ve found selling them has terrible reviews.

Oikos Tree Crops sells seeds for a blueberry that likes dryer sites.
 
garden master
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Here's a video I made about why I don't prune my blueberries. The more fruit buds you keep, the more blueberries you will have!



The more you prune, the less blueberries you will have, so why prune?

It also saves a lot of work!

Some people say that you have to prune to get big or healthy fruit, but that hasn't been the case for me. As long as the bush is in healthy soil with access to lots of moisture, it will produce tons of healthy blueberries of good size!

It's also really common for people to say to prune for shape, but blueberries and other plants will self prune in shaded areas, and focus more growth on sunny areas.

I may prune if the limb is already completely dead or if it has been badly damaged like being torn from a deer bite. Other than something like that, I let the bush grow like it wants to, and even this very minimal pruning doesn't need to be done most of time. The dead limb will fall off naturally and heal over, and most of the time a damaged wound will also heal fine, with the branch dying back to a live bud and the damaged part will fall off. Sometimes a damaged limb may not heal back ideally by itself if it is very jagged or peeled off, but it can be cut back to a healthy part of the limb with a clean cut so it can heal easier.
 
pollinator
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Steve Thorn wrote:Here's a video I made about why I don't prune my blueberries. The more fruit buds you keep, the more blueberries you will have!



This is very helpful, Steve. Thanks for posting. And I was delighted you pointed out the Preying Mantis egg sac. I'm just learning about these, and I kept wondering if that's what I was seeing; then you confirmed it!

 
Steve Thorn
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Thanks Diane!

Yeah I feel like I've found hidden treasure when I find praying mantis eggs!
 
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I don't prune my blueberry bushes. I only trim off limbs to root cuttings. I save my used coffee grounds & tea bags and sprinkle that around the base of the bush. I also sprinkle crumbled eggs shells.
 
Steve Thorn
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The blueberries are already starting to bloom. This picture below was from a few days ago near the end of January and is the earliest I think I've ever seen them start to bloom. It should be interesting to see how they do this year. The blueberry blooms have seemed very tough before, so I think they will probably be fine.
20200130_035943.jpg
First blueberry flower of the year in January
First blueberry flower of the year in January
 
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I thought this looked interesting  https://oikostreecrops.com/products/seeds-ecos/fruit-nut-seeds/dryland-blueberry-seed/ .  Oikos claims it grows in dry conditions/ non acidic conditions.  I haven't tried to grow this, but I would like to no if anyone has.
 
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