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Growing Apple Trees from Seed Naturally

 
pollinator
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Justin Gerardot wrote:This podcast about wild apple trees is informative and entertaining.
[url=https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/046]Scrump! Your Guide to Foraging Wild Apples

[/url]

This podcast covers domestication of apples, Johnny appleseed,  getting yeast from apples, foraging wild apples, and more. An apple tree grown from seed, whether planted by humans or wildlife, is known as a pippin.




That link didn't seem to work but I found it, I think.  

https://www.wild-fed.com/podcast/046
 
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Thank you Michael. I have tried a couple times to edit the url. It shows up in preview mode, but not when I post it. Maybe it's because I'm trying to use desktop mode on my phone?
 
Michael Helmersson
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Justin Gerardot wrote:Thank you Michael. I have tried a couple times to edit the url. It shows up in preview mode, but not when I post it. Maybe it's because I'm trying to use desktop mode on my phone?



No, it did something weird for me too. I just pasted the link in the message and somehow it showed up functional.
 
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Looks like a neat podcast, excited to check it out!
 
Steve Thorn
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Wendy Boardman wrote:Just had to share my apple growing with everyone. It's one of my favorite seeds to sprout. Whenever our grandsons finish one of their favorite apples they give me the seeds to plant.



That seedling looks great Wendy, thanks for sharing!
 
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Steve Thorn wrote:Have you wanted to try growing apple trees from seed and create your own new variety?

Then let's grow some apple trees together!

So why grow apples from seed when there are numerous good existing varieties?

Most of the modern apples aren't adapted to my particular climate and also aren't resistant to our local pests and diseases here.

Growing apple trees from seed creates the possibility to create totally new types of apples that are more vigorous growers in your climate, more resistant to pests, and match your specific taste preferences!

If you'd like to stay up to date with the latest videos, you can subscribe to my Youtube channel HERE by clicking the red subscribe button and click the bell to get email notifications for each new video! I'd love to have you join me for this journey!



I particularly like the idea of jumbling up Apple varieties over multiple different generations. If you mix a Gala Apple with a HoneyCrisp, for example, you just have a mix of a HoneyCrisp and a Gala apple. Possibly not the only apple of its kind in the world, and not something difficult to recreate. You'd probably get similar apples every time you did that cross. But if you take that Apple, cross it with another mix, keep doing that for 2 or 3 generations then the results should be very random and unpredictable, depending what genes happened to get passed down. All sorts of sizes, flavors, textures, colors. And by the 3rd generation every single Apple seed would be a unique new Apple variety.

This would be a long term project with natural breeding and growing techniques, 3 generations would take at least 12 to 15 years.

However, it wouldn't have to take that long. If you really wanted to skip some of the "natural growing" and speed up the breeding, grafting and grow lights could allow a new generation every 2 years. I've started apples under grow lights before and can state from experience that it's very feasible to go from seed to 8 inch sapling in a few months. Add another 2 months cold stratification, and that seed you harvested in fall is now scion wood for grafting in early springtime. When grafted onto a mature tree, it would be flowering and fruiting only 2 years after you first harvested the seed.

 
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Just a quick note everyone. I had found the most amazing 'treasure' a few days ago. My grandsons had just finished eating Pink Lady apples. They brought me the cores. So I cut them open and found this!
IMG_20210511_144515_hdr.jpg
Apple seed sprouting
IMG_20210511_144345_hdr.jpg
Pink lady apple seed sprouting
 
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I have volunteer apple seedlings growing in the garden area. They are very early to emerge in March and went through snow storms unharmed. But again I found orange spots on the lower leaves. Newer ones are fine. I am letting the seedlings grow and see how it goes.
P1130641.JPG
Apple seedling with cedar rust infection
Apple seedling with cedar rust infection
 
Michael Helmersson
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Wendy Boardman wrote:Just a quick note everyone. I had found the most amazing 'treasure' a few days ago. My grandsons had just finished eating Pink Lady apples. They brought me the cores. So I cut them open and found this!



Imagine standing under an apple tree that came from a seed in an apple you had eaten, and gave to your grandmother. I can't come up with the words for how profound that would feel.
 
Steve Thorn
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Wendy Boardman wrote:Just a quick note everyone. I had found the most amazing 'treasure' a few days ago. My grandsons had just finished eating Pink Lady apples. They brought me the cores. So I cut them open and found this!



That's really neat Wendy, looking good!
 
Steve Thorn
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May Lotito wrote:I have volunteer apple seedlings growing in the garden area. They are very early to emerge in March and went through snow storms unharmed. But again I found orange spots on the lower leaves. Newer ones are fine. I am letting the seedlings grow and see how it goes.



My young apple seedlings had similar spots kind of bad their first year also. They were in a really wet spot then, so that may have contributed.

This year though they look flawless, I'll try to get pictures of them soon.

Yours looks great May!
 
Steve Thorn
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Michael Helmersson wrote:

Wendy Boardman wrote:Just a quick note everyone. I had found the most amazing 'treasure' a few days ago. My grandsons had just finished eating Pink Lady apples. They brought me the cores. So I cut them open and found this!



Imagine standing under an apple tree that came from a seed in an apple you had eaten, and gave to your grandmother. I can't come up with the words for how profound that would feel.



Yes, that would be really awesome.

My grandmother told me stories of her father, my great grandfather, planting lots of fruit trees and grape vines and how she and her siblings would climb the fruit trees and eat the fruit and grapes that he planted nearby whose vines were climbing up into the fruit trees. It sounded a lot like permaculture actually.

These fruit would be 75 years old or more if they are still alive. I would love to drive by and see if anything was still growing today.
 
Michael Helmersson
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Steve Thorn wrote:

These fruit would be 75 years old or more if they are still alive. I would love to drive by and see if anything was still growing today.



I find it difficult to wrap my head around this. I think it's a result of the disconnection between us and our food. Between us and nature, actually. I'm sure there are cultures where people are routinely reminded of their connection to their ancestors and nature. I think that kind of bond would greatly improve our appreciation of nature and our protection of it.  
 
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