Win a copy of The Edible Ecosystem Solution this week in the Forest Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Greg Martin
  • Leigh Tate

Growing Peaches Naturally

 
pollinator
Posts: 219
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
138
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:

I prefer the shape of your trees over just the whip like growth of some trees. From what I've seen, really healthy peach trees will send out lots of side branches their first year if they've got room.



Glad to hear that. Only concern I have is that the branches are sitting so low I might have to limb up a lot later.

I put a board and a yardstick in the back for better view. This tree is just a bit over 2 month old.

The original soil was pretty poor actually. 3 years ago I grew vegies on the same spot and weeds were taller than my tomato plants. My husband failed to see them and mowed the whole "garden" down. It's amazing permaculture practice can improve the soil in such a short time.
2mpeartree.JPG
2.5m old peach tree grown from seed
2.5m old peach tree grown from seed
topview.JPG
[Thumbnail for topview.JPG]
 
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That peach tree looks amazing May, great pictures!

May Lotito wrote:Only concern I have is that the branches are sitting so low I might have to limb up a lot later.



I wouldn't change a thing.

I'm planning to leave the really low branches on my peach trees and leave the trees unpruned. My 1 year old peach seedling had some branches come out near the bottom, and they seem to grow at about a 45 degree angle and quickly get pretty far off the ground. The tree seems really healthy like this so far.


Hope you get some tasty peaches soon!
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 219
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
138
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I read through the posts on fruit tree pruning and the "never prune" thread as well. Each got it's own reason for doing in a certain way.

I think I am lucky to have a health tree starting from pit and learn about different options from the start. It seems to be a waste of opportunity not to let this tree grow naturally.

If I end up with a 25 ft tree with whirling low branches, I will send my kids climbing up there to get the fruit.

Thanks Steve for all the info. Your tree is one year older than mine, it kind of gives me a heads up what to expect.
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Excited to see how your peach tree turns out May!
 
Posts: 19
Location: East of England
3
forest garden books urban
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I didn't see this mention, but apologies if I missed it. The UK isn't known for growing peaches but we proudly grew 9 peaches on our tree this year! This was the tree's second year in our garden (we didn't grow it from seed), but last year we lost the only tiny fruit we had to leaf curl. This year we removed any sign of leaf curl we saw every day and that did the trick.

Our 'problem', which didn't end up being too much of a problem, was that where the fruit stalk reached the fruit body, cracks were appearing, which were big enough for ants to get into. One fruit had about 10 ants inside when we opened it up, and on another fruit the stone had some mould on it. Because we only had 9 fruits we were picking them all pretty frequently so nothing had a chance to rot, and the ants weren't a problem, but wondered if this is just a peach thing, or if it's an issue that can be dealt with.
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey Al, awesome to hear that you got 9 peaches!

Do you have any photos of the trees?

One thing that I bet would help both of those issues, is to put a mound of soil around the peach tree, to help increase the soil drainage. One of my peach trees was getting leaf curl, and I added a mound around the tree, and combined with not pruning it, I haven't had any more issues with it.

I bet that the excess water is also probably causing the peaches to swell quickly and crack.

These are just guesses based on the above information, but if you've got photos of the trees, that could give a better picture (no pun intended ) of the situation.
 
Al William
Posts: 19
Location: East of England
3
forest garden books urban
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Steve Thorn wrote:Hey Al, awesome to hear that you got 9 peaches!

Do you have any photos of the trees?

...



Thanks Steve, that's helpful. I don't have any pictures to hand but will take some, although we've eaten all the fruit!

Swelling from water makes sense. I'm glad we got any - being in the unpredictable UK climate, where peaches aren't a usual crop, I was really worried when they flowered so early and it was still very cold outside. The flowers were all gone long before it warmed up and I was worried it was too cold/windy for pollinators, but they must have sneaked in at some point!
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The peach seedlings are about 4 months old and already about 3 feet tall.

It's time to transplant them into their final home in the food forest! It's really hot right now and definitely not the ideal time to transplant them, but peaches seem to be pretty tough in the hot weather, so I think they'll do fine.
20200719_155506.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200719_155506.jpg]
20200719_191519.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200719_191519.jpg]
20200719_191507.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200719_191507.jpg]
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It's a great time of year here to plant peach pits!
20200819_154044.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200819_154044.jpg]
 
Steve Thorn
gardener
Posts: 2004
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
763
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These are three of four of my biggest peach trees at the moment. The fourth one was grown from seed and will probably pass these by the end of the year.
20200809_155203.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20200809_155203.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 760
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
311
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A late Merry Christmas and happy newyear to you Steve and others reading. That's some impressive growth your peaches are showing Steve! I thought the 3 foot in a year mine achieved was crazy, yours are double that!
I have replanted the peach trees that i had growing in the oak shaded nursery. About thirty were big enough to be given a new place. Some 5 were still small and i give those another year in that spot to get up to speed. I have lost all my peach fruit to the frost for the second year in a row, so no new pits to plant. My plums had a fantastic year though, so i managed to safe some 200 pits of those, Reine Claude type.
I have planted the peach trees seedlings quite close to each other, one and a half feet apart because i want them to function as a wind break/hedge. Last three summers have been so dry and hot for so long that most trees i tried suffered so bad they died. The peaches seem to be little affected by the drought so i thought to use that to my advantage. I've planted them in a row, using composted cow manure/local soil mix, just dig in a long thin spade deep and try to get the roots in as deep as possible, mix the dug out soil with compost and back in it goes. The row consists of a big tree, then a small tree, then a big one, etc. Maybe the small ones turn out better survivors of the summer drought, who knows! If they all survive, i'll have to prune them accordingly, the small ones must stay bushy and lowish and the tall one get to go up higher. I might end up grafting cherries on them, or replanting if they refuse to do what i want them to do. Maybe they all die, but normally something will happen i have not foreseen.
I've had little luck with the hugelcultures we've put in a couple of years ago, but trees planted at the foot of the hugel systems seem to do fine, so i've planted them there too. They'll shade the hugel keeping it moist for longer.
 
May Lotito
pollinator
Posts: 219
Location: Missouri. USA. Zone 6b
138
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is the update of my first year peach tree: it grew 2m tall with trunk of 1.5 inch/4cm in diameter.

The tree has too many lower branches growing into the center. It was surrounded by tall plants when germinated. When those sunflowers were done, more sunlight from south side triggered lots of new growth near ground level. I tried tying the branches for a period of time but it got super windy so I gave up on that.

I read about pruning trees in summer for shaping so I am going to wait till next summer to see how that goes.

I had great fun reading about all these trees growing from seeds. Merry Christmas and a happy new year to you all!
peach-tree-8-months-old.JPG
[Thumbnail for peach-tree-8-months-old.JPG]
 
straws are for suckers. tiny ads are for attractive people.
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic