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Use cut comfrey as green manure and mulch

 
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After my comfrey plants grow tall, flower and fall over I cut them down and pluck the leaves and lay them all around the garden. I drape the stalks at edges or cut them up and lay them at teh base of trees. If I do not cover comfrey with soil it quickly dries and begins to decompose.
 
Posts: 103
Location: Zone 5, Maine Coast
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I tear leaves from my comfrey on a weekly basis to mulch around fruit trees, but lately my ducks have gotten there first and eaten most of it. I'm sure it will pop back up though when the ducks have forgotten about it, and the ducks do their fair share of fertilizing anyway.
 
Posts: 128
Location: Detroit, Michigan
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I don't have but a tiny comfrey plant so I use burdock leaves from my large burdock "patch".
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Elissa Teal wrote:I don't have but a tiny comfrey plant so I use burdock leaves from my large burdock "patch".


I love burdock for its mass of leaves. One of the neighbors has a good sized patch, which my cats have spread while on rodent patrol amongst other neighbors property. The neighbor directly north had a single burdock which was 7-8 feet tall, and just about as wide. When their landlord brought in the gardeners* to clean up the yard, they carefully cut around the burdock - they probably thought he had planted a tree since their last visit. LOL

* I use the term 'gardener' loosely now. Nowadays, most are actually what I call "Mow-blow-go". That's about all they do.

 
Posts: 1947
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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I do this with comfrey and dock. I let them get nice and big and then chop and drop. I prefer that to mow and blow. Small slow solutions, right quieter and less expensive.
 
Posts: 152
Location: Connecticut
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Does chop and drop have diminishing returns? I planted some comfrey but once it pulls up nutrients from the area around where it is, does it still have value? Or am I thinking of chop and drop incorrectly and that it is more a nutrient recycle system? Where it brings back nutrients that could leach through the soil year after year.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3618
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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It pulls it up from the deep (beyond the reach of some crops), and makes some bio available that your other crops couldn't use before.

There may be a point it is pulling up a surplus and you could move it (by using the leaves as mulch or compost somewhere else), or maybe the nearby plants use it all. IT DEPENDS
 
pollinator
Posts: 335
Location: New Zealand
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Here's how I use comfrey in our young but gradually developing food forest.

http://www.familyorganics.co.nz/sue-s-blog/lookmumnospray
 
Posts: 145
Location: Yakima county, Washington state
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I am having great success with my comfrey here in the desert by growing them in a mulch basing full of carbon rich material such as chopped leaves. from what I have read, comfrey is one of the few plants that can take in a 1/1 ratio of water and human urine.
 
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