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Carnivorous plants native to Boston

 
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I live in an apartment building in the city. And while I've got a few exits from my building, the one most convenient also happens to pass where the neighbor takes out their trash. no big deal, it's one day a week. But there appears to be a perpetual cloud of flies right there (it's actually almost impressive how many just do laps in a 4'x4' area). I don't particularly care for passing through the cloud of flies every day, but I'm loathe to spray insecticides or anything.

There is, however a tiny scrap of soil 3 feet away. It's about 10' by 4', and it's got some shrubbery in it.

Does anyone here think it would be possible/feasible/logical to plant some native pitcher plants in there? Bearing in mind that spider plants are scared of me, I'm kind of hoping to just stick these guys in the dirt and forget about 'em. And see if maybe they can reduce the population of flies.

Opinions?
 
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Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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Carnivorous plants will make very little impact I would think. I'd think about building a simple fly trap - one was posted earlier today!

http://lifehacker.com/5571662/build-the-cadillac-of-fly-traps-for-a-fly+free-summer
 
William Jack
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Hrm. You might be right about the pitcher plants. Pity. Tho' I'm not quite ready to build a dog-dropping bait trap and have to keep emptying it out of corpses.

Looks like time for plan B I guess.

Thank you tho'.
 
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your going to need wet and acidic soil if you want carnivorous plants....those preformed pond liner work great though....add 1 part peat moss and 1 part sand.....put that in the preformed pond and add your plants....then add water until its moist....you can only use rain water though because these plants are very sensitive to mineral nutrients and chemicals. Pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpureaare) is your best option also add some live sphagnum moss if you can find it...might need to order online. Good luck
 
William Jack
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Hrm. So here's the thing. That scrap of dirt is technically my neighbor's. I don't think they'd so much as notice if a few pitcher plants moved in, but I don't think I can bury pond liners.

I suspect the soil already is acidic. Not sure how wet it is tho, in general.
 
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This is a specialty of mine. Try planting s. purpurea in a water garden pot/bucket without holes. Pure peat for soil (I use 1/3 coarse sand, must not be alkaline. Soak soil in soft water, water only with rainwater or very soft water.
Alternative would be byblis, perhaps better at catching garden pests. Or plant s. leucophyllum and shelter, much more vigor and catching ability.
 
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