• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Jay Angler
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Paul Fookes
  • Tina Wolf

Safe to feed cooked potatoes to chickens?

 
pollinator
Posts: 4461
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
1198
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey all,

I'm cleaning out the cold room, schlepping out the the potatoes from last year. Long sprouts but not green or anything. They're still good for mashed potatoes, but we're done with that.

I plan to do a char burn and use the excess heat to boil them whole.

My initial thought was to add them to the composter. I've heard that the cooked starch acts as an accelerator.

But: I have a good neighbour who has laying hens. I send surplus veg their way and get lovely eggs when they have a surplus.

Can the chooks safely eat cooked potatoes, skin and all?
 
pollinator
Posts: 2086
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
1026
forest garden rabbit tiny house books solar woodworking
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feed my hens cooked veggies, including all the cast off potatoes. No problem.
 
master gardener
Posts: 2990
Location: Upstate NY, Zone 5, 43 inch Avg. Rainfall
1115
monies home care dog fungi trees chicken food preservation cooking building composting homestead
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feed cooked potatoes all the time to my chickens without any issues, just no green potatoes.
 
master steward
Posts: 11335
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6291
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've read repeatedly, no raw potato ever, but cooked is fine for chickens. Hopefully, all the places I read it weren't just copying some old reference that had never been tested! Wouldn't want to take the risk!
 
pollinator
Posts: 336
102
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feed raw and cooked potatoes/potato peels to my chickens, never had any issues.

I searched old scientific sources about the topic of solanines with poultry.

One paper says that the chicken(s?) died from potato sprouts.
https://www.cabidigitallibrary.org/doi/full/10.5555/19462201396
I wonder if it is really due to the potato sprouts, I did not access the full paper to check if it was really a controlled experiment.

the other, in the same year, states that 2 oz (that would be over 50 g, right?) green potato sprouts per chicken per day caused no issue.
https://www.cabidigitallibrary.org/doi/full/10.5555/19431402771

The other even fed pure solanine, which caused no ill effects
https://www.cabidigitallibrary.org/doi/full/10.5555/19492203028

As birds are usually quite tolerant of solanine, I will continue feeding my chickens whatever potato leftovers I have.

Edit: although I have to add, my chickens always have full access to alternative feeds, they are never forced to finish potatoes.
 
gardener
Posts: 667
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
474
3
foraging books chicken food preservation fiber arts homestead
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've fed raw and cooked potatoes to my flock. They get all the kitchen scrap and vaguely food-like bits. Green. black, whatever. I figure they have enough options to avoid what they don't want to eat and I'll rake it all up after a day or so for the compost pile.

I've never had a problem. I've seen the advice to avoid giving your chickens the same stuff that chickens have been fed for thousands of years (food scrap and garbage, dairy and spoiled foodstuffs) and I discount it. I've yet to see a chicken have trouble after eating anything. They might not eat it again, but no digestive upsets have been seen.
 
Douglas Alpenstock
pollinator
Posts: 4461
Location: Canadian Prairies - Zone 3b
1198
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am grateful for all of your thoughtful responses.

The thing is, the potatoes I'm tossing out represent a helluva lot of hands-on labour and effort. Especially in last year's drought! We produced too much food! And we just didn't eat fast enough! We gave a lot away, but there is still more.

I guess that on the flip side, it's true that we would never, ever have gone hungry. My parents grew up in the Great Depression, and even though they had dollars in the bank the only true security in their minds was a well-stocked larder, canning room, freezer, and cold room with enough home-grown-and-harvested potatoes to feed an army.

So when I think of think of disposing of the entirely edible excess of the last year, I think about how it could kickstart the good food for the next year. It must not be wasted.

And I like fresh eggs! Good place to start.
 
Kristine Keeney
gardener
Posts: 667
Location: South-southeast Texas, technically the "Golden Crescent", zone 9a
474
3
foraging books chicken food preservation fiber arts homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That attitude is why everything goes to the chickens. I would rather turn old bits of something into eggs than clog the communal trash pile with something that can be otherwise useful.

The chickens can eat it, or it'll compost and feed plants and the cycle will continue.
It's hard when you are looking at days of hard work and time and effort and having to try to figure out how you can best salvage some of that hard work.

It's a great way to rethink things - you've had the use of the potential food and it can go to making more, different, potential food.
 
pollinator
Posts: 437
Location: Finland, Scandinavia
341
trees
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cooked potatoes are greatly loved, raw or peels less so. Green potatoes are a bit poisonpus but no chicken will touch them.Chickens are very good at discerning what is good for them and what is not.
 
Jay Angler
master steward
Posts: 11335
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
6291
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kaarina Kreus wrote: Green potatoes are a bit poisonous but no chicken will touch them.Chickens are very good at discerning what is good for them and what is not.

I bury my green potatoes any place they won't be in the way. I don't care if I don't get a "crop" from them, as if they grow, they will feed the soil. I've had them sprout in unexpected places, including in the compost!
 
It's weird that we cook bacon and bake cookies. Eat this tiny ad:
FREE Perma Veggies Book! - Learn how to grow the most delicious and nutritious food with the least amount of work.
https://permies.com/t/238620/perennial-vegetables/FREE-Perma-Veggies-Book
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic