• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • r ranson
  • Nancy Reading
  • Anne Miller
  • Jay Angler
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Nicole Alderman
master gardeners:
  • Christopher Weeks
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Matt McSpadden
  • Rachel Lindsay
  • Jeremy VanGelder

What's the best Verma compost system?

 
gardener
Posts: 1591
Location: N. California
694
2
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking medical herbs ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know there's as many answers to this question as people doing Verma compost.  
I have been using a two plastic bin system since I started several years ago.  It has worked well for me. This winter my son accidentally broke both the inner and outer bins.
The bin system has worked for me, but since I have to rebuild my system I thought I would look into other options.  I have thought about making a wooden bin. It seems like it would stay cooler in the summer.  I also have an old bathtub, I'm just not sure I want to have that large of a system.
I'm interested in your thoughts and ideas. Thanks
 
gardener
Posts: 970
Location: France, Burgundy, parc naturel Morvan
420
forest garden fish fungi trees food preservation cooking solar wood heat woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The best worm composting is the fastest one. I've got a lazy system with many many worms, because i don't really use the compost that much. It's a big mass. I believe that that is important. In the big mass, worms can migrate. In case of drought and frost they move into the bottom. I've just build some retaining walls out of breeze blocks. And keep adding. I don't do a lot of turning but dig a hole to dump the weekly scraps into. Everything that ever was alive goes in.
I take out a few buckets a year to make aerated compost teas and multiply all the biodiversity the compost offers a thousand times.. But i realise it's a rare luxury. Most people are constantly scraping for every bit of compost available. I got a neighbor who provides cow dung, so i use that if i need a quick fix.
The bigger the mass became, the more worms it contained.
I see people who are very busy with their wormeries, me five minutes a week.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 222
Location: Southwest VT, zone 5a slope ~10°-30°
99
foraging fiber arts ungarbage
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There is a place at the edge of the forest where various weeds, sticks, and other plant matter are regularly deposited. The worms in the forest floor enjoy whatever is thrown there and turn it into dark, rich, well aerated worm castings. No extra effort except for rummaging under the pile now and then for the finished worm earth. I think they may be the notorious jumping worms but am not sure. Woodlice also seem to help in the endeavor.
 
pollinator
Posts: 677
Location: Sierra Nevada Foothills, Zone 7b
151
dog forest garden fish fungi trees hunting books food preservation building wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mine is an old garden trailer. Works great but it is big, like 2 bathtubs. I don't pull stuff out of it but twice a year. Mine is easy enough until harvest day and then it's a lot of work! I have really bad land so I need a lot of junk to mend it.

I think you should just go back to the bins that were working for you. Either by repurchasing or I know people make worm bins with a drill and some plastic totes from Ace Hardware. I kinda think these systems are the best, as far as speed, efficiency, and ease.
 
Beware the other head of science - it bites! Nibble on this message:
Native Bee Guide - now FREE for a while
https://permies.com/wiki/140436/Native-Bee-Guide-FREE
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic