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Going poo-less: No Shampoo/Soap in the Shower

 
Posts: 70
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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Grace Gierucki wrote:I've been no-poo for about 1 1/2 years, I use baking soda and ACV about every 5-6 days and it has been working well for me until now.  I have two questions/problems- 1.  We moved from the city to a house with softened water and my hair has gone totally limp and gets greasy much faster, any ideas what tweaks to make? 2.  Sunscreen, the bane of my existence. I'm very fair and need to use it, I make my own which I am super happy with but it's causing my hair line to be constantly greasy! I'm considering adding a diluted Dr. Bronners step to my routine just along these edges, has anyone tried this?  Thank you



I was the first mate on a boat, where I worked 16hrs a day every day in the sun, all day, and I used coconut oil for sunscreen 100% of the time. I was smart about the sun exposure but it helped enough to keep me from burning 99% of the time, two days that I recall getting pink...and that was really due to me rubbing off the oil.

My tolerance for coconut oil might be a lot higher than some peoples, rather the grease of it than sunscreen. My body chemistry makes coconut oil turn sweet smelling after a few hours, almost over-ripe type sweet.

Dr Bronners may help with the limpness, though it can dry out hair too. Try it!
 
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Location: La Bretagne
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Hello all.
I stopped shampooing my hair fourteen years ago. Before stopping, my hair was oily and I had to wash it daily. I don't remember how long the reduction transition took for me, but I did get to my desired length of time between washings of one week, probably the first year

When I initially stopped using shampoo, I constantly made herbal teas that I would use in place of shampoo. The tea always had honey in it and I placed this honey-sweetened tea on my dry hair, rinsing it out after a minute or so. Through the years, I simplified stopped making tea and just watered down the honey. I still wash my hair like this.

When I used chemical shampoo on my hair, along with being greasy, it was super straight and lifeless. When I stopped shampooing it, that changed. I have body and waves now. I cannot say how long it took to happen though. I intended to document my experience, but never did.

Oh, and I only use soap on my hands. I simply brush the rest of my body with a soft, natural bristle body brush.

I wish everyone courage in this endeavor.

Tiffane
 
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I didn't use any shampoo for about one year now and my hair never looked better. I wash my hair basically whenever I feel like as it doesn't become too oily now for a long time. I use very warm water as a wash, and then rinse with herbal infusion or decoction. Any herbs, whatever I have the most of.  I do use filtered water for both steps as city water irritates my scalp, even without shampoo.
 One thing I noticed is that if my herb mixture includes burdock root, it makes my hair very wavy/curly (I do have naturally on the wavy side hair). So much so as people have asked me, where I had my hair done, LOL.
 
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I don't wash my hair often. Maybe once a week.



Savannah, me, too. Hairdressers always comment how healthy my hair is and I attribute it to not over-washing and seldom blow-drying (except in winter- no wet hair in -40!); I don't use "real" conditioner either- after a wash I slather my face and hands with hand lotion and drag them through my towel-dried hair.

A while back I tried just baking soda and water to wash my hair. Because it doesn't feel noticeable in already wet hair, I was never sure how well I'd worked it through but once it dried, my hair and scalp felt as clean as ever. I would like to do it that way all the time (cheap!) but somehow I acquired a virtual lifetime-worth of shampoos and feel like it would be a waste of money to dump them. On the other hand, though my hair is healthy, my scalp is increasingly sick-scaly and itchy. Maybe the shampoos are to blame?
 
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I read somewhere recently that we have microbes (specifically, beneficial bacteria like lactobacillus or however spelt) all over us just like we have them all thru us. So using soap, like antibiotics, blanket bombs, killing indescriminately, rather than blanket balming, which should rather be the case. It's all part of the permanent culture (read sustainable) that we permies tend to side with. But understandably it's hard to have it pervade all or even many areas of life, or to extrapolate out from permie gardening principles (going organic, polyculture over monoculture) to daily life. I believe soaps in the near future will start to support our natural microbiome just as we make and eat sauerkraut knowing that's best for us. Thanks for starting this thread. OgreNick
 
Tiffaney Dex
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Nick Dimitri wrote:I read somewhere recently that we have microbes (specifically, beneficial bacteria like lactobacillus or however spelt) all over us just like we have them all thru us. So using soap, like antibiotics, blanket bombs, killing indescriminately, rather than blanket balming, which should rather be the case. (snip) . I believe soaps in the near future will  start to support our natural microbiome just as we make and eat sauerkraut knowing that's best for us. Thanks for starting this thread. OgreNick


Yes, we do have flora on our skin, just like in our intestines. And that flora helps keep us healthy.  So, the use of antibacterial soaps is harmful to our natural flora balance, to add to the list of other reasons why it is bad. I do not think that our body will ever be able to adjust to soap,  however. Naturally, we are acidic. That is why people use apple cider vinegar as a rince. It brings our skin back to its natural pH level. Soap is alkaline. It is traditionally made with wood ash lye and animal fats or oil. I believe it is too big of a jump for our flora to go from an acidic environment to an alkaline one. It's like trying to grow oregano  in heather soil. It doesn't work without changing the soil.
 
gardener
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I was inspired to go poo-less by this post, and also by a clip from Victorian Farm with Ruth Goodman.  This BBC documentary on how people in Great Britain lived in different eras:  
   That's not the episode the clip is in, I don't think.  I forgot where it is... so I'll sum it up.

Ruth Goodman explained that in many time periods in England, because bathing was viewed as harmful, people did it rarely.  And that's how they were living on this farm - Ruth, Peter and Alex - to stay true to character.  She gets a lukewarm bath Little-House-on-the-Prairie style, in a metal trough in the house.  Her hair is long like women of that era.  She explains that what women did was comb their hair very thoroughly, every night, top to bottom.  And just not to get rid of knots - the main purpose to spread the natural oils through the hair, which kept it shiny and clean.  That made perfect sense to me since if you look at the hair of native peoples of the Americas, they also often have long hair, don't wash all the time, and it's gorgeous.  Shiny and nice.

I know this sounds silly, but all this time I thought combing was for knot prevention, and a little for lint removal.  So I wouldn't get dreadlocks.  I've had long hair most of my life, as a child and youth it was sit-on-it long.  But I had no understanding that combing was a traditional way of keeping it clean.  So when I went poo-less recently I stuck with the combing procedure.  And lo and behold; it works!  Even for my long, somewhat oily hair.

Throughout history there have been tons of famous hair-combers, who again, I misunderstood the purpose of why they did that so much.  A favored classical painting pose of women is of one with long hair combing it from end to end, and I thought that was sort of a statement on how "proper" women spent their time.  I didn't get that it was actually just the way to care for hair without washing it frequently.  I think it's also oddly relaxing.  A set of male hair combers are the warriors of Sparta, who typically wore their hair long, and famously spent time before battle combing it.  They were mocked for this activity, but it makes sense to me now!

Here is a classic painting, John Williams Waterhouse, "A Mermaid", with the mermaid combing her hair.  He liked to paint women combing their hair; maybe he thought it was hot?  If you look at the picture, I'm pretty sure she's using the technique of spreading the oils to the ends... Now that I'm doing it, I'm realizing that's one of the ways.  She's not bored or vain!  She's doing something necessary!  (Especially for a mermaid, as anyone with long hair knows how tangled it gets swimming.) hah  It is amazing how different things look once I finally understand the purpose.



 
gardener
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I'm on my third week of going without soap or shampoo in the shower. Still take daily hot showers and use a washrag to scrub a bit but no soap. My wife has been the judge on if any problems have come from it and so far no issues. Plus I work 40 hours a week and so far no issues at the office either.

I'm finding that my skin is becoming clearer with less blemishes. Still a few but less than I was having. Though I have also cut back a lot on sugar so that could also play a role.

I'm out in the heat working a lot on my homestead and at times for my job doing restoration work. But not using shampoo or soap in the shower has not been an issue even on days like yesterday when I was outside in 90+ degree weather for the whole day working.

Going to keep doing this as long as no problems show up. Been a good experience so far!
 
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What about the smelly sweat? I know salt somewhat works, but I can't go swimming in the sea when I'm in the city (9 months). Any Ideas?
 
Posts: 44
Location: Western Washington
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I'm 44 years old and stopped using shampoo after reading the labels when I was about 13 years old.

I have very fine hair (it used to be very long) and have always received comments on how nice my hair feels. When asked what kind of shampoo I use most people don't seem to believe me when I say that I don't use any.

I run a lot hotter than most people (I sweat easily and profusely) and have found that the less meat, dairy, and manufactured foods I eat the less I have body odor.

Last year I did a week long water fast (no food, just water) and by the end of it my wife asked what kind of soap I was using as I smelled really good... I just noted that I had been exercising and was a bit sweaty. Perhaps eating real foods and cleansing my system of toxins got rid of the nasty stuff that I had been storing up and it was no longer exuding when I sweat. I cannot say for sure but I used to smell quite bad when sweating heavily and no people don't seem to even notice any smell.

Personally, I suspect that bad body odor is in good part due to stored toxins being exuded when sweating.

As to hair, water has always worked just fine for me. Yes, when I first stopped shampooing my hair it felt weird for a couple of weeks... but then it became soft, easy to comb (it used to be down to my waist), and very soft.
 
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Dave Burton wrote:Snowberries could be used as a shampoo and soap alternative because they have a poorly palatable substance called saponins which give snowberries their rather soapy taste. Some other naturally soapy plants include yucca leaves, grated soaproot used like a bar of soap and rubbed between the hands, mountain lilac berries can be pressed in between the palms of your hands with water to produce a soap, and buffalo gourd leaves work the same way.



This is what I was waiting to see as I belatedly went page by page through this thread. I was hoping to see more extensive lists of plants with natural saponins that can be used this way.

When I was stationed in Hawaii, I found a jungle flower there called "shampoo ginger." Pretty red flower heads, and you could see the soapsud appearance on the surface if they were damp from rain. Now that I have settled in the tropics, I hope I can find the plant available in the DR. But if not, I would like to know about other "natural shampoo" plants.
 
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I have long wavy/curly hair on the top of my head, and keep the sides + back short. Been poo-less for the past six months. My hair looks and feel great, and doesn't smell like anything. No issues with hair knots any more. Took about two months for my hair to normalize after going poo-less. I basically massage my hair and scalp under the hot shower to get sweat, dirt, extra oil, etc, off, and that's it. My hair keeps some of its natural oils afterwards. Showering every 2 days is a good cadence for me, I'm fairly active, and poo-less I spend a lot less time showering. A shower for me takes about 5 minutes, and have no guilt taking a maintenance shower (post-workout, going out, etc).

My spouse had absolutely no idea until I told her about two months ago; she thought the practice was "gross." I occasionally work in a little scented oil for aromatic effect so she thinks I'm back on the 'poo wagon. After much pleading on my spouse's part I did fully shampoo my hair with a natural shampoo last week; my hair was so dry and fragile afterwards, looked terrible, and it kept getting stuck in my hair brush. Took a few days to get back to normal. I have some knots and frayed ends as a result.
 
steward
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Oh, fun thing! Also, I think aloe vera could work as a soap kidn of thing if you need/want it. I prepared some aloe vera to eat this Winter Break when I was back in Houston, and that thing was slippery. So, there's probably a lot of saponins in that, too. As for the eating, it tastes like water and is kind of slimy to eat. I found it rather tasteless, but I did not mind the slimy texture. So I guess I might be fine eating snails and slugs when the occasion arises.

Now, getting back to topic, I have been pooless and soapless for my entire body and hair, except for my face and hands, for I forget how long. I think it's been two or three years, maybe longer??? But anyhow, my skin and hair have been mostly fine. My hair is a little bit oily, and my skin is a tad dry. But these may be more of things with nutrition that I am figuring out. I'm currently finding a balance point, after having been quite extreme about fasting for a few months, I am now eating one meal a day of pretty good food- salad greens, eggs, as best quality saturated fats I can, as best quality meat I can, little bit of fermented foods, and a little bit of fruit (every other day).

As for smell, I have been described by people as "smelling human", and people who have really good noses describe me as "sweet-smelling or fruity smelling". They tell me that I don't smell bad or good, but that I just smell natural. And the people with really good noses, I guess this may be my personal pheromone that I produce.
 
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Since I left my 9-5 in March of last year I've slowly been cutting back on showers. Basically only doing so on "town" days. I've toyed with the idea of no shampoo for years but never could pull the trigger on it. My hair is middle of my back long and very greasy. My Mom brainwashed me lol. I also have psoriasis and would get a itchy, flaky scalp after a couple days. I've not used soap on my body in years due to severe dry skin on my back. That drives Mom mad even now. 😉
So with this being February and I pretty much live in a hoodie and beanie I decided to have a F@#kPoo February (TM) and see how it goes. Last I shampooed my hair was Jan 28. First time I showered the hot water seemed to really work, no greese and a nice shine to my hair. 4 days later and my head was so itchy I was about to cry. The hot water fixed that but my hair was so heavy. Then last Thursday I water washed it again and definitely could feel a difference. This morning it really don't feel greasy like it should after 4 days and very little itch. I'm gonna get a shower after I feed the chickens and I'm really curious to find out how it will feel after that.
Maybe I will tell Mom when I visit for supper tonight lol!
 
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jacque greenleaf wrote:I quit using regular shampoo and conditioner several years ago. I have curly hair, and the silicone in most shampoos/conditioners is not good for curls.

I thoroughly "wash" my hair every two or three days with plain water in the shower. About every week or ten days, when the oil builds up, I use some Dr. Bronner's liquid soap on it. I've never had so many curls with so much body.

I've used Dr. Bronner's for showering for years, I buy it by the gallon and dilute it. And do I ever love not having my shower cluttered up with numerous plastic bottles of various goops.



Been using Dr. Bronner for a few years and coconut oil as a conditioner after I started to start being sensitive to commercial shampoo and body wash. I very happy with it over all, even if I over do the oil somtomes. Takes two years to go threw the coconut oil 22 dollar costco tub and I buy a litre of Dr. Bronners any where from 4 to 6 months depending on how often I wash the dog with it also.
 
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I did this for a time. The baking soda and ACV for my hair. Now I simply wash it less, about every 3 days. I'm a pretty oily person in general so my hair looked wet quick and while I gave it several months it didn't much change.
 
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I tried this when I was younger and had longer hair. I was able to go about 6-8 months just scrubbing really thoroughly in the shower. My angle, however, had been wanting to reduce waste, but I found the additional time needed in the shower to give a thorough enough scrub without shampoo used more water than if I just did a quick wash every day.

A second time I tried, my hair was healthy, but my scalp was absolutely unhealthy - flaky, red, pimples and such. I gave up at that point, and now my scalp is much healthier using shampoo every day. Just goes to show you, different strokes and all that.

Everyone's head will be different, but I imagine if you can make it through an adjustment period (maybe even up to a year) for your oil glands to slow down and your scalp to recover form the initial shock, it's totally doable.
 
pollinator
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We quit shampoos conditioners and body products about 7 years ago after a chance reading of an article/'challenge' on the web. I use diluted solution of bicarb followed by ACV half and half with filtered water. My hair was mid length at the time and it's been shorter and now longer. It is very thick too. My hair is no longer greasy, I no longer suffer from dandruff.  Both of which I spent over the years a lot of money on, trying to find a product that worked.  I have a theory that products marketed for those 'conditions' encourage rather than cure, as lets face it, a business model that cures patients is hardly sustainable! I am so pleased  because not only is my hair in great condition, the bathroom is uncluttered, and I spend less no time shopping for 'beauty' products. Going 'poo-less was the first step in a journey that now sees me questioning everything we bring into the house and has me returning products that basically 'stink' from offgassing of who knows what.

Since getting interested in the PEP Natural Medicine, I've been using an Hibiscus and ACV infusion as a final rinse and I swear it's colouring out my grey hair!

A year ago we fitted a Berkey shower filter - it's so nice to stand under a shower without the pong of chlorine!

I now blend essential oils to formulate my perfumes and husband's after shave.

We've found that a small glass spray bottle of diluted ACV for underarms is very effective.

The equivalent of two cans of shaving gel ago, I asked my husband to trial coconut oil as an alternative and let me know what he thought. That was 'two cans' ago. He rubs a small amount of organic coconut oil over his face, and he uses a small jug of very hot water to clean the razor as he goes. (which he empties onto the garden) Water in the sink loses its heat too quickly, plus, there's a real danger of oil build up in the pipes.

If you're still wavering on the fence about removing what are, lets not kid ourselves here, expensive and toxin-laden products from your life, then take it in easy steps, and you'll eventually get to where you want (need?) to be.

My thought is that ditching shampoo is a great place to start!

Lesley
 
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Been on the no-poo kick for about 8 years now. I rinse with hot water in the shower 2-3 times per week. Every 6 months or so, I’ll use a bit of shampoo to see what I’m missing; and am always disappointed with the results! My hair ends up frizzy and poofy, and my scalp dry. Maybe i’m using the “wrong” shampoo, but no-poo works well for me.

I can speak to the “transition period” being a thing, it took me more than a month of greasy hair to adjust and regulate.

It works well for my hair/skin type, but not so much for my partner, who has very fine hair. She tried the dry shampoo thing for a while, but this also wasn’t ideal.

Obviously this is a personal choice, but I don’t think it will be as effective for everyone!

 
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I tried using no shampoo last summer but I felt that it only works for me as long as I wash daily and so I stopped at around fall again. Guess I will try again this summer with some tips from here.
 
pollinator
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I started the no poo/soap thing about 10 days ago, about the time I found the Kickstarter for Buildng a Better World, and haven't told my wife yet... she hasn't mentioned anything either, so I'm experimenting! LOL

Anyways, growing up as a city boy, I DO like my hot showers most days, even if they are shorter than they once were. I don't use anything but hot water and my hands to scrub, although I am still using commercial toothpaste... I want to experiment with baking soda soon. My teeth have felt much cleaner since I switched to a zero carb/carnivore diet. I wasn't such a good brusher when younger, so don't have pretty teeth, but a major difference in the texture on the surface, how smooth they are now, never bleed anymore when brushing, and I never smell my breath anymore (like I could when eating a lot of junk food and bread, etc.)

So, 2019 has been a great year for changes so far... CV way of eating for 3 months and down 18 pounds (maybe 30-40 more to go to get back to what I consider ideal, around 170-180 at 5'9" and 50 years old in another 6 weeks or so), sleeping better, more energy, food bill overall is down, complexion is better, cracked elbows, knees and feet are mostly gone, Then, I found Paul's book Kickstarter, and went poo-less and am investigating more positive changes to make. Maybe a bit off topic, but... <shrugs>
 
pollinator
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I thought folks here might want to see this video that is spreading misconceptions about going without showering.

 
Leif Ing
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LOL, that was an amusing video to be sure. I'm not sure how long it's been now... maybe 6 weeks since I quit using shampoo, and mainly only use soap on my hands after using the bathroom. I feel great and haven't noticed any of the side effects he was talking about. Not a single person has said I smelled ripe, and I have some in my life who wouldn't hesitate if that was what they thought!

The main difference is that I DO shower, pretty much every day... no baby wipe showers for me. Just hot water usually, oh, and if I am shaving, some lotion for my face to lubricate the razor. My showers are shorter now, but I DO love my hot showers... will take them cold if needed though, or it's really hot out! So, that video is about a totally different experience... I don't think I'd like just not showering at all!

Poo-less for the win! My kids now say I smell like nothing, which is a win in my mind, because before I always smelled "good", ie. like the aroma of the shampoo... now, I smell fine but with almost no smell at all they think... and the wife seems totally happy with it too.
 
Devin Lavign
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I think a big part of the issue the guy in the video had was using the baby wipes. He got his rashes where he used them, likely due to the use of them.

And yes, still bathing with water but without all the products that remove all your body's natural stuff to keep your skin and hair healthy is the way to go.
 
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I grew up in Jamaica and remember my nanny using what she called tuna to wash my hair. I just did a DuckDuckGo search and found it's just regular prickly pear (which I happen to have in my yard).
https://www.medicinalherbs-4u.com/tuna-plant.html

I wash my dry hair less than once a week, and use organic shampoo & conditioner, but have noticed my hair's more fly-away than usual. I think I'll try the tuna for fun.
Thanks for this thread!
 
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Has anyone heard of New Wash from Hairstory? I tried going poo-less while RVing full time for a year and it just didn’t work. The baking soda and ACV bit is intriguing and sounds effective enough to try some day... but before I’d heard of that, my hairstylist recommended a new product called New Wash. My husband and I use both wash our hair once every two weeks or so and use their balm and dry shampoo powder in between. It’s expensive I think (I think I spend about $300 on hair products per year - all through hairstory), but it’s hands down the safest, salon-quality wash that I have ever experienced.

Now, my husband and I will eventually shower And drain into in a grey water catchment system AND while we are actively working on building passive income now, we know that we will very soon move from the city and into rural life and our income will likely change considerably. So, this begs the question: is New Wash safe for grey water irrigation (ingredients list attached)? And/Or can we save money and still have great hair by transitioning away from New Wash? Would love your thoughts, interweb!
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I tried the pooless thing for several weeks but found my scalp was getting too greasy/itchy and things weren't improving so I went back to my normal use of Grandpa's pine tar soap. I might try cutting back to just washing my hair with the soap once a week and using water in between, as some others in this thread have mentioned.
 
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I’ve tried it for at least a year, and the oil never calmed down. Made my own shampoo bars, that gave me build up on my hair.  I would have to use baking soda to get the oil out every week or so, and then it would be really dry & brittle for a couple days. I tried using vinegar to smooth it back out, but that didn’t help much. Then I put some conditioner on it to combat the dryness from the baking soda, but that didn’t help much either. The texture was like straw. So I finally gave up and now I use Attitude products - at least they don’t have all of the toxins that are in the regular products.
 
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I tried for about 6 weeks a few years ago and my hair stank like it was rotting.  I couldn't even stand the smell of myself.  I tried all kinds of stuff to get it clean, hoping the stink would go away--baking soda, ACV, coconut oil...  It was just terrible, so I gave up.  The static was insane, too, and I don't ever have static.

I decided to try it again in early April and it's not nearly as bad this time.  It still smells a little like greasy hair when it's wet, but it's not the kind of thing that would gag anyone that had to ride in a car with me (at least, I don't think it's that bad).  One thing--it gets really waxy.  Not oily like I was used to when I'd a go a week between washings, but more like a dog's hair.  And if I finger-comb it enough, my hand gets covered in that white residue like one gets after petting dogs.  I did use lather from french milled soap (South of France brand, I think) once about two weeks ago, and it really took that waxiness away.

About a week ago I finally got a boar bristle brush (Goody brand, bought online from a dry goods store in Lancaster County PA) and it's about as useful as teats on a bull.  Doesn't penetrate the hair except right near my hairline, where the hair is finest (the hair on the top of my head is finer and lighter than from my ears down to my neck and when I was a kid it was blonde on top and red on the bottom and people thought I had a bad dye job).  Makes my hair super staticky, too.  I prefer my regular old plastic brush, which just glides right through.  I have buttcrack-length hair, and the tangles used to be so much worse.

I usually have my hair in a bun 24-7, but lately I've been trying to keep it down in a braid more; I think that helps my scalp air out a bit and the hair gets to move, so it probably helps distribute the oils.  The scalp under the spot where my bun sits really hurt/ felt irritated for like two days and leaving it down took that right away.

I'll be honest: I have to go to the dentist soon for a long-overdue root canal (thanks, covid-19) and I'm kind of afraid that she's going to smell my hair and think I'm dirty or that the stink will give her a headache.  Maybe I'll just wear a scarf and explain why.  I don't want to wash my hair with shampoo and reset the clock.
 
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Jordan, are you talking nettle tea (infusion)
 
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Sarah Greenlee wrote
question: is New Wash safe for grey water irrigation (ingredients list attached)?  



What are you irrigating? Greywater used to irrigate trees is pretty safe even with the usual suspects of household cleaners (no extreme toxins). Purely organic greywater should be fine for all but root crops, especially if it’s run through a sand bed filtration first. A lot depends on your system.
 
Julie Reed
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Kevin Carson wrote: I tried the pooless thing for several weeks but found my scalp was getting too greasy/itchy and things weren't improving



I have thick long hair, and agree that it leads to greasy feeling hair, even after a month of ‘transition’. I understand the desire to avoid chemicals, but I’m really baffled by this obsession of going ‘pooless’. I’m quite happy with natural, chemical free shampoos, which are non-toxic and could be safely eaten. Ditto for soap. I don’t like fragrances, aside from essential oils, but I also don’t like to feel grungy or smell bad.
 
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Julie Reed wrote:

I understand the desire to avoid chemicals, but I’m really baffled by this obsession of going ‘pooless’. I’m quite happy with natural, chemical free shampoos, which are non-toxic and could be safely eaten. Ditto for soap. I don’t like fragrances, aside from essential oils, but I also don’t like to feel grungy or smell bad.



I’m not sure which ones of those “natural shampoos” could actually be safely eaten, or how “non-toxic” they really are.  For that matter, I wouldn’t eat soap either.  But if I use something on my head that can be absorbed through the skin, I want to know exactly what’s in it and how it was made, and I don’t trust the manufacturer to disclose all the relevant information.  

I use diluted Dr Bronner’s soap to wash my hair, followed by diluted apple cider vinegar, which gets me perfectly clean and smelling good.  There never was a transition period either.  Sometimes I use diluted baking soda instead of Dr Bronner’s, which works just as well.

 
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I’m SO glad this discussion came up💕 I’ve been telling my Husband I’ve wanted to go more natural with all my products. We are def greenies with all of this as we are city dwellers soon to become mountain earth dwellers. Every part of my being is screaming natural. From detoxing my body via gut and down to a cellular level to my environment. I have Usnea growing on our mountain acreage and I desire to be just as pure as the air quality where we will build our circular  earthen home. Right now as city dwellers we have treated water.... once we get to the homestead we will collect rainwater and get from the waterfall stream (no icky foam..... happy dance as up in My area even the cleanest rivers and streams are polluted) we will only filter for drinking.... so going no poo....... could I start now, with the treated water we have, or wait till we get to our mountain land..... what type of results have you all had with different water types??
 
Julie Reed
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Lara Mig wrote:I’m not sure which ones of those “natural shampoos” could actually be safely eaten, or how “non-toxic” they really are.  For that matter, I wouldn’t eat soap either.  But if I use something on my head that can be absorbed through the skin, I want to know exactly what’s in it and how it was made, and I don’t trust the manufacturer to disclose all the relevant information.  

I use diluted Dr Bronner’s soap to wash my hair, followed by diluted apple cider vinegar, which gets me perfectly clean and smelling good.  There never was a transition period either.  Sometimes I use diluted baking soda instead of Dr Bronner’s, which works just as well.



My point was not that one should be eating soap, merely that the ingredients are safe enough that you could consume them. Everything in the Dr Bronners bar soap I buy is ‘edible’. Maybe you did not have a transition period because you did not go pooless- ie- only water? You say you don’t trust the manufacturers yet it seems you trust Dr Bronner? Isn’t that a manufacturer?
They are not cheap, but there are several high quality non-toxic natural shampoos similar to Bronners, and yes, I trust those companies to disclose all the ingredients. Why wouldn’t they? It’s to their advantage to market honestly, because anyone paying $20+ for a bottle of shampoo is going to be someone who knows what they want it to do, and what ingredients are acceptable or not. And of course by law they have to (ironically, laws for labeling cosmetics, including shampoo, are stricter than for processed food). I realize not everyone can afford expensive non-toxic shampoo, and baking soda and ACV are probably good alternatives, just as ‘water only’ may be perfectly fine for some folks. But my comment was addressing the idea that there is no harm to your body or the environment when a soap/shampoo has simple, natural ingredients that one could even ingest without harm. So you don’t need to feel guilty. Or greasy or icky either!
 
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Julie Reed wrote:

Lara Mig wrote:I’m not sure which ones of those “natural shampoos” could actually be safely eaten, or how “non-toxic” they really are.  For that matter, I wouldn’t eat soap either.  But if I use something on my head that can be absorbed through the skin, I want to know exactly what’s in it and how it was made, and I don’t trust the manufacturer to disclose all the relevant information.  

I use diluted Dr Bronner’s soap to wash my hair, followed by diluted apple cider vinegar, which gets me perfectly clean and smelling good.  There never was a transition period either.  Sometimes I use diluted baking soda instead of Dr Bronner’s, which works just as well.



My point was not that one should be eating soap, merely that the ingredients are safe enough that you could consume them. Everything in the Dr Bronners bar soap I buy is ‘edible’. Maybe you did not have a transition period because you did not go pooless- ie- only water? You say you don’t trust the manufacturers yet it seems you trust Dr Bronner? Isn’t that a manufacturer?
They are not cheap, but there are several high quality non-toxic natural shampoos similar to Bronners, and yes, I trust those companies to disclose all the ingredients. Why wouldn’t they? It’s to their advantage to market honestly, because anyone paying $20+ for a bottle of shampoo is going to be someone who knows what they want it to do, and what ingredients are acceptable or not. And of course by law they have to (ironically, laws for labeling cosmetics, including shampoo, are stricter than for processed food). I realize not everyone can afford expensive non-toxic shampoo, and baking soda and ACV are probably good alternatives, just as ‘water only’ may be perfectly fine for some folks. But my comment was addressing the idea that there is no harm to your body or the environment when a soap/shampoo has simple, natural ingredients that one could even ingest without harm. So you don’t need to feel guilty. Or greasy or icky either!



I’m just not sure why I need to bother.  I know that plain Castile soap, which is what Dr Bronner’s is, is safe.  I know that apple cider vinegar is safe.  I know that baking soda is safe.  Ditto for lemons.  All of these things keep me clean and unsmelly and keep my hair looking good.

I guess I could do a whole lot of research on the various chemicals used in all those all-natural shampoos, find a whole lot of articles about all the fragrance ingredients and detergents and preservatives, read up on each ingredient and learn about what it does to my body, learn about their interactions, find out what the long term effects are, and keep track of any changes in their formulations, but it kinda sounds like a full time job and I already have one.  Maybe I’ll find a wonderful shampoo that doesn’t do anything bad to me, but the minuscule improvement in my looks really doesn’t seem worth all that research.  
 
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Been using J.R. Liggett's shampoo bars for a few years now. Only 3 ingredients.
 
Let me tell you a story about a man named Jed. He made this tiny ad:
how do we get more backing of the brk?
https://permies.com/t/145583/backing-brk
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