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How late can I harvest sweet potatoes?

 
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Due to excess life chaos, we are dipping below freezing at night now. Warms up in the day, but about 3-4 hours a night are below 32, last night went down to 25.
How much of that can sweet potatoes take? The vines are long dead, we did quick freezes early, it's only the roots I care about.
Any advice?
I am really not sure I'm making it out there for several more days.
 
pollinator
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I think anything below 50 degrees can degrade the flavor and storage life, but as long as they haven't actually frozen, they may still be ok. Just get them in as soon as you can and keep a close eye on them in storage. Or may just go ahead and eat them up, they may not be as sweet as otherwise could be, but probably still good.

If you depend on them to start slips next year and if you see them getting a soft spot, withering or turning rubbery you might be able to go ahead and start your slips, and pot them up for house plants until spring.
 
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I tend to agree with Mark.  As long as they (or parts of them) haven’t frozen, you should be OK.
 
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Sweet potatoes are sensitive to frost and should be harvested before the first frost occurs. If the vines are already dead, you can still harvest the roots, but they may not be as sweet and flavorful as if they had been harvested earlier in the season. The roots can tolerate a few light frosts, but a hard frost will damage them. If you are unable to harvest the sweet potatoes for several more days, it is best to cover them with a layer of mulch or straw to protect them from the frost.
 
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The hardest part about harvesting sweet potatoes late in the season is providing them with the week or two of 80 to 90 degrees F temperatures that they need to cure before putting them into storage.  The curing process allows them to convert their milky sap into sugar to raise their sugar content and also to heal any damage incurred during harvest.  The most convenient locations to get these higher temperatures late in the year is either in a greenhouse, a cloche, a car parked in the sun or in an attic space that heats up during the day.
 
Pearl Sutton
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I got about 3/4 of them out today, have a tolerable day tomorrow to get the rest out and amend the beds.
I'll see how many I can get to dry on the kitchen floor, no better place.    Some are looking pretty rough, any that don't dry out well will be canner fodder.

So they are basically still tolerable, even having gone through several light freezes, not all perfect and looking classy, but still edible.
 
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