• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Liv Smith
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • Jay Angler
  • Timothy Norton
gardeners:
  • Jordan Holland
  • Jeremy VanGelder
  • Andrés Bernal

Plant ID please (possibly/probably a tomatillo!)

 
Posts: 8437
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial, clay/loam with few rocks 50" yearly rain
2121
4
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nightshade family...maybe a ground cherry of some sort?
20230917_162408-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20230917_162408-2.jpg]
20230917_165606_Burst05-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20230917_165606_Burst05-2.jpg]
 
gardener
Posts: 1466
Location: the mountains of western nc
410
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation wood heat
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
sure looks like a Physalis! not a species i’m familiar with, though.
 
author & steward
Posts: 6688
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2984
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Pending production of fruit, I'd call it tomatillo.
 
pollinator
Posts: 445
228
hugelkultur forest garden food preservation medical herbs wood heat
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks just like my tomatillos but you should know fairly soon when fruit starts setting. Nice healthy plant though.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 8437
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial, clay/loam with few rocks 50" yearly rain
2121
4
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks everyone!

It would be wonderful if it's a tomatillo

At first though I was perplexed how one could show up there as we have not grown them for years and never at this place?

This is how it might have happened....
Our son gave us some beautiful tomatillas over the summer...my husband made salsa verde.
All of our non soapy water at the kitchen sink is saved and poured out the window into a tub and from there I bucket out to water plants in that location...We think there must have been fresh seeds in the water when I poured the last of the tub on the edge of that bed

Fingers crossed and all for fruit before we get a frost!
 
gardener
Posts: 3368
Location: South of Capricorn
1705
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i have had similar things happen with tomatillos-- i grow them every 5 years or so, since nobody eats them but me and i end up with gluts of tomatillos. during the intervening years (all of them) there are still tomatillos that come up. they seem to be really tenacious about coming back!
fingers crossed, hope it works!
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 8437
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial, clay/loam with few rocks 50" yearly rain
2121
4
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Tereza!

I try to watch for volunteers and find them as exciting as anything I've planted....it's good to know tomatillos are that prolific.

I've added a picture of the area...am still surprised I didn't notice it until very recently but then I've been distracted by my pet spider that is right there within a foot of the nightshade.

The hose from the faucet goes to our washing mch on the back porch (which is strung with clothesline) and the black tub is where the kitchen water goes (photo from open window)...sometimes filling twice a day.

I've called it my shade garden because it's somewhat protected from afternoon heat but really it still gets a lot of sun.
To the right are tubs of moringa and dahlias and thyme and on the left with the nightshade on the edge are hazelnuts, elderflowers, coralbells, a hosta, feverfew, orris root iris, daylilies and other iris, blue salvia, bugle weed and some rose cuttings...a blueberry...and a lemon balm...getting crowded.

I tried to circle the tomatillo and the spider egg case but couldn't get it too work.  Got it!
Tomatillo circled on the right, spider egg case on the left.
20230918_092633-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20230918_092633-2.jpg]
20230918_101826.gif
[Thumbnail for 20230918_101826.gif]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 8437
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial, clay/loam with few rocks 50" yearly rain
2121
4
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not so sure it's a tomatilla anymore?
Sprawling and blooming but lanterns are still smalll and no fruit inside?
It's from the bottom of the photo to the top...not bushy at all.
I like it with my blue salvia though
20231017_145948-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20231017_145948-2.jpg]
20231017_145923-2.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20231017_145923-2.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 120
Location: MD, USA. zone 7
43
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tomatillos require cross pollination, at least two separate plants. One without outside pollen does that, it makes the little lanterns, but there's no fruit inside.
 
Posts: 8
2
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, I also suspect it to be a tomatillo. While it may have come from your water, it may have also been planted by birds. They’re very effective tomatillo planters.

Your volunteer likely just needs a friend to grow fruit. And no worries about gender mismatch, since tomatillos are hermaphrodite. If you can find it a buddy, you’ll get fruit on both!
 
master gardener
Posts: 10126
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
5352
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do you still have many pollinators around? You might try sacrificing 1 flower to push against several other blooms and see if that helps?

That said, I have found tomatillos to have a mind of their own and tend *not* to make fruit until you think it's too cold for them to bother trying. Then all of a sudden, I have a bunch. However, was it the temperature, or was it that the right pollinator just happened to come by one day... Sometimes, I never know, I just observe and make educated or uneducated guesses!
gift
 
10 Podcast Review of the book Just Enough by Azby Brown
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic