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Which Shrubs, Oaks, Pines, other Trees would you buy from these options?

 
Posts: 56
Location: North-facing Hillside in Missouri Ozarks, 6b, 45" avg. precip.
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Hi all,

I am trying to decide what to buy from what's still available from the Missouri Department of Conservation Tree Seedling sale.

My 40 acres are currently forested, but not very densely so. Lots of white oak, hickories, some red oak, and other species here and there. Most of the marketable timber was harvested by a company just before i bought the land. Across the whole site there are 2 or 3 large continuous openings in the canopy - 1/2 acre each say. This is all located on a north-facing hillside, up to the flat ridgetop.

My goals as far as forest management go are to increase diversity, host and feed more wildlife, and of course to have some good stuff for myself to eat and look at. Given that, i've already decided i'll be getting the Eastern Wahoo, Deciduous Holly, Persimmon, and Wild Plum.

I'm aiming for a nice round number of 10 different species. Planning on getting 10 seedlings of each (minimum amount). So which other 6 species should i pick?

I'm so new to this world. I apologize for not even knowing what other information i could share to guide this decision-making. I welcome even replies that are just pointing me in the right direction of questions to ask that will help me to decide for myself.

The plants i'm deciding between, ordered by how likely i currently think i am to buy (most likely first) plus a few notes:

Persimmon - clear winner for the Ozarks from what i've seen here
Wild Plum - may be trickier but still worth a try
Deciduous Holly - pretty, bird food
Eastern Wahoo - wild turkey food
Shortleaf Pine - native to MO, almost no evergreens on my land
Smooth Sumac - for transition zone from trees into clearing where my cabin is
False Indigo - could be good ground cover down at the low point of the property, road level
Bald Cypress - fast-growing
Shumard Oak - grows in association w red and white oaks i have
Eastern Red Cedar - would love to have cedar wood... in 30 years?
Aromatic Sumac
Ohio Buckeye
Northern Red Oak
Black Oak
Bur Oak
Pin Oak
Loblolly Pine - fast-growing
Pitch Loblolly Pine - hardier hybrid


Extended info, in case someone wants to peruse it:

Shrubs
Aromatic Sumac Rhus aromatica

Description
A shrub found over much of the state, usually in thickets. Fruit ripens in late spring or early summer and is eaten by many species of birds. Fruit is bright red to orange when mature. Also called fragrant sumac. Height at maturity is 8 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks and erosion control. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


Smooth Sumac Rhus glabra

Description
Thicket-forming shrub or small tree is found statewide in old fields, prairies, woods borders and road right-of-ways. Was widely used by Native Americans and early settlers for various medicinal uses. Provides excellent food and cover for wildlife. The dark green summer foliage, followed by scarlet fall color and bright red berries, making sumac an attractive plant. Height at maturity is 20 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for wildlife food and cover.


√ Eastern Wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus

Description
Usually grows as a shrub, but sometimes a small tree. This plant has spreading branches with an irregular crown. Flowers Late April - June. Produces fruit September - October. Occurs on wooded slopes, bluffs and open woods. Found throughout Missouri. Fruit is eaten by a number of species of birds including wild turkey.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for wildlife food and cover.


False Indigo Amorpha fruticosa

Description
Found statewide in moist ground along streams, rocky banks and low wet woods. The flowers are 2 to 6 inches long with dense clusters of purple tube-shaped flowers. This shrub is in the legume family and the seeds are eaten by quail and other wildlife. Bees and butterflies are attracted to the flowers. Height at maturity is 12 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for erosion control and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.



Oaks
Black Oak Quercus velutina

Description
Found statewide, but most common in the Ozarks. Will grow on dry, poor upland sites, but grows best in well-drained soils. Good acorn producer. Height at maturity is 85 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for reforestation. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


Bur Oak Quercus macrocarpa

Description
Large acorns with fringed caps are characteristic of this oak. Grows statewide on a variety of sites including dry uplands and moist lowlands. Reaches 3 - 4 feet in diameter. Height at maturity is 80 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for erosion control, reforestation and wetland restoration. Wildlife benefit is food.


Northern Red Oak Quercus rubra

Description
One of the most widespread and commercially important of the oaks. Found on a wide variety of sites statewide. Grows best in fertile, sandy loam soils. Height at maturity is 90 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks, erosion control, and reforestation. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


Shumard Oak Quercus shumardii

Description
A large, commercially valuable red oak found naturally in all but the northern third of Missouri. Frequently grows in association with northern red oak and white oak. Can be planted on a wide variety of sites. Height at maturity is 80-100 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks, erosion control, reforestation and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


Pin Oak Quercus palustris

Description
This fast-growing oak grows naturally on poorly drained, heavy bottomland sites statewide. It is often used for landscaping as it will grow well on a wide variety of sites, from wet to dry. The small acorns are eaten by many mammals and birds. They are an important winter food for migration waterfowl. Height at maturity is 70-80 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks, erosion control, reforestation and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.



Pines
Shortleaf Pine Pinus echinata

Description
Only pine native to Missouri. Grows 2 - 3 feet in diameter. Does very well on dry, upland sites in the Ozarks. Probably should not be planted north of the Missouri River. Height at maturity is 80-100 ft.

Uses
This species can be used for windbreak and reforestation. Wildlife benefit is cover.


Loblolly Pine Pinus taeda

Description
Native throughout the southern United States. Introduced and grows well in southern Missouri. This is a fast-growing pine that is an important timber tree for the production of lumber and pulp. Similar in appearance to shortleaf pine, but has longer needles and a larger cone. Grows on a wide variety of sites from poor, dry upland to rich bottomland soils. Height at maturity is 90 ft.

Uses
The species can be used for windbreak, reforestation, and cover. Wildlife benefit is cover.


Pitch Loblolly Pine Pinus rigida x Pinus taeda

Description
This hybrid pine combines the cold hardiness and drought tolerance of pitch pine with the larger mature size, moist soil tolerance and fast growth of loblolly pine. Develops a dense, extensive root system that helps this tree adapt to extreme soil conditions. The long, naturally shed needles are used to make pine straw mulch for the landscape industry. Does best in full sun to partial shade. Height at maturity is 60 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for wind breaks, erosion control and reforestation. Wildlife benefit is cover.



Fruit/Nut/Other
Bald Cypress Taxodium distichum

Description
Very large trees that may live for more than 1,000 years. Commonly associated with southeastern swamps, but adapts easily to a wide range of sites. Young trees grow rapidly on good sites and may reach 30 feet in height in 10 years. Extremely durable wood.

Uses
This species is commonly used for wind breaks, erosion control, reforestation and wetland restoration.


Ohio Buckeye Aesculus glabra

Description
Found statewide, this is a slow-growing small tree to 30 feet tall. It is one of the first trees to leaf out and flower in the spring and the first to lose its leaves in the fall. Large greenish-yellow flowers are attractive to hummingbirds. The seeds are large, shiny and dark brown. They are sometimes carried in the pocket for good luck and supposedly to prevent rheumatism. Will tolerate lots of shade. Height at maturity is 50 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefit is food.


√ Deciduous Holly Ilex decidua

Description
Also called possumhaw this small to medium sized tree produces regular crops of brilliant red fruit on the female plant. The male and female flowers are borne on separate plants so several trees should be planted near each other. After the leaves fall the fruit is visible for long distances which helps feed birds in late winter and early spring when other food sources are depleted. Height at maturity is 20ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


Eastern Red Cedar Juniperus virginiana

Description
The common juniper is found statewide on a wide variety of soils. Aromatic wood is valuable for closet lining and novelties. Excellent for wildlife and windbreak planting. Red cedar may become an invasive problem in your pastures and idle fields. It spreads easily. Height at maturity is 60 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for wind breaks and wetland restoration. Wildlife benefits are also food and cover.


√ Persimmon Diospyros virginiana

Description
A small to medium tree whose fruit is valuable to people and wildlife. Among the hardest of North American woods. The male and female flowers are borne on separate plants so several trees should be planted near each other. Height at maturity is 60-70 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks, erosion control, reforestation and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.


√ Wild Plum Prunus spp.

Description
This is a mixture of native Missouri plums, which could include - American plum, American wild plum, sandhill plum, Osage plum, river plum, sand cherry, thorn plum, wild yellow plum, red plum, August plum, goose plum, hog plum, and sloe. Plums are thicket forming trees found statewide. One of the first trees to bloom in the spring. Produces a bright red or yellow edible fruit. Provides excellent food and cover for wildlife. Height at maturity is 25 ft.

Uses
This species can be commonly used for windbreaks, erosion control and wetlands restoration. Wildlife benefits are food and cover.
 
pioneer
Posts: 206
Location: Herding farming god of travel and fast horses.Holy fool.
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Some cool tree's on your list.Any permies in your area that have been successful in cultivating some of those trees? Maybe be a Rebel Farmer like Sepp Holzer and experiment with some.If you can create the right micro-climate you can do some wild things.Your in missouri so you have quiet a bit of water compared to Southwest.Find out if they our full sun or understory plants.May need more shade or partial shade,may need full sun.Some our going to die either way but the hardier plants our going to survive anyway.If they our listed from the Missouri Department of Conservation people must have had some luck growing them.The money spent on plants is better then Mcdonalds.Anyway just some two-cents hope this helps you out.Happy Growings.
 
Liam Hession
Posts: 56
Location: North-facing Hillside in Missouri Ozarks, 6b, 45" avg. precip.
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I went ahead with 10 each of these, including Redbud which i didn't originally notice on the list of available species:

1 Wild Plum
2 Eastern Wahoo
3 Deciduous Holly
4 Persimmon
5 Redbud
6 Shortleaf Pine
7 Smooth Sumac
8 Bald Cypress
9 Shumard Oak
10 False Indigo
 
Posts: 523
Location: SW PA USA zone 6a altitude 1188ft Grafter, veggie gardener
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I would've got 10 or more of both Red Oak and the Pin Oak. They are both good suppliers of acorns for wildlife and I love Red Oak for firewood at some time in the future. I would have maybe planted 1 or 2 Buckeye trees but then I noticed the minimum of 10 requirement.

Were I in your place I would put in a lot of Sugar Maples. I know they do good here but not sure in your state. I'd suggest you look at Musser Forests for tree and bush seedlings. Something I've noticed with them is that it may be cheaper to get a larger quantity. I'm not saying cheaper per tree; but the charge is lower for more trees.

And then I'd go with a lot of nut and fruit trees. You can supply a lot of food for both yourself and the wildlife. Keep the brush down around them and keep them trimmed ..... somewhat.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3624
Location: 4b
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Nothing to add with regards to the type of trees, but I ordered from Missouri Dept of Conservation a couple years ago.  They shipped to Wisconsin and I was very happy with the trees.  They were healthy, strong, and had great root systems.  I recommend them highly, even if you are out of state.  Very good prices even with shipping.
 
Ben Skiba
pioneer
Posts: 206
Location: Herding farming god of travel and fast horses.Holy fool.
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Some good people to research if you haven't already our Ben Law The woodland way and Sepp Holzer. Ben law does alot of coppicing and restoration also natural building if you haven't heard of him.He's from the Uk but definately applies for the states.
 
Posts: 152
Location: Southern Colorado, 6300', zone 6a, 16" precipitation
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I vote for bur oak. It has the acorns with the least tanins and is most palatable to humans. Why not try pawpaw trees?

I can vouch that false indigo is a tough survivor in arid conditions, but you don't need to worry about that. However, it is the only nitrogen fixer on your list, so I would spam those trees where ever there is bare ground and nothing else grows. However, they are shade intolerant so you can't use them very well as a ground cover or understory.
 
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