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Homeless Camping Best Repair Practices

 
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Here in the PNW we have a lot of houseless folk. Iā€™m not going to grandstand about what a plight, but it is. One thing I have noticed is a lot of erosion around camping sites after die-off from regular trampling. Does anyone know of a way to prevent this, specific to our region as the high precipitation makes this a constant concern? Thanks so much!
 
pollinator
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spread a layer of gravel on the paths.
Have you heard of the "Dignity Village" in the area?
https://dignityvillage.org/
 
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My suggestion would be to do some guerilla gardening using some grass seed.

Google says:

The most resilient types of grass are Kentucky blue grass, perennial rye, Bermuda grass, tall fescue and Zoysia

 
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Maybe there's a way to hook up the residents with a truckload of wood chips to spread around. That would solve the immediate problem of trampling and mud, and decrease the erosion after the fact.
 
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Just to clarify ā€“ is the erosion due to wear and tear from feet, or subsequent erosion by water following vegetation destruction by feet/drought conditions?
I think the two problems might be best tackled in different ways. The former by improving the surface ā€“ replacing soft vegetation by tougher plants, paved areas etc. the latter by drainage improvements or different vegetation selections.
 
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Phil Stevens wrote:Maybe there's a way to hook up the residents with a truckload of wood chips to spread around. That would solve the immediate problem of trampling and mud, and decrease the erosion after the fact.


Yup, woodchips would be my first aid solution also.
 
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